You had to have seen this coming, right?
August 20, 2014 9:21 AM   Subscribe


 
A friend's daughter ripped her top off exactly the way the first girl did. Her reflexes were just as quick.
posted by Curious Artificer at 9:25 AM on August 20, 2014


The best part is that all these people decided to post these videos after they turned out this way.
posted by alms at 9:27 AM on August 20, 2014 [8 favorites]


alms: "The best part is that all these people decided to post these videos after they turned out this way."

When life gives you lemons, make ice cold lemonade?
posted by pwnguin at 9:28 AM on August 20, 2014


I stopped the video after it turned into just a succession of 5-year-olds getting concussions.
posted by shakespeherian at 9:33 AM on August 20, 2014 [18 favorites]


Ow. Some of those are funny, but some of them would be seriously painful. Having a big container full of water dropped on your head could cause a serious injury.
posted by yoink at 9:34 AM on August 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


My uncle actually tapped me for this challenge. I spent a good hour fretting about what I was going to do, because I don't have a reliable video recorder and I don't have all taht much to donate, and I was seriously agonizing over what I was going to do.

Then I asked myself "why am I getting all worked up over something that's a fucking Facebook meme," wrote my uncle and said "i'm broke and don't have a camera, pick someone else" and he said sorry and picked my brother instead. (Sorry, bud.)
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 9:35 AM on August 20, 2014 [27 favorites]


Mostly a compilation of people severely underestimating the density of water—and their own strength.
posted by jedicus at 9:35 AM on August 20, 2014 [6 favorites]


I am pretty sure nobody died.
posted by empath at 9:35 AM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


The one where the guy's dog freaks out, runs offscreen towing a sawhorse, and does something is incredible
posted by Riptor at 9:35 AM on August 20, 2014 [30 favorites]


Having a big container wheelie bin full of water dropped on your head could cause a serious injury.
posted by alms at 9:35 AM on August 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


I don't normally like "Fail" video compilations, but the entire "ice bucket challenge" fad is so strange. It's amazing how it has spread so fast.

The thing is, if you do succeed (against all odds, it would seem, based on this video), does that mean you do NOT have to donate to an ALS charity? I get the sense that many people have no idea what ALS is.

I suppose the benefit here is that ALS is getting some more exposure, and apparently donations to ALS charities have spiked, so...
posted by Nevin at 9:35 AM on August 20, 2014 [5 favorites]


My conclusion to that comment was missing. My point was:

The ice bucket challenge thing is stupid and I'm glad the mockery is finally showing up.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 9:36 AM on August 20, 2014 [9 favorites]


Best comment from the original source: "What do we pour on people for concussion awareness?"
posted by TheWhiteSkull at 9:37 AM on August 20, 2014 [54 favorites]


There is beginning to be pushback on the whole "let's dump a bunch of water on the ground!" here in California due to the crazy drought conditions.

Speaking of which, a relevant XKCD.
posted by Celsius1414 at 9:37 AM on August 20, 2014 [6 favorites]


Having a wheelie bin full of water dropped on your head could cause a serious injury.

I'm also impressed with the apparent affluence (swimming pools etc) of some of the people despite what seems to be limited cognitive abilities.
posted by Nevin at 9:37 AM on August 20, 2014 [3 favorites]


I'm also impressed with the apparent affluence (swimming pools etc) of some of the people despite what seems to be limited cognitive abilities.

For example.
posted by Faint of Butt at 9:41 AM on August 20, 2014 [7 favorites]


My uncle actually tapped me for this challenge. I spent a good hour fretting about what I was going to do, because I don't have a reliable video recorder and I don't have all taht much to donate, and I was seriously agonizing over what I was going to do.

this is the crux of my whole discomfort with this issue. I don't think people should guilt others into donating to any cause
posted by Riptor at 9:43 AM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


People surprised to learn: water is heavy.
posted by 2bucksplus at 9:45 AM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


I'm shocked by the number of people who don't realize how heavy and unstable a large container of water is.
posted by futureisunwritten at 9:47 AM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


I grew up doing something similar. It's a Finnish tradition, you cut a hole in the ice of a nearby lake or pond, have a nice sauna, and then jump in. Grab a beer, and repeat.

My favorite part is the sensation of not being able to breathe. It takes a second to get muscles to work right. Exhilarating.

My wife thinks its weird.
posted by Pogo_Fuzzybutt at 9:48 AM on August 20, 2014 [8 favorites]


The Polar Ice Plunge makes more sense to me. Instead of dropping ice cold water on the person, you drop the person in ice cold water.

Isn't that the way Houdini became interested in the occult? Because he was drowning and heard his dead mother calling him? I guess it mostly raises awareness of ghosts.
posted by maxsparber at 9:49 AM on August 20, 2014 [8 favorites]


Am I the only one who has noticed the distinct lack of ice in many of these ice bucket challenge videos? It's great that this effort has resulted in vastly increased donations to ALS charities, but what is so impressive about dumping a bucket of mildly cool water on oneself in the middle of August's crippling heat? For many of these, might as well just show a video of yourself getting under the shower head.
posted by The Gooch at 9:51 AM on August 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


The thing is, if you do succeed (against all odds, it would seem, based on this video), does that mean you do NOT have to donate to an ALS charity?

My understanding is that the original challenge was to donate $10 AND do the ice bucket thing, or skip the ice bucket and donate $100. (I assume there was always some flexibility/donate what you can leeway for the amounts.)

The message, it seems, has gotten watered down.
posted by juliplease at 9:54 AM on August 20, 2014 [15 favorites]


Notice that helmet guy just slumps against the wall afterward.

A trashcan full of water weighs 8 lbs/gal * 50 gal/trashcan = 400lbs. Let's say the trashcan is just a quarter full. That's 100lbs of water that fell at least 6 feet before it hit helmet guy. It would be extremely surprising if helmet guy is okay after this.

This snopes page doesn't take this idea seriously, because "Close examination reveals that the Twitter handle of the parody account is not spelled correctly". The next time I have 100lbs dropped on my head I'll be sure to protect myself by posting about it from a misspelled parody Twitter account.
posted by Jpfed at 9:54 AM on August 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


PSA: a gallon of water weighs 8.5lbs. A five gallon bucket of water weighs over 40. A 13 gallon kitchen trash can weighs over 100.

