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"... that man has never owned a Christmas tree. He's not a Christian. And I'm thinking, `Jeez, how can he represent me then?'"
July 10, 2002 8:09 AM   Subscribe

"... that man has never owned a Christmas tree. He's not a Christian. And I'm thinking, `Jeez, how can he represent me then?'"
Politician makes race easier for opponent by making stunningly awful remarks. The defacto George W. examples aside, does anyone have favorite instances of hearing politicians say something moronic and wondering if they actually knew recording devices were in the room?
posted by ice_cream_motor (35 comments total)

 
Is this a case of the media deciding there's a trend and then going out to find evdence supporting it, or does anyone else have a feeling that religion and politics are being tied even more inextricably of late? Can it be traced back to the us (presumably Judeo-Christian, prior to this article) v. them (Muslims) mentality that arose from 9/11?
posted by Sinner at 8:22 AM on July 10, 2002


"I've got 20 years invested in public service, and all of a sudden I'm a bigot and a racist," Callahan said.

Actually, yes.
posted by mcwetboy at 8:24 AM on July 10, 2002


Wouldn't it be easier to list the non-moronic political statements?
posted by dagny at 8:35 AM on July 10, 2002


Molly Ivins' books are full of wonderful missteps, like the Texas legislator who asked a group of handicapped citizens who were being feted to "stand up and be recognized."
posted by yerfatma at 8:39 AM on July 10, 2002


"Can it be traced back "

Yes, it can be traced back. Nixon hated Jews, just ask Billy Graham. :)

The Religious Right has been asserting themselves into politics with a fervor unmatched in modern history. The Republican Party has been the beneficiary of this zeal. Anyone read Scalia's recent comments on how he feels democracy is of secondary value to a good old theocracy? Anyone talked to a good ole' boy Southern Baptist lately? Anyone listened to Rush prattle on and on about how he has talent on loan from God? How about the way Ashcroft and Dubya keep saying our rights come from God, not from our Constitution and it's amendments?

9/11 has nothing to do with it, 9/11 only provides another convenient lever to create a theocracy in the US. After all, we're "one nation under God", aren't we?
posted by nofundy at 8:40 AM on July 10, 2002


Wouldn't it be easier to list the non-moronic political statements?

Ba-dum-dum!

Thanks for coming everyone! You've been a wonderful audience! Drive safely!
posted by ice_cream_motor at 8:40 AM on July 10, 2002


From another story about it, when his was trying to "clarify" his original comments:

"I am a Catholic who is pro-life and of Irish, Polish and German descent," Callahan said. "He is very much pro-choice and Hebrew. Enough said."

I share some of Callahan's background, and I'm disgusted with his attitude. Enough said.
posted by pmurray63 at 8:42 AM on July 10, 2002


"If standard English was good enough for Jesus Christ, it's good enough for the school children of Texas."

I don't remember who exactly said this -- a legislator of some sort, but I'm not sure at what level.
posted by tingley at 8:57 AM on July 10, 2002


"I've got 20 years invested in public service, and all of a sudden I'm a bigot and a racist," Callahan said.

or, err, suddenly you are exposed as a bigot and a racist. Heh. And besides all that...doesn't he know christmas trees are pagan anyways?

that "enough said" sort of *wink* *wink* 'we all know what i mean but i can't say it' bullshit disgusts me. God damned white christians. Always...well...you know.
posted by th3ph17 at 8:58 AM on July 10, 2002


in other news, american politics has finally beaten out american big business to become the most crooked institution ever.
posted by mcsweetie at 9:01 AM on July 10, 2002


"I mean, that man has never owned a Christmas tree. He's not a Christian. And I'm thinking, `Jeez, how can he represent me then?"' Callahan said Monday.

Ouch. There go any political ambitions I ever had.
posted by Yelling At Nothing at 9:05 AM on July 10, 2002


in other news, american politics has finally beaten out american big business to become the most crooked institution ever.
I dunno, looks like big business is still trying to win.
posted by iain at 9:15 AM on July 10, 2002


"My fellow Americans, I'm pleased to tell you today that I've signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever..."
posted by mr_crash_davis at 9:18 AM on July 10, 2002


Tingley: the quote is usually attributed to former Texas governor "Ma" Ferguson.
posted by Gilbert at 9:20 AM on July 10, 2002


"If standard English was good enough for Jesus Christ, it's good enough for the school children of Texas."

Ann "Ma" Richards, then-governor of Texas.

Boy, they've picked some winners.

...And on preview, I've been beaten to it. Although I stand by my submission of last name.
posted by nath at 9:23 AM on July 10, 2002


...And on doing some basic research, find that "Ma" Ferguson was also governor of Texas, some seventy years ago.

I still think Richards said it. Makes more sense, besides.
posted by nath at 9:26 AM on July 10, 2002


anyone have favorite instances of hearing politicians say something moronic and wondering if they actually knew recording devices were in the room?

Not 100% sure, but I have to say it's gonna take a lot to beat Jesse Jackson's 1984 all time fave: calling Jews "Hymies" and New York "Hymie-town" with not just a recording device in the room, but in front of thousands of people...
posted by JollyWanker at 9:44 AM on July 10, 2002


Nixon hated Jews, just ask Billy Graham.

actually nixon hated everyone. he just thought everyone was a jew. he used to call rehnquist "renchberg"!
posted by quonsar at 9:56 AM on July 10, 2002


The great thing about Nixon is that just when he starts to fade in people's minds as perhaps the most plainly racist president we've ever had, someone gets the FOIA request granted, more tapes are released and we're reminded once again.

