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Ice Cream without the screaming
August 19, 2014 3:03 PM   Subscribe


 
Isn't this basically just frozen whipped cream? Is that really the same as ice cream?
posted by smackfu at 3:09 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


totally gonna do this. totally gonna try and not immediately drop in a cup of coffee.
posted by nadawi at 3:17 PM on August 19


Well, according to the FDA, in the US, ice cream is a frozen food made from a mixture of dairy products, containing at least 10% milkfat, so I guess this counts.

I'd give this a try, yup.
posted by rtha at 3:18 PM on August 19 [3 favorites]


Is that really the same as ice cream?

Minus the eggs, yes. Ice cream is basically ingredients + air.
posted by Mr. Six at 3:18 PM on August 19 [3 favorites]


Theoretically you could just make whipped cream as usual and put in any flavor you want?
posted by bleep at 3:19 PM on August 19


Fill two 500-mililiter or one 1-pint airtight container

Which is it? Do I need to buy twice as many ingredients if I need to feed the in-laws in imperial?
posted by biffa at 3:22 PM on August 19 [5 favorites]


this wouldn't taste anything like whipped cream
posted by Sebmojo at 3:24 PM on August 19


Thanks for posting this a half hour before I head out to do some grocery shopping.
posted by Pudhoho at 3:24 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


I tried to make ice cream with just heavy cream back in my ill-advised Atkins days. The sweetened condensed milk is going to hopefully give it much more smoothness as opposed to just having lumps of butterfat and ice crystals. Wish I had some of these ingredients lying around to try it tonight!
posted by Madamina at 3:25 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


Which is it?

A litre of water's a pint and three quarters is an easy way to remember that particular measurement.

This seems to be the same recipe on nigella.com. It calls for 2x pint or 2x half litre containers.
posted by Solomon at 3:27 PM on August 19 [2 favorites]


Alcohol prevents the ice crystals from forming. I like a splash of rum, but vanilla extract works too.
posted by snickerdoodle at 3:28 PM on August 19 [3 favorites]


SIX HOURS! No way. I demand immediate gratification.
posted by Keith Talent at 3:36 PM on August 19 [2 favorites]


Of the "Genius Recipes," I can vouch for Gabrielle Hamilton's grilled cheese sandwich, which subs in mayonnaise for butter as a cooking medium. Sounds crazy and heretical, but works brilliantly, just as she says.
posted by neroli at 3:37 PM on August 19 [6 favorites]


But is it good?
posted by mazola at 3:38 PM on August 19


Yes!
posted by neroli at 3:40 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


I can confirm this is very, very good. I have a 1kg yogurt tub full of it in the deep freezer right now.
posted by skybluepink at 3:40 PM on August 19 [3 favorites]


Isn't this basically just frozen whipped cream? Is that really the same as ice cream?

It's a semifreddo, i.e. frozen mousse. Make it and your guests will weep. Serve with donuts, etc.
posted by polymodus at 3:45 PM on August 19 [8 favorites]


Frozen whipped cream tastes remarkably ice cream-like.
posted by any portmanteau in a storm at 3:53 PM on August 19


But is it good?

It really is, and I get a little squeamish around mayonnaise. It doesn't sound so weird when you think of it as mostly oil.
posted by Room 641-A at 3:53 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


Yep, I usually use mayo too. I started using it when I read somewhere that short order cooks do it all the time.
posted by odin53 at 3:56 PM on August 19


I really just want barely sweetened creme fraiche or smetana ice cream. Why doesn't that exist right now in my freezer, who is responsible for this terrible crime against humanity.
posted by elizardbits at 4:00 PM on August 19 [2 favorites]


Good gravy, here are two dead easy recipes:

1) pureed banana and Bailey's Irish Cream mixed and poured into a container for freezing or you could churn it for a more whipped texture;

2) very ripe fruit, juice of one lemon, cup of sugar, cup of heavy cream, mix and churn

I speak as a person who just acquired a Lello Musso 4080 and presently hiding it from my husband.
posted by jadepearl at 4:05 PM on August 19 [2 favorites]


Serve with donuts, etc.