Fuckers are all gonna brain damage themselves. Good lord.
posted by phunniemee at 9:54 AM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


What would Lou Gehrig do?
posted by nutate at 9:54 AM on August 20, 2014 [8 favorites]


I thought Lena Dunham's was pretty weak - she ducked forward so the water only went over part of her head and she avoided full drenching.
posted by Flashman at 9:55 AM on August 20, 2014




I'm also impressed with the apparent affluence (swimming pools etc) of some of the people despite what seems to be limited cognitive abilities.

I've never been surprised by these two things coinciding.

Been made more cynical, yes.

Impressed, no.
posted by RolandOfEld at 9:57 AM on August 20, 2014 [10 favorites]


'm also impressed with the apparent affluence (swimming pools etc)

If you live in the right part of the country, a house with a swimming pool is fairly common.
posted by empath at 9:58 AM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


Am I the only one who has noticed the distinct lack of ice in many of these ice bucket challenge videos?

I've also noticed a lack of buckets. People use any container, no matter how small. One friend used a glass of water. No ice.

I assume you've all seen Dave Grohl's take on this.
posted by bondcliff at 10:01 AM on August 20, 2014 [9 favorites]


The one where the guy's dog freaks out, runs offscreen towing a sawhorse, and does something is incredible

For all the folks who don't know how heavy water is, that guy fucking killed it. I would have been less smooth than that dumping a trash can full of air on my head.
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 10:04 AM on August 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


My favorite comment on Reddit so far:

Oh my god guys ALS is a terrible thing. I can't believe we've been raising money for it!
posted by wellvis at 10:05 AM on August 20, 2014 [28 favorites]


Pool != affluence

An old stained pool with patches and duct tape is still swimmable for years.
posted by rahnefan at 10:06 AM on August 20, 2014


Why does the dude who drops a block of ice on his head have a fishing pole in his bathtub?
posted by Bulgaroktonos at 10:06 AM on August 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


These kinds of videos are just gross I find, sorry.
posted by Meatafoecure at 10:07 AM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


Why does the dude who drops a block of ice on his head have a fishing pole in his bathtub?

For fishing. Duh.
posted by bondcliff at 10:07 AM on August 20, 2014 [15 favorites]


The Polar Ice Plunge makes more sense to me. Instead of dropping ice cold water on the person, you drop the person in ice cold water.


This is what Dave Bautista did, without a single flinch or complaint. Aside from that my favourite was Vin Diesel who challenged Putin to do it.
posted by elizardbits at 10:08 AM on August 20, 2014 [5 favorites]


Wow, Dave Grohl's looks exactly like every Foo Fighters video.
posted by bleep at 10:12 AM on August 20, 2014


This is what footage I imagine IDEO or OXO uses to design ice bucket challenge ice buckets.
posted by oceanjesse at 10:12 AM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


The Polar Ice Plunge makes more sense to me. Instead of dropping ice cold water on the person, you drop the person in ice cold water.

On New Year's Day in Milwaukee, it's traditional to run into Lake Michigan. I did this once when I was 17. Never. Again. It took me the entire rest of the day - wrapped in a blanket, in front of a fireplace, sipping hot cocoa - to get warm again.
posted by desjardins at 10:14 AM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


There is beginning to be pushback on the whole "let's dump a bunch of water on the ground!" here in California due to the crazy drought conditions.

I've been hearing this from a lot of people, and I get that it looks bad but I think the actual impact is low.

An average bucket is, what, five gallons? A very large bucket might be ten or fifteen.

The ALS association notes nearly 185,000 new donors since the start of the challenge, but donors and participants don't exist in a 1:1 ratio. Youtube has ~600,000 returns for "ice bucket challenge," but a lot of those are compilations or reposts/remixes of othe people's attempts.

If we're generous and call it 400,000 participants at ten gallons a participant (realizing that those numbers are invented), that's four million gallons of water.

According to the Sierra Club, an average California household uses between 80K and 160K gallons of water a year (while also noting a huge variability between regions and households).

Taking those numbers as given (while noting they almost certainly aren't accurate) the amount of water consumed in the challenge so far is about fifty households worth -- even if that's off by an order of magnitude, we're not talking about a proportionally large amount of water, even if it's a lot of water, especially considering that not all the challenges are taking place in California.

By contrast, leakage for old pipes has been estimated to cost the Bay Area alone billions of gallons of water a year. Billions.

The pushback only makes sense in terms of the perception of use than actual impact on the drought. Its biggest impact is in raising money and guilt-tripping people.
posted by cjelli at 10:14 AM on August 20, 2014 [20 favorites]


These kinds of videos are just gross I find, sorry.

Harsh is Yoda yes.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 10:21 AM on August 20, 2014 [7 favorites]


A friend of mine posted herself doing this on Facebook. I was really confused, though, because she only spoke in sign language (ASL) while doing the challenge to raise money for ALS.

Also, I don't understand drunk budget Mario.
posted by Night_owl at 10:22 AM on August 20, 2014 [6 favorites]


I'm glad people are donating.

This is what Dave Bautista did, without a single flinch or complaint.

Guy really needs a bigger tub, though.
posted by zarq at 10:23 AM on August 20, 2014


If the entire population of California were to perform the challenge on the same day, water usage would increase 1.5% which is within normal variation. Like a lot of environmental concerns, feeling superior trumps the reality of the action.
posted by gngstrMNKY at 10:24 AM on August 20, 2014 [18 favorites]


They only way this is relevant to the drought is in making people aware of just how much water they use: You could do the ALS challenge every single day with a 5 gallon bucket, and still end up saving water if you took showers that were just 1 minute shorter! Installing a single low-flow toilet in a household of 4 more than makes up for 5000 people doing the ALS challenge over the course of 1 year.
posted by Nothing at 10:27 AM on August 20, 2014 [11 favorites]


might as well just show a video of yourself getting under the shower head.

I bet there's a video of people screwing that up, too.

Humans, you know...
posted by Kirth Gerson at 10:29 AM on August 20, 2014


My uncle actually tapped me for this challenge. I spent a good hour fretting about what I was going to do, because I don't have a reliable video recorder and I don't have all taht much to donate, and I was seriously agonizing over what I was going to do.

I have decided that the politest response is stony silence, during which I pretend that my dear friends and family have not just 1) publicly dictated not only the recipient, but the amount, of my own personal charitable giving, and 2) told me that if I don't accede to #1, I am supposed to punish myself, tape it, and put it on the internet. My goodness, even if your heart is in the right place, that would be breathtakingly rude, so I'm sure I have misunderstood what they were getting at. If whatever it is they are actually trying to communicate to me is important, I'm sure they will follow up with me to clarify.