Best Nixon quote as of late is when he tells one of his aides, preparing to meet with the NYT editorial board, "don't forget your Jewish beanie."
posted by risenc at 10:17 AM on July 10, 2002


Funny thing about this is that the man is actually a Democrat.
posted by themikeb at 10:22 AM on July 10, 2002


Funny thing about this is that the man is actually a Democrat.

Which just proves that stupidty knows no political boundaries.
posted by briank at 10:27 AM on July 10, 2002


I still think Richards said it. Makes more sense, besides.

Why does it make more sense? Richards was a liberal (for Texas) democrat, and therefore apparently less likely to make comments regarding Jesus and English language exclusivity. She is famous for saying, at a Democratic National Convention, "Ginger Rogers did everything that Fred Astaire did. She just did it backwards and in high heels."

The Jesus speakin' English comment is typically attributed to Ferguson.
posted by mr_roboto at 10:28 AM on July 10, 2002


does anyone have favorite instances of hearing politicians say something moronic and wondering if they actually knew recording devices were in the room?

bitch set me up.
posted by lescour at 10:39 AM on July 10, 2002


oh man, when did snopes start teh exit pop-ups?
posted by das_2099 at 11:28 AM on July 10, 2002


"Major League asshole"
"Yeah, big time"

Of course, the microphones were hard to spot that time...
posted by websavvy at 11:31 AM on July 10, 2002


The moronic behavior of the elected is directly related to the moronic attitudes of the electors.

"Ironic, isn't it Smithers? This anonymous clan of slack-jawed troglodytes has cost me the election. And yet, if I were to have them killed, I would be the one to go to jail. That's democracy for you." -- Mr. Burns, The Simpsons

:D
posted by UncleFes at 1:05 PM on July 10, 2002


crash_davis - yess!! Does anyone remember who made the song with that sample?
posted by dabitch at 1:07 PM on July 10, 2002


scratch that. found lists of songs like that.
posted by dabitch at 1:11 PM on July 10, 2002


nofundy: How about the way Ashcroft and Dubya keep saying our rights come from God, not from our Constitution and it's amendments?

Um....my rights don't come from the Constitution -- the Constitution exists to guarantee those rights I, as the Declaration of Independence says, have been endowed with by the Creator. Now, you may think differently, but consider this --

With a rather simple vote, this entire country could elect to establish an amendment to the Constitution that says "Nofundy has no right to free speech, or travel, or association, nor rights to redress of grievances, or..."

Does the Constitution suddenly revoke your rights? No -- it just stops securing them, which the Declaration of Independence also says. The Constitution is just the document explaining HOW it happens.
posted by dwivian at 1:11 PM on July 10, 2002


If you believe that your rights were given to you by a Creator, can you show me where you found them listed and explained? There are certainly no lists comparable to the Bill of Rights in the Bible, which is mainly concerned with proscriptive instructions.
posted by rushmc at 1:54 PM on July 10, 2002


Yes, again, Texas...in March 1990, Republican businessman and front-running gubernatorial candidate Clayton Williams guaranteed a resounding defeat by his opponent, the recovering alcoholic Ann Richards when he announced to rain-soaked reporters that "rain is like rape...once you know it's inevitable you might as well relax and enjoy it".
posted by Corky at 2:09 PM on July 10, 2002


relax and enjoy it

on my worst days of foot-in-mouth disease, i have never even come close to something like that. Unsuited for politics i am.
posted by th3ph17 at 2:18 PM on July 10, 2002


With a rather simple vote, this entire country could elect to establish an amendment to the Constitution...Does the Constitution suddenly revoke your rights?

No, the people revoke your rights. In the end, the government stands or falls based on the consent of the governed, and any human rights incorporated into the constitutional structure of the government stand or fall along with it. The argument that your rights are endowed upon you by a divine actor is interesting in a abstract, Platonic sense, but in the real world, this actor has very little to do with whether or not these rights exists (whether they are "secured", to use your terminology). If a person possessing divinely endowed human rights is the subject of a totalitarian regime, does that person, in real terms, possess any rights? Outside of purely pragmatic terms, there is no such thing as a right, for instance, to assemble freely. My government either allows me to assemble freely, or it does not. My "creator" has nothing to do with it.
posted by mr_roboto at 2:19 PM on July 10, 2002


With a rather simple vote, this entire country could elect to establish an amendment to the Constitution that says "Nofundy has no right to free speech, or travel, or association, nor rights to redress of grievances, or..."

The constitution cannot be amended by plebiscite or "rather simple vote." Constitutional amendments require a two-thirds vote by both the Senate and the House, as well as ratification by three-fourths (38) of the State Legislatures. [See Article V.]
posted by isobars at 3:15 PM on July 10, 2002


Good points nofundy. 9/11 put a mirror up to our society in many respects and the religious element which should have been criticized as an acceptable form of hate-speech has taken the lead. I think the situation is far from helpless and Bush and his religious cohorts (see: Ashcroft, Falwell) are only marginalizing themselves.
posted by skallas at 3:28 PM on July 10, 2002


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