No, yuck. Instead, hit 'em with the Cape Codder sundae - something impossible to find outside of little mom'n pop ice-cream stands on the South Coast of Massachusetts or in RI. Serve up a scoop of coffee ice-cream with a scoop of orange sherbet and pineapple sauce. (Some places will have it as its own flavor with the orange and coffee already swirled together.)
posted by Slap*Happy at 4:11 PM on August 19 [9 favorites]


The very concept of FRAUDULENT ICE CREAM MADE FROM FUCKING BANANAS used to enrage me beyond imagining, but then I tried some from a place in Union Square and it was infuriatingly delicious. I'm still mad about it but in a hypocritical way as i hungrily devour it.
posted by elizardbits at 4:12 PM on August 19 [25 favorites]


A litre of water's a pint and three quarters is an easy way to remember that particular measurement.

That works for imperial pints but not US pints. Separated by a common measurement...
posted by Dip Flash at 4:12 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


i retain the right to be mad about mug cakes forever tho
posted by elizardbits at 4:12 PM on August 19 [6 favorites]


I just made this, this week. It's not ice cream (according to the FDA), but it sure tastes and feels like it...and it's so easy.
posted by MtDewd at 4:17 PM on August 19 [4 favorites]


I'm totally going to try making this. It's getting hot out this week, and I need something to keep the focus on while I'm working inside.

Single-ingredient banana 'ice cream' isn't quite like actual ice cream, but I could see it being exactly what you should feed a child who wants ice cream. Also, I've found it ... I dunno, it gets stale after a while, maybe? Given a couple months in the fridge, it's just not quite as magically delicious. Best eaten more or less right away.

Slap*Happy: Any notion of what this "Cape Codder" sundae is? This appears to be beyond Google's powers.
posted by wormwood23 at 4:47 PM on August 19


Wormwood, Slap*Happy literally explained it immediately after mentioning it
posted by DoctorFedora at 4:51 PM on August 19 [3 favorites]


I retract my previous statement.
posted by wormwood23 at 4:56 PM on August 19


Slap*Happy: Any notion of what this "Cape Codder" sundae is? This appears to be beyond Google's powers.

Kinda breaking my google, too - Used to be a lot more prevalent when I was a kid, and even had its own Hood (Brighams, maybe?) flavor, with coffee, vanilla and orange sherbet stripes, like Neapolitan. It's sometimes still available as a Sundae, the key components being coffee ice cream and orange sherbet, usually with pineapple sauce (pineapple stewed into a chunky syrup), maybe some hot fudge.
posted by Slap*Happy at 4:57 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


Used to be a lot more prevalent when I was a kid

Perhaps this confection, like so many things, cannot exist even notionally, outside of Rhode Island.
posted by GenjiandProust at 5:06 PM on August 19 [9 favorites]


Theoretically you could just make whipped cream as usual and put in any flavor you want?

Wait. You want to make... non-coffee-flavored... ice cream?
posted by GenjiandProust at 5:08 PM on August 19 [8 favorites]


Mint! With chocolate chips! Oh you could use peppermint schnapps in it, couldn't you. Hmm.
posted by rtha at 5:12 PM on August 19 [2 favorites]


Wait. You want to make... non-coffee-flavored... ice cream?

GenjiandProust, you are my favorite one of all.
posted by Room 641-A at 5:29 PM on August 19 [4 favorites]


If you do the frozen banana -> icecream trick, try adding a bit of peanut butter, and ground cardamom and ginger to taste, then sprinkle with crushed almonds or really nuts of any type. Delicious!
posted by Jon Mitchell at 5:31 PM on August 19 [5 favorites]


I'mnot a big fan of coffee ice cream, but I think I can make this work wthout upsettig the chemical balance (emulsifier+antifreeze) by swapping out the espresso powder with cocoa and the espresso liqueur with chocolate liqueur (or mint liqueur, or vanilla extract or rum).