But I'm huffy like that.
posted by BrashTech at 10:32 AM on August 20, 2014 [26 favorites]


Do it right or fuck off. Seriously folks...
posted by Pudhoho at 10:33 AM on August 20, 2014


ALS has been getting desperate for attention since Lou Gehrig's endorsement deal expired.
posted by dr_dank at 10:33 AM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


$31.5 million in donations so far.

Good for them. They've almost matched the NIH's annual funding levels for ALS research.

Grumble, grumble, charity is the wrong way to fund medical research, grumble.....
posted by schmod at 10:36 AM on August 20, 2014 [25 favorites]


I guess we can add peer pressure/coercion to the list of emotionally manipulative tools some nonprofits use to raise money. I'm sure that ALS is a perfectly sound charity, but it's frustrating me that a meme is now an effective marketing technique.
posted by snickerdoodle at 10:36 AM on August 20, 2014


Half of these comments read as parody.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 10:39 AM on August 20, 2014 [3 favorites]


Good for them. They've almost matched the NIH's annual funding levels for ALS research.

Not really, they only spend 27% of their budget on research. The largest expenditure is 'public education' (marketing).
posted by empath at 10:43 AM on August 20, 2014 [13 favorites]


I found myself getting cranky about this whole ice bucket thing the other day, until a friend of mine shared her friend's video and it has pretty dramatically altered my attitude. I try to donate every year in honor of a friend's father, but I kicked in a little more.

(You may get something in your eye. Video also features strong language and a young man in a sort of bikini posing provocatively, if that's a problem for your workplace.)
posted by Lyn Never at 10:55 AM on August 20, 2014 [8 favorites]


I just can't wait to see Angelina Jolie and Anna Wintour get doused.

And the hell that Vin Diesel and Giselle will catch for having nominated them.
posted by St. Peepsburg at 10:56 AM on August 20, 2014


Oh, Lyn Never, that is a really, really tough watch.
posted by yoink at 10:59 AM on August 20, 2014


I thought I had ALS a couple of years ago (severe numbness and loss of mobility of one hand, noticeable muscle wasting from shoulder to hand). So I learned a lot about this disease. It turned out that I had severe carpal tunnel syndrome. So I am happy this disease is getting more recognition. It's such an unusual viral phenomenon, though...
posted by Nevin at 11:02 AM on August 20, 2014


I love the one with the guy and his dog, and the dog is right up next to him, all 'OK I'm totally up for this' but then bolts out of the frame almost before the first ice cube hits the ground. He's lucky the dog wasn't attached to the house or he might have lost half the siding on that wall.

But my favorite is the two girls who clearly plan to dump their buckets on each other, but then one falls down and spills her bucket and the other, in an act of unbelievably quick and clever thinking, rushes over and dumps her bucket over herself as she straddles her friend, redeeming the whole situation and taking it to another level of excellence altogether.

However, what really intrigues me about the ice bucket challenge is that it's a manifestation of mass hysteria which just happens to be happening at the same time practically the whole world seems to be coming to a boil.
posted by jamjam at 11:02 AM on August 20, 2014 [8 favorites]


I'm seeing criticism about how much the ALS Foundation spends on research versus other efforts (public education, fundraising - note that it still has a 4-star Charity Navigator rating)... but it worked at bringing in people who otherwise wouldn't have thought about donating to ALS Research, yeah? In an ideal world maybe everyone would generously donate to causes that didn't spend any money to advertise themselves, but in the real world it takes more than that to engage people.
posted by Solon and Thanks at 11:04 AM on August 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


No ice bucket challenge discussion is complete without mentioning pro hockey player Paul Bissonnette. He turns it up to 11.
posted by cmfletcher at 11:05 AM on August 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


However, what really intrigues me about the ice bucket challenge is that it's a manifestation of mass hysteria which just happens to be happening at the same time practically the whole world seems to be coming to a boil.

Yeah, you've really nailed something on the head here (although I would classify this as something more faddish like goldfish-swallowing or phonebooth-stuffing).
posted by Nevin at 11:08 AM on August 20, 2014


When life gives you lemons, make ice cold lemonade?

Ice Cold Lemonade
posted by hippybear at 11:12 AM on August 20, 2014


I guess we can add peer pressure/coercion to the list of emotionally manipulative tools some nonprofits use to raise money. I'm sure that ALS is a perfectly sound charity, but it's frustrating me that a meme is now an effective marketing technique.

Wait have you seriously never been approached by Horrible Clipboard People or asked to participate or sponsor someone in a Charity Run or listened to NPR or watched PBS during funding drives?
posted by griphus at 11:13 AM on August 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


I'm seeing criticism about how much the ALS Foundation spends on research versus other efforts (public education, fundraising - note that it still has a 4-star Charity Navigator rating)... but it worked at bringing in people who otherwise wouldn't have thought about donating to ALS Research, yeah?

I guess my question is how much money does ALS research need, and would the money being donated to this cause be better spent on something like, I dunno, Ebola research. I doubt that this stunt is growing the philanthropic base in the country rather than just diverting money that would have been spent on charity elsewhere.

People aren't donating because they know or care what ALS is, they're just following some stupid fad that's going to be old in another couple of weeks. If they haven't been convinced that ALS research is an important cause, they're not going to continue to support and donate which is what you really need if you're a charity -- committed supporters.
posted by empath at 11:13 AM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


In an ideal world maybe everyone would generously donate to causes that didn't spend any money to advertise themselves, but in the real world it takes more than that to engage people.

What disgusts me are the "buy this product and we will donate $1 per purchase to $CHARITY up to $DOLLARAMOUNT" promotions.

Christ, just give the fucking maximum to the charity and then promote your company as "we gave a lot of money* to this charity, you should buy our product to say thank you".

*For most of these companies, the amount that is set as the maximum to give is probably a day or two worth of profit at most.
posted by hippybear at 11:15 AM on August 20, 2014 [5 favorites]


Charlie Sheen's take -- winning?
posted by Perplexity at 11:19 AM on August 20, 2014


I guess my question is how much money does ALS research need...