Perhaps a variant where I reduce the sugar and replace the espresso with Tang and the liqueur with orange liqueur?

Actually, now that I think about it, cocoa and orange liqueur would be the bomb....
posted by sourwookie at 5:37 PM on August 19


I stopped eating coffee ice cream when I realized it kept me up with the same effectiveness as regular coffee.
posted by bleep at 5:46 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


I'mnot a big fan of coffee ice cream, but I think I can make this work wthout upsettig the chemical balance (emulsifier+antifreeze) by swapping out ...

If you swap out the coffee stuff and instead use the zest and juice of one lemon and one lime, it's also very good.

(I've not made it in a while, but it used to be one of my go-to summer dessert recipes. I probably just used a can of sweetened condensed milk and about 3/4 pint whipping cream; it's been a while and I'm not sure how much cream. )
posted by leahwrenn at 6:05 PM on August 19


Serve with donuts, etc.

No, yuck.


It's a French Laundry combo. That happens to respect the history of Italian semifreddo, which was often served with freshly made brioche. So, totally the opposite of yuck.
posted by polymodus at 6:11 PM on August 19 [5 favorites]


Serious question: what is 'instant espresso powder'? Is that just instant (granulated) coffee?
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 6:37 PM on August 19


OK, answering my own question. Espresso powder. Substitutes.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 6:39 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


Instant espresso is a staple in my pantry, but I don't recommend ever trying to make espresso with it. Not unless you want to experience the crusty rancid coffee smell of the ancient drip coffee pot at your workplace reimagined as a hot beverage.
posted by oneirodynia at 6:58 PM on August 19 [10 favorites]


Kinda breaking my google, too

Try searching for "Cape Coddah".
posted by asterix at 7:44 PM on August 19 [2 favorites]


Ice cream is basically ingredients + air.

Commercial ice cream is ingredients and air. Real ice cream has virtually no air.

(And again I have to plug the virtues of LNO ice cream because it is the best. It is the best thing.)
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 7:53 PM on August 19


Sorry Mr. Six, but if the recipe contains eggs, that's frozen custard, not ice cream.
posted by EinAtlanta at 8:18 PM on August 19


Sorry, EinAtlanta, the classic ice cream recipe begins with an anglaise; egg yolks tempered with cream.
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 8:24 PM on August 19


Commercial ice cream is ingredients and air. Real ice cream has virtually no air.

I guess compared to some modern frozen dessert fluff, but not really... Feel free to not churn your ice cream and see how much your friends acknowledge it as "ice cream".
posted by a box and a stick and a string and a bear at 9:45 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


Well, seeing as I've probably made more ice cream in a week than you've made in your life, sure.

Churning introduces very little air. Consider the density of home- or restaurant-made ice cream with commercial products.

Hell, even consider the density between Haagen-Dasz and other brands.
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 9:50 PM on August 19


fffm, I've worked food R&D most of the last decade, including a decent amount of time with frozen dessert. You're going to find very few ice creams (including ultra premiums like Jeni's) that are going to have less than 20% overrun. That's not exactly "virtually no air".
posted by a box and a stick and a string and a bear at 10:09 PM on August 19


You'll notice I made a distinction between commercial and home/restaurant made.

Details, meh.
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 10:13 PM on August 19


Ah, no true ice cream. Cool, got it.
posted by a box and a stick and a string and a bear at 10:19 PM on August 19 [2 favorites]


Oh come off it. Commercial churning processes are designed to incorporate more air, which you know.

Home- and restaurant-level churning doesn't.
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 10:37 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


Sorry Mr. Six, but if the recipe contains eggs, that's frozen custard, not ice cream.

Ben & Jerry's recipes disagree with you entirely, but if I remember correctly, I think that's because there is no cooking of the eggs in their homemade ice creams — and so no custard.