Is there any philanthropic goal you can't one-up with someone else's, depending on your priorities and sympathies? I assume if someone in a person's life is afflicted with ALS, they can honestly answer your question with "as much money as ALS research needs." If ALS isn't a factor in your day-to-day life then, yeah, sure, that money can be better spent funding something more relevant to you.
posted by griphus at 11:19 AM on August 20, 2014 [8 favorites]


I guess my question is how much money does ALS research need, and would the money being donated to this cause be better spent on something like, I dunno, Ebola research. I doubt that this stunt is growing the philanthropic base in the country rather than just diverting money that would have been spent on charity elsewhere.

Eh. I'm fine with this aspect, although I would be curious about the scientific credentials and efficacy of the research that the foundation sponsors. I'd imagine that the NiH would pump a lot more funding into ALS research if there were promising treatments in the pipeline.

Right now, we don't even have a good idea of what causes the disease, let alone how to treat it. We only figured out a few years ago that Stephen Hawking probably doesn't have ALS (almost solely based around the fact that he isn't dead).
posted by schmod at 11:20 AM on August 20, 2014


Next challenge: Swallow a Goldfish for Eating Disorder Research.
posted by Greg_Ace at 11:20 AM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


Wait have you seriously never been approached by Horrible Clipboard People

Oh gad the clipboard people. I try so hard to walk the line between not letting them interrupt me when I'm walking to work and still treating them like decent human beings, but they can be SO obnoxious.
posted by Night_owl at 11:25 AM on August 20, 2014


While some sort of Ebola vaccine would be great, what's really causing the outbreak right now is the utter lack of medical infrastructure in many communities in west Africa, where the outbreak is occurring.

If you think donating to ALS is diverting charity dollars away from Ebola, be sure to donate to an organization that is helping provide medical infrastructure in west Africa. Setting up medical facilities is the only way to stop the outbreak.
posted by Nevin at 11:27 AM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


My best friend's father died two years ago from ALS, and the ALS Association was a huge part of their lives from when he was diagnosed until his death. They were enormously helpful in helping her family come up with a plan before Hurricane Sandy when her father was on a respirator full time. While patient services, counseling, and support won't cure the disease, those things mean a lot to the families who are dealing with ALS.

The ALS Association didn't start this meme. It's attributed to friends and family of Pete Frates, a 29-year-old man living with ALS.
posted by gladly at 11:36 AM on August 20, 2014 [12 favorites]


Using a "meme" to make money is not a new thing. This may be the first time it has been done to successfully make money in the form of donations to a charitable cause. Memes making money for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis research > memes making money for record companies, auto manufacturers, etc.

The pressure to participate in the meme is terrible. I really hope that challengers and challengees can figure this out. I assume you generally challenge people you think will do the ice bucket challenge, and can afford to donate. This probably isn't the case.

The part of the video that has the guy who yells out "ALS!" while dumping ice water on an unsuspecting person is particularly horrible. But also kind of funny, in a gallows humor kind of way.

ALSA was pretty underfunded, and the disease was not very well known. Use of a meme to educate is a good thing as well, even if the education is somewhat sporadic. At least ALS has rampant name recognition, which should help with funding and research. My understanding is that research grants tend to go to the sexier causes.

On preview:
We only figured out a few years ago that Stephen Hawking probably doesn't have ALS (almost solely based around the fact that he isn't dead).
Not being dead is not a tip off for not having ALS. If you are familiar with how the disease works, and how it kills, then you may understand that the limiting factor is actually the amount of medical / scientific resources you have access to. Compete loss of all voluntary movement, and complete loss of all feeling, does not necessarily kill you. The body has limitations that machines can supplement indefinitely, in theory. That doesn't, of course, make up for the potential horror of having basically Locked-In Syndrome.

Full Disclosure: I have a very close family member that died of ALS quite recently, and I have done the ice bucket challenge.
posted by 90s_username04 at 11:36 AM on August 20, 2014 [3 favorites]


Oh, I don't begrudge the fact that this is making a very worthy charity a lot of money. I just dislike that it's spread into an "i'm gonna tag people I'm connected to on Facebook so they feel socially awkward in front of strangers if they aren't able to donate themselves" aspect. It's cut from the same cloth as the "I bet only 2% of my friends care enough to repost this glurge to prove they hate cancer" memes.

I don't have sound on the computer I'm on, so can someone confirm that Charlie Sheen's thing was a riff on "forget the whole song and dance about dumping a bucket of water on your head and just give them the fucking money if you were going to do that anyway".

Orlando Jones also had a twist on this.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 11:37 AM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


Clearly this is working to raise donations and has been enormously successful, so that's good, but I find the whole thing bizarre. It's like someone inadvertantly discovered an exploitable bug in the software of the human psyche.

"Excuse me, we are doing really important research on this disease. Would you consider donating?"

"No thanks."

"Okay, how about this: you donate to us plus you do something stupid and painful and post it on Youtube. Afterward you pressure your friends to donate and record themselves doing the same pointless thing."

"Woo-hoo! I'm in!"

This strategy worked. It worked. I'm seriously having to think about what the implications of that are for humanity/American culture.
posted by Pater Aletheias at 11:37 AM on August 20, 2014 [32 favorites]


. I try so hard to walk the line between not letting them interrupt me when I'm walking to work and still treating them like decent human beings, but they can be SO obnoxious.

I was once on a train with an entire gaggle of Clipboard People and their superiors and they were having a fucking pep rally right in the train car. At 8:30 AM. While I was hung over. I understand they are human beings just trying to get by in this world but mother of fuck that was horrible.
posted by griphus at 11:38 AM on August 20, 2014 [6 favorites]


Grrrr. If there's no ice in the goddamn bucket then you have failed the ICE BUCKET challenge. For all anyone knows you could be using warm water and defeating the entire purpose.

So much hate.
posted by Justinian at 11:43 AM on August 20, 2014


Next challenge: Swallow a Goldfish for Eating Disorder Research.

Before I clicked the link I seriously didn't know if this was a new Facebook thing or not. People are weird.
posted by desjardins at 11:52 AM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


"Okay, how about this: you donate to us plus you do something stupid and painful and post it on Youtube. Afterward you pressure your friends to donate and record themselves doing the same pointless thing."