In addition to Ben & Jerry's egg-cellent bases, I recommend this recipe to make mint, basil and other infused custards, which involve gently heating the egg yolks with the cream and herb base — heating is what makes a custard a custard.

Custard-based ice creams are generally thicker and richer. Heating the base reduces it, before any churning. If you reduce (very gently) for about 30-40 minutes, a recipe that makes a quart of ice cream will instead make a very thick (and luscious) pint.
posted by Mr. Six at 11:08 PM on August 19 [1 favorite]


They changed the recipe on the nigella site? Well that's fantastically cool - it means Nigella ( or whoever does her twitter feed ) was true to their word when I pointed out the metric / imperial issues 2 weeks ago. :-)

That recipe makes stupidly soft and light ice cream - MUCH softer than B&J or HD. I abused a Heston Blumenthal recipe and made it with 3tbsp of Horlicks, 6tbps Cointreau, and some very dark bitter marmalade. Fantastic desert.
posted by sodium lights the horizon at 11:31 PM on August 19 [5 favorites]


This is a variation on a recipe in Rose Elliot's New Complete Vegetarian - she just gives the basic vanilla recipe. I've made that recipe, and it works brilliantly. You can put all kinds of stuff in it. I did it with mascarpone once. Rose Elliot is a fantastic cookery writer, and I recommend her book to everyone, veg or not - for years it's been a present I give to people setting up house, because it has so many recipes for standard things like bread, apple pie, quiche etc that are simple and just work. I like Nigella, too.
posted by Acheman at 12:30 AM on August 20 [1 favorite]


Cook's Country had a version also. I can attest the recipe works and makes fantastic ice cream (and not a sweet as I feared - but pretty rich all the same).
posted by helmutdog at 12:56 AM on August 20 [1 favorite]


Of the "Genius Recipes," I can vouch for Gabrielle Hamilton's grilled cheese sandwich, which subs in mayonnaise for butter as a cooking medium.

Tck. I thought everybody knew that; that's how my late wife made her grilled cheese sandwiches, often adding a bit of raw onion to it as well for added spice.

Annoyingly unprecise that recipe though. A cup of mayonaisse? How much is that?
posted by MartinWisse at 4:26 AM on August 20


I'm trying the grilled cheese recipe now. Update in 15 minutes. Because I'm really hungry.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 5:00 AM on August 20


Yeah, OK. That was pretty great.
posted by His thoughts were red thoughts at 5:32 AM on August 20 [5 favorites]


A cup of mayonaisse? How much is that?

It's a weird recipe because how many times in your life do you want a recipe for ten grilled cheese sandwiches? But a cup of mayo is just that, enough mayo to fill a one-cup volume (about 236 ml for the metrically inclined) -- almost all cooking measurements in the US are volume-based, not weight/mass, and kitchen scales are not common. (And as came up with the ice-cream recipe in this FPP, you have to keep an eye on the difference between imperial and US volume measurements because they have the same names but are not the same volumes.)

I first encountered mayonnaise used for grilling sandwiches in Mexico, and have used it on and off for that ever since. It works well and has a less overwhelmingly greasy taste than using plain butter.
posted by Dip Flash at 5:49 AM on August 20


The very concept of FRAUDULENT ICE CREAM MADE FROM FUCKING BANANAS used to enrage me beyond imagining, but then I tried some from a place in Union Square and it was infuriatingly delicious. I'm still mad about it but in a hypocritical way as i hungrily devour it.

They even sell a gadget for this: Yonanas

It works well, although it is certainly one of those things you buy and then resent it taking up space for the 360 days a year you don't use it.
posted by smackfu at 6:33 AM on August 20


It's a weird recipe because how many times in your life do you want a recipe for ten grilled cheese sandwiches?

Also weird since you wouldn't normally measure things you spread on bread. You just use enough to cover the bread.
posted by smackfu at 6:35 AM on August 20 [1 favorite]


I first encountered mayonnaise used for grilling sandwiches in Mexico

Ooh, another great idea from Mexico: grilled corn on the cob, spread with mayo instead of butter, and then covered in crumbled cotija cheese and whatever else like cilantro, cayenne, lime, etc.
posted by Room 641-A at 7:26 AM on August 20 [1 favorite]


Holy shit are you my co-worker Room 641-A? Because I first heard about this from my co-worker yesterday. Weird.