I HAVE AN IDEA TO RAISE MONEY FOR TESTICULAR CANCER RESEARCH
posted by desjardins at 11:55 AM on August 20, 2014 [11 favorites]


I HAVE AN IDEA TO RAISE MONEY FOR TESTICULAR CANCER RESEARCH

Whatever you do, please involve the entire bag of jablonies.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 12:00 PM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


So, uh. I guess this has been going on for a while?
It's nice and cosy, here under this rock.
posted by Too-Ticky at 12:01 PM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


Too-Ticky perhaps you would be interested in the Rock Bucket Challenge which benefits concussion research
posted by prize bull octorok at 12:04 PM on August 20, 2014 [4 favorites]


Dubya.
posted by gman at 12:22 PM on August 20, 2014


I was talking to my boyfriend about this the other day, and came to the conclusion that it's actually a pretty brilliant bit of memetic engineering. (The form he encountered, and the one we agreed was the strongest, was "donate $100, or icewater and tag someone else".) Having the choice between "you can donate $100, or do the same physically unpleasant socially-visible thing I just did and then make someone else make the same choice" hooks into some of the primitive social-positioning bits of our monkey-brains, and is much easier to convince people to buy into than "you have to donate a lot of money, or donate a smaller amount of money and also pour ice on your head" - having to donate money no matter what is more likely to make people reject the premise and end the chain, while the ice-only strain is still useful because as long as everyone buys into the game and tags at least one person, eventually at least $100 gets donated no matter what.

The reason the current version is supplanting the $10 version is because it reproduces better and is thus outcompeting it - really a fascinating example of visible memetic evolution in action.
posted by NMcCoy at 12:28 PM on August 20, 2014 [6 favorites]


This strategy worked. It worked. I'm seriously having to think about what the implications of that are for humanity/American culture.

I don't think this is quite the same thing as peer pressure, though it's probably related. If a lot of other people are doing a thing in public, you get a sense of belonging to join in on it, even if the actual thing is embarrassing. Nobody would want to film themselves pouring a bucket of ice water over themselves and put it on YouTube, but many people are clearly eager to do the Ice Bucket Challenge. The fact that it is a thing makes it attractive.

I suspect that this is the same sort of mindset that is why civilization exists.
posted by kafziel at 12:49 PM on August 20, 2014


As someone who doesn't use Facebook or Twitter (YEAH THAT'S RIGHT I'M A SOCIAL MIPSTER Y'ALL) these crazes kind of seem like dispatches from an alien planet.
posted by threeants at 12:57 PM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


So in the US you draw attention to ALS by silly challenges. In the Netherlands we do it by showing video messages of people who died of it.
posted by MartinWisse at 1:00 PM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


The ice bucket challenge thing is stupid and I'm glad the mockery is finally showing up.

Of course it's stupid! Stupid is baked into dumping a bucket of ice water onto your head. That's why people do it.

The mockery also exists. In droves. Charlie Sheen, Chris Pratt, lots of celebrities and non celebrities. But it tends to be mockery that still honors the charitable cause rather than saying "DON'T YOU ALL GET IT THIS IS SO DUMB"

And when people who do not want to get involved do get involved, it's not the stupidity of the Ice Bucket Challenge, it's human nature. Feel free to respectfully decline.
posted by 90s_username04 at 1:14 PM on August 20, 2014 [5 favorites]


So in the US you draw attention to ALS by silly challenges. In the Netherlands we do it by showing video messages of people who died of it.

We're doing this, now? Okay then. The "silly challenge" has resulting in $31.5 million in donations to ALS research so far. How are your videos doing?
posted by kafziel at 1:25 PM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


$20, same as in town.
posted by dr_dank at 1:32 PM on August 20, 2014


In the Netherlands we do it by showing video messages of people who died of it.

This silly challenge has a very real person behind it. He's not dead yet, but he probably will be within the next year.
posted by gladly at 1:33 PM on August 20, 2014 [7 favorites]


You guys are seriously no fun at all. I know im going to get tagged soon and so are some friends so we plan to hike waaaay up in the mountains to a glacial lake and jump in.

No ice bucket challenge discussion is complete without mentioning pro hockey player Paul Bissonnette. He turns it up to 11.

Although this kind has kinda stolen our thunder. That is an amazing video and clearly everyone involved has spent far too much time watching TGR movies. I love it.
posted by fshgrl at 1:35 PM on August 20, 2014


Also I think one of the reasons it's so popular is a rare glimpse of celebrities at home. Watching Chris Pratts wife dump endless buckets of water on his head while giggling maniacally is pretty damn funny.
posted by fshgrl at 1:39 PM on August 20, 2014


Feel free to respectfully decline.

When it's your uncle who is asking you in a public forum which includes your cousins and another set of aunts and uncles, many of whom have already done this and are gleefully commenting about how they also want to see this, and considering that these are all the same people you will be seeing for Thanksgiving dinner in a couple months, "respectfully declining" doesn't always feel quite so easy.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 1:43 PM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


So in the US you draw attention to ALS by silly challenges. In the Netherlands we do it by showing video messages of people who died of it.

Well, it's been a long time coming, but that finally settles it: the Netherlands is better than America. Where should I mail the certificate and gift basket?
posted by griphus at 1:43 PM on August 20, 2014 [12 favorites]


The Netherlands
c/o The Netherlands
The Neverlands
posted by shakespeherian at 1:51 PM on August 20, 2014 [3 favorites]


Well, that does it. My boss just got bucketed on our store's Facebook page, with a surprise cake to the face ending.
posted by Night_owl at 1:59 PM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


I grew up doing something similar. It's a Finnish tradition, you cut a hole in the ice of a nearby lake or pond, have a nice sauna, and then jump in. Grab a beer, and repeat.
In the Philippines, we have a similar tradition of taking a bucket of cold water and dumping it on your head. It's usually a tub of rainwater and we also like to apply some soap to ourselves before hand.

When you live in a country without dependable indoor plumbing, it's called taking a bath.

oh, hey, can we create a waterboarding challenge to raise funds for the ACLU? Is that too modest a proposal?
posted by bl1nk at 2:23 PM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


I had to watch the original video again, just because I was in disbelief that none of these people died, or at least didn't become vegetables.
posted by DRoll at 2:41 PM on August 20, 2014


So in the US you draw attention to ALS by silly challenges. In the Netherlands we do it by showing video messages of people who died of it.

I don't even begin to understand the unspoken message behind your comment. Fundraisers need to be solemn affairs? A more bizarre basis for criticizing generosity and goodwill has yet to be found, probably.
posted by Mr. Six at 2:48 PM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


This past weekend, the fellow who "invented" the ALS ice bucket challenge died. From drowning.
posted by whyareyouatriangle at 3:14 PM on August 20, 2014


"..but it worked at bringing in people who otherwise wouldn't have thought about donating to ALS Research, yeah? "

hah yeah right so the measure of effectiveness of these campaigns has NOTHING to do with curing the diseases - it is entirely measured by its ability to be give enough money to continue being given money! This sort of bogus charity shenanigans just pisses me off. Why do they even NEED the general public to fund their research? If the research was really important and feasible I'm sure there would be some more rational and scientific way of distributing funds than this popularity contest.

So they do convince the public to give them some money and then they just blow the majority of it on marketing crap.
posted by mary8nne at 3:31 PM on August 20, 2014


Why is scientific research so often funded by these nonsensical marketing extravaganzas and popularity games. Is there no rational / scientific way to distribute research funding? Can't we get some scientists to look into that?

I would definately fund a scientific research group looking at ways to kill of popularity / charity based medicine research.
posted by mary8nne at 3:34 PM on August 20, 2014


Because government spending is scary.
posted by shakespeherian at 3:36 PM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


Is there no rational / scientific way to distribute research funding?

The way research funding is distributed is entirely different from the way it is raised. Government funding agencies and serious disease research charities, such as the American Cancer Society, use panels of expert scientists to make decisions about which grant applications should be funded. Depending on the agency, two to five experts are assigned to each do an intense and independent review of the grant application and write a report on it. Then a larger group of scientists discusses these reports and their own opinions on the applications, and rank the applications relative to each other. Usually the top-ranked applications are funded. These days, it's common to have a 10%–15% funding rate in North American biomedical research.

The problem is that there is not enough money to go around, either with charities or from government funding. So there is usually not a substantive difference in quality and prospects of the funded applications and the top unfunded applications. The distinctions are usually made on an arbitrary basis. Most reviewers will tell you that they could easily double the number of applications funded without any decrease in quality. Some of the unfunded applications are probably even better but with such limited funds they have to go with "sure things" rather than potential breakthroughs that are also potentially risky.

So, to answer your question: there is a rational way to distribute funding but it doesn't work because we don't have enough money to execute it. The only way to get the system to work is to get more money for health research.
posted by grouse at 3:57 PM on August 20, 2014 [8 favorites]


Metafilter: Half of these comments read as parody.
posted by ob at 5:01 PM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


I've only had two people I follow on Facebook do this. It is interesting.

Anyone who has ideas for a similar meme for neurofibromatosis research, please contact me! :)
posted by Fukiyama at 5:18 PM on August 20, 2014


Was there some sort of challenge that went on before this summer ALS research one? I distinctly remember some sort of jump-in-frozen-over-lakes video challenge this past wintet/spring, and until I read these the articles people have been posting, I thought the ice bucket was just a warm weather continuation of what had already been happening.
posted by Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug at 5:24 PM on August 20, 2014


ALS is a motherfucking horror of a disease and, as the kid in the video Lyn Never linked to explains, so few folks share the diagnosis at any one time (about 30,000 in the US right now?), pharmaceutical companies have little incentive to research drugs that would cure it. And also as he says -- it's so fucking scary you can't even imagine.

Every now and then I think just how ludicrous it is that there are non-profits raising money to fight diseases, from heart disease to cancer to diabetes to ALS, but this is how we live here and now.

One of my former students died of ALS a couple of years ago. http://www.allacesmedia.com/oftenawesome/ is an independent film documenting how things went for him more or less from diagnosis to death -- and the truly unbelievable group of friends who surrounded him and made it possible for him to continue living as his capacities were stripped away one by one.

ALSA does a lot to support folks who get diagnosed, as well as networking families and yes, raising awareness, in order to raise money for the cause. Is the meme stupid? Do people feel coerced? I can't give too many fucks. We live in such an imperfect society, and if this meme has really raised millions for ALSA, I'm for it.
posted by allthinky at 5:57 PM on August 20, 2014 [7 favorites]


Is the meme stupid? Do people feel coerced? I can't give too many fucks. We live in such an imperfect society, and if this meme has really raised millions for ALSA, I'm for it.

Hm.

Okay, there's another, far stupider thing that some kids are daring each other to do online - our flammable liquid on themselves and set it on fire.

Now, they're doing it for kicks alone. But what if THIS were the challenge? Would you still write it off as a meme from an imperfect world, and anyone's reluctance to comply as just "feeling coerced"?

And who is to say that those who are decrying this meme aren't donating anyway and are just unhappy about the forced public nature of something which they may prefer to keep private?

I agree that it is important to raise money for causes, this is a deserving one. But why do so in such a way that could leave a lingering bad taste in people's mouths in future years and sour them on donating after the meme has run its course?
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 6:34 PM on August 20, 2014 [1 favorite]


EmpressCallipygos: “My uncle actually tapped me for this challenge. I spent a good hour fretting about what I was going to do, because I don't have a reliable video recorder and I don't have all taht much to donate, and I was seriously agonizing over what I was going to do.”
I got put into a similar situation. I actually thought of this last week, and almost posted about it on Facebook. I wanted people to think about it. It's one thing for celebrities to challenge each other to put up money for a charity, but it's a really terrible idea to challenge your friends and neighbors. Now I'm glad I didn't because if I had there's a chance, a small but nevertheless non-zero chance, that I wouldn't have gotten to see that dipshit's two friends drop a garbage can full of water on him.
posted by ob1quixote at 6:48 PM on August 20, 2014


This is basically a vanilla descendant of neknomination, right?
posted by threeants at 6:51 PM on August 20, 2014


If people really cared about ALS, they could quit supporting football.
posted by persona au gratin at 7:11 PM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


My cousin just did this thing and put the video up on facebook.

"I'm doing the ice bucket challenge for awareness!" she says.
posted by phunniemee at 7:36 PM on August 20, 2014


Here is Flula doing the "Eyes Bucket" challenge.
posted by rossination at 7:39 PM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


"Okay, there's another, far stupider thing that some kids are daring each other to do online - our flammable liquid on themselves and set it on fire.

Now, they're doing it for kicks alone. But what if THIS were the challenge? Would you still write it off as a meme from an imperfect world, and anyone's reluctance to comply as just "feeling coerced"?


I... fail to see the relevance of this analogy. Under no circumstances do I want anyone setting fire to themselves or to anything that is ON THEM. Although I might have some sympathy for those who do it to protest unthinkable horrors like illegal wars. This is not that situation.