Anyway. I do not like mayo but the cojita/cayenne/lime combo on grilled corn sounds amazing and I can't wait to try it next week at camping.
posted by Tevin at 7:50 AM on August 20


Me and my lactose intolerant tummy are gonna ignore all this ice cream talk, but I'm favoriting the post for that Genius Recipes link cuz I see lots of good stuff there!
posted by dnash at 9:15 AM on August 20


In a moment of hunger-inspired weakness I bought a double pack of roasted garlic chili aioli from Costco. It's delicious, but wow, there's a lot of it. I wonder what would happen if I used that instead of mayo on the outside of a grilled cheese sandwich.
posted by KathrynT at 9:32 AM on August 20 [2 favorites]


Remove the peel from a banana. Wrap the banana in plastic wrap and place it in the freezer. When it is frozen, unwrap and eat. Best banana "ice cream" you will ever eat.
posted by Dolley at 10:10 AM on August 20 [1 favorite]


I wonder what would happen if I used that instead of mayo on the outside of a grilled cheese sandwich.

Delicious, wonderful things. GO FORTH AND EXPERIMENT.

For bonus points add thinly sliced apple or pear inside the sandwich before grilling.
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 10:52 AM on August 20 [2 favorites]


Delicious, wonderful things. GO FORTH AND EXPERIMENT.

HOLY SHIT YOU ARE NOT KIDDING

that was the best grilled cheese sandwich I've had in ages.

sadly we don't have apples or pears around because of my kid's weird digestive disorder but everyone else should totally do that too
posted by KathrynT at 10:57 AM on August 20 [1 favorite]


Other amazing grilled cheese additions:

- watercress + pear or apple
- pulled pork
- bacon
- caramelized onions, leeks, shallots, and/or fennel
- shredded smoked chicken
- pesto
- jicama
- more cheese
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering at 11:21 AM on August 20 [1 favorite]


Annoyingly unprecise that recipe though. A cup of mayonaisse? How much is that?

240ml in the uk, possibly slightly less in the states I think?

Edit: dip flash pipped me to this, I see.
posted by ominous_paws at 11:22 AM on August 20


pureed banana and Bailey's Irish Cream mixed and poured into a container for freezing or you could churn it for a more whipped texture

jadepearl, ever eaten whipped banana ice cream out of a shoe?
posted by a halcyon day at 11:28 AM on August 20


I've made tons of these Genius Recipes. Not all of them are fantastic but most are pretty darn good. Oddly it's been the desserts that have been not so great. Last winter I thought I might work my way through all of them but several dessert flops got me off track. But the Jamie Oliver roasted lamb shoulder and accompaniments? Holy shit. (I think I remember correctly that that's one of the genius ones. For sure it's on the Food52 site though.)
posted by HotToddy at 7:47 PM on August 20


Perhaps this confection, like so many things, cannot exist even notionally, outside of Rhode Island.

I have been Reliably Informed that the Hood flavor was "Country Club" and a "Country Club Sundae" is still available in the rolling hill-country surrounding Lowell and Lawrence in MA where it's bordering New Hampshire - coffee, vanilla and orange sherbet with jimmies and hot fudge only, as "pineapple topping is gross." Also, Ben and Jerry had a "Capecodder" flavor which was coffee and orange swirl, and was one of their worst selling flavors ever, as people are dumb and don't know what they're missing.
posted by Slap*Happy at 8:01 PM on August 20 [1 favorite]


Halcyon, I have eaten many things, so many things... but really banana gets you the creamy texture and the Bailey's brings the cream and chocolate component. Of course, I type this while walking on my office treadmill.
posted by jadepearl at 8:58 AM on August 22 [1 favorite]


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