And who is to say that those who are decrying this meme aren't donating anyway and are just unhappy about the forced public nature of something which they may prefer to keep private?

Again, I'm not sure I see your point. I'm not condemning people who condemn the meme, just saying that, on balance, I think it's done way more good than harm.

I agree that it is important to raise money for causes, this is a deserving one. But why do so in such a way that could leave a lingering bad taste in people's mouths in future years and sour them on donating after the meme has run its course?"

It's hard to imagine that someone who was going to donate to ALSA will now decide not to, because hey, that ice bucket thing was awful. But even if there are some of those people, I think they probably are outnumbered by those who have given money that they wouldn't otherwise have thought to give. More good than harm.

And did I mention that this is a horrible, fucking disease that drug companies have no financial incentive to do R&D for?

In conclusion, at least it's not a fucking telethon.
posted by allthinky at 8:40 PM on August 20, 2014


Okay, lemme try another analogy - it feels like being at the Olympics and watching the shotput or something and suddenly you hear the guy on your country's team broke his spleen, and the coach randomly grabs you out of the stands and says "you! You do it for us!" And you're stuck feeling like you're a schmuck if you say no, but at the same time you're thinking "whoa, I just came to watch, this isn't fair. Plus there's a guy over there who's freaking out because he wants this, why didn't you ask for a volunteer instead?"

I may like shotput. I have no problem with shotput as a concept. I like watching it. That doesn't mean I want to COMPETE in a shotput match so PUBLICALLY, nor do I want anyone to try to persuade me TO do so.

Similarly - I like that so much money has been raised. What I DON't like is the fact that it is now public knowledge in my family that I was too broke to be part of that, because I like for that kind of information to be MY BUSINESS ALONE. And if my uncle hadn't been trying to think of someone to tag, no one WOULD have known.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 9:03 PM on August 20, 2014 [2 favorites]


What I DON't like is the fact that it is now public knowledge in my family that I was too broke to be part of that

You could have just sent $10 and no one would have been the wiser.
posted by fshgrl at 9:42 PM on August 20, 2014 [3 favorites]


hippybear: "For most of these companies, the amount that is set as the maximum to give is probably a day or two worth of profit at most."

One of the big cereal companies had one of these deals in Canada in the last couple years and the donation amount was ... $100,000 dollars. I bet they hit the limit somewhere around 10AM of the first day the boxes were on sale.

Justinian: " If there's no ice in the goddamn bucket then you have failed the ICE BUCKET challenge. For all anyone knows you could be using warm water and defeating the entire purpose."

To be fair a) it takes quite a bit of ice to turn a couple gallons of tap temperature water to 0C water so this may be merely a case poor planning causing insufficient ice application rather than an attempt at shirking and b) the presence of ice cubes in a bucket doesn't mean the water in said bucket is anywhere near 0C.
posted by Mitheral at 10:04 PM on August 20, 2014


The analogy to dousing yourself on fire or shotputting is not quite apt. This is the 2010's version of paying money to wear a colored wristband. In the late 90's you wore a colored rubber wristband to promote awareness. In 2014 you film yourself doing something conspicuous (and fairly harmless, despite what this video depicts) and put it on social media.

The Ice Bucket Challenge is dying. All of you that dislike it get your wish! It will be gone before you know it, like Psi's Gangnam Style. We have Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton being challenged. Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg, Elon Musk. Dave Grohl's over-the-top ice bucket has kind of jumped the shark. After this summer, there will be nobody left to challenge, and no more memetic avenue for ALS awareness.

The Ice Bucket Challenge is a peak meme-ness. Anybody doing it after August 30 will be seen as trying too hard. The money will have been raised and that will be it. Banner year for ALS funding over. Next year it will be back down to practically nothing. There! No more pressure, no more stupidity, no more need to hate on it because hating on it will also be passée. In a month, a person may haughtily stand over the Ice Bucket Challenge's weary, perhaps rotting corpse.
posted by 90s_username04 at 1:17 AM on August 21, 2014 [2 favorites]


I work in an institute that does a lot of ALS research, and we're now being strongly encouraged by our bosses to take part in this. The film will be used as publicity for our institute, and the money sent to one of the charities that funds our (and other institutes') work. In fairness, the director and lab heads are taking part too, but I can't help feeling we'd achieve more for ALS research by all volunteering to work through an extra lunch break or two. But that wouldn't let us show everyone on facebook how wacky and charitable we are.

/grumble

(This is more about my reflexive dislikes of enforced 'fun' and charity-as-performance than it is about any considered ethical position. ALS is a nasty disease that's poorly understood, and raising money for research is undoubtedly a good thing. I'm just a curmudgeon.)
posted by metaBugs at 1:19 AM on August 21, 2014 [1 favorite]


Coincidentally, this weekend Spokane has GleasonFest going on. A fundraiser for Team Gleason, which is named for Steve Gleason, ex-NO Saint player.

GleasonFest happens every year, and is a pretty decent fundraiser for an organization which helps provide cutting edge care for ALS patients.

It is this kind of ongoing annual event which is going to make the ultimate difference. This Ice Bucket Challenge thing is great, and the huge influx of cash, if it can be managed correctly, could lead to some excellent research or create capital for a foundation or whatnot. But yeah, the cash has to keep rolling in across time, not just through this viral campaign. Viral fades, ALS does not.

(Still, in terms of simply raising awareness, the IBC has done more to bring ALS into public consciousness than anything, possibly, since Lou Gehrig resigned from baseball.)

Incidentally, Gleason is good friends with Pearl Jam, and when the band played their first show in 20 years in Spokane (despite it being a city only 280 miles from Seattle), they allowed Gleason to create the set list. And he created one hell of a set list for that show. (That last link may only mean anything to Pearl Jam fans, but wow!)
posted by hippybear at 1:44 AM on August 21, 2014 [1 favorite]


You could have just sent $10 and no one would have been the wiser.

I could have done that anyway without this challenge being around, and I also would have enjoyed not having my cousins all "so, you gonna do this challenge, hmmmmmmmm?"

Who I do and don't give money to is my own fucking business. Play the game if you want, do the challenge if you wan't, but not everyone else wants to play, or be put on the spot about whether they're GOING to play.

And your harping on what I could and could not have done is just as bad. Because it is not your business either.
posted by EmpressCallipygos at 4:44 AM on August 21, 2014 [5 favorites]


This strategy worked. It worked. I'm seriously having to think about what the implications of that are for humanity/American culture.

This isn't anything new.

Something I've learned is that most people's lives are fairly monotonous. Also, most people don't get much attention from other people, perhaps they feel lonely, because their day-to-day is pretty ordinary.

This challenge breaks up that monotony, and it gives those people attention. I don't mean that in a cynical way, I just think people really underestimate how powerful it is to feel part of something.
posted by girlmightlive at 5:39 AM on August 21, 2014 [3 favorites]


I think EmpressCallipygos's viewpoint on this is 100% valid and important, and I hope she's not getting too much flack for it. I'm very pro-Ice Bucket Challenge, but I think the curmudgeonly response (I mean that very lovingly) is an important voice in this conversation. We really need to appreciate people that don't like to participate in gift exchanges or have Happy Birthday sung to them in restaurants. I am not being sarcastic. Perhaps a little facetious, but I really do mean it. (I hope this doesn't count as ad hominem?) We need to appreciate that pressure to participate in a public forum does not appeal to a good portion of our culture, and we should do our best to consider them and not to be tone deaf or to otherwise oust them.

We really should only challenge people we know will say "yes," correct? The best way to know that is to ask them in private, beforehand. Let's make that part of the etiquette?
posted by 90s_username04 at 8:20 AM on August 21, 2014 [7 favorites]


Several people have challenged me on facebook to do this. Have ignored them all. Until this morning when a friend messaged me a "reminder." I gently explained that there are things I do for charity (donations, volunteering and a cancer walk,) all of which are private and personal. With the possible exception of that cancer walk, I don't talk about any of it publicly.

Peer pressure for a good and noble cause is still coercive.

That said, it's nice to see people donating.
posted by zarq at 10:59 AM on August 21, 2014 [5 favorites]


I agree: my charitable donations are my own business.

When my college roommate challenged me, I kind of ignored it. But when my son got called out by a friend, I let him pour the ice water on both our heads. I wanted him to see that it's OK to get involved in stuff for Good Causes, just like we help out when the Scouts or USPS collect canned goods for the local food bank, or when the nearby town-owned farm needs field labor to collect vegetables for the same food bank. Sometimes you pitch in and help, even if it's symbolic.
posted by wenestvedt at 1:33 PM on August 21, 2014 [1 favorite]


Ice bucket challenge goes awry, firefighters hurt - Wherein two firefighters were injured when their ladder got too close to power lines while helping spray a marching band with cold water.
posted by achrise at 2:00 PM on August 21, 2014


When the water wars eventually happen all these Ice Bucket participants will be the first ones sacrificed for food. There's video footage of all of them.

I know I'm being a grump about this but when there are people who don't have access to clean water in this world and you have thousands of people gleefully posting videos of themselves wasting it.... I start to understand why people hate the west.
posted by AzzaMcKazza at 3:05 PM on August 21, 2014 [1 favorite]


An IBC participant has got nothing on people with lawns in areas where they have to water the grass. It's literally not even a rounding error in a months consumption of water for that purpose. And if you IBC over the lawn there is no change in consumption. Skip a single, short shower and you've conserved enough water to more than cover your bases. Heck I probably evaporate more water than this during an afternoon at the beach than is consumed by a challenge.

I get your point that people without clean water are going to see this as wasteful but IBC seems like a petty thing to put people against the wall for when the revolution comes especially in areas where clean water is plentiful. Every steak consumed "wastes" more water than this. Every Pound of Almonds consumed "wastes" more water than this. Your average water gun fight wastes more water than this.
posted by Mitheral at 4:40 PM on August 21, 2014 [3 favorites]


Still a waste.
posted by AzzaMcKazza at 5:02 PM on August 21, 2014


The Wicked Witch of the West also got fucked by the ice bucket challenge.
posted by gman at 5:09 PM on August 21, 2014


This is getting downright amusing.

Lindsay Lohan did it and called out Prince Harry.

Bill Gates did it and called out Elon Musk, Ryan Seacrest and Chris Anderson.

Wierd Al did it and called out Obama, the Dalai Lama and the Pope.

I like it.
posted by vapidave at 5:25 PM on August 21, 2014


I'm with those grumbling that it's wasting water and "calling out" people is fucking rude. Can't there be a saner way to make money than this thing? Plus oh, less concussion potential?

I have a neighbor with ALS, but she jumps out of planes at her fundraiser. But most people probably can't easily post THAT on YouTube and then make their friends find a plane.
posted by jenfullmoon at 6:53 PM on August 21, 2014 [2 favorites]


I think this is stupid, but the amount of water that's been used on this is basically a drop in the bucket (no pun intended).

It's roughly equal to a single toilet flush. Per person. One time.

It's not like the people on the east coast are going to pump their water to California in lieu of dumping it on their heads to amuse their friends on Facebook.
posted by schmod at 6:22 AM on August 22, 2014 [2 favorites]


But most people probably can't easily post THAT on YouTube and then make their friends find a plane.

I was wondering why the "Jump Out a Plane Challenge" wasn't as popular or as widespread as the "Ice Bucket Challenge," but if I'm following you correctly, you're saying that it's "easier" to dump ice water on your head than to jump out of a plane? I'm just trying to connect the dots here.
posted by (Arsenio) Hall and (Warren) Oates at 7:14 AM on August 22, 2014 [1 favorite]


the Pope

Could be a problem there.
posted by naoko at 8:26 AM on August 22, 2014


Kentucky firefighter remains critical after ALS Ice Bucket Challenge mishap, and no, it's not for the reason you'd expect it to be.
posted by PearlRose at 11:39 AM on August 22, 2014


I wonder whether throwing a little dry ice into the bucket too could make things more photogenic.
posted by jamjam at 2:47 PM on August 22, 2014




I wonder whether throwing a little dry ice into the bucket too could make things more photogenic.

The internet already did this for you.
posted by hippybear at 1:40 PM on August 24, 2014 [1 favorite]


Thank you, hippybear, that was pretty funny.
posted by jamjam at 2:01 PM on August 24, 2014


Finally a sane voice in the media pointing out how bad this whole thing is
posted by mary8nne at 8:03 AM on August 25, 2014


“Toddler Surprised By Ice Bucket Challenge Swears Harder Than a Sailor,” Mark Shrayber, Jezebel, 26 August 2014
posted by ob1quixote at 7:46 PM on August 26, 2014




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