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9/11 a poem by Robert Pinsky.
September 8, 2002 8:01 AM   Subscribe

9/11 a poem by Robert Pinsky. See also: a "guided anthology" to poetry and Sept. 11.
posted by xowie (21 comments total) 1 user marked this as a favorite

 
I prefer Leap by Brian Doyle.
posted by fleener at 8:21 AM on September 8, 2002


He lost me when he started talking about Will Rogers. Have to think about this some more.

I don't have very high hopes for most occasional poems, this one seems a little better than most.
posted by crunchburger at 8:27 AM on September 8, 2002


Thank you, fleener. I'd not seen it before. It's very good.
posted by mojohand at 8:56 AM on September 8, 2002


Here's the Billy Collins poem that was read at the symbolic meeting of congress in NYC Friday. It's called Names.
posted by CunningLinguist at 9:08 AM on September 8, 2002


Last September, USA TODAY "asked the five most recent poets laureate to each select a piece of their work that they believe has a message for these difficult times." These are, of course, less direct since they are being referenced in context rather than for the occasion itself.
posted by mblandi at 9:09 AM on September 8, 2002


Def Poetry Jam, Yo.
posted by Fupped Duck at 9:16 AM on September 8, 2002


Now you see first hand knowledge of a forced poem that deals in referents, allusion and political cartoon like Images. everything Pinsky does not write about. what a shameless man. His little poetry for the people tour a few years back was laughable. He even mentions Masons in a spooky way. I hope the ghost of Pound beats his butt silly in the after life.
posted by clavdivs at 9:31 AM on September 8, 2002


Another thank-you, fleener. Gorgeous and devastating. I wonder if the evocation of the phoenix in "the birds were on fire" was intentional?
posted by hippugeek at 10:13 AM on September 8, 2002


thanks fleener
posted by matteo at 10:43 AM on September 8, 2002


clavdivs, can you elaborate? What exactly about the poem and/or Pinsky in general gets your goat? I remember seeing him on TV a few years ago talking about the favourite poem project, which seemed admirable, but that's pretty much the extent of my knowledge about him.

By the way, is the position of Poet Laureate (or former Poet Laureate) one which carries any weight in the US? Australia doesn't have one, and I've often wondered if we're missing out.
posted by hot soup girl at 10:45 AM on September 8, 2002


AFAIK, the poet laureate in the US doesn't do much officially. S/He has a small office in the Library of Congress, and has a cool title, but that's about it. I think you have to look to the UK, their poet laureate gets/has to compose poems for things like royal birthdays & such.
posted by Vidiot at 10:58 AM on September 8, 2002


UK, their poet laureate gets/has to compose poems for things like royal birthdays & such.

and gets a case of the queen's wine, too

when Hughes died, they should have named Paul McCartney
posted by matteo at 11:05 AM on September 8, 2002


I thought it slightly interesting, but somewhat insipid - no real emotional connect (maybe it's just me).


Paul McCartney might have been an average poet laureate 30 years ago, but now? Andrew Motion has so far been a success (Paddington rail crash, Princess Margaret's death) and I am glad that Tony Blair has cut the appointment from the traditional lifetime down to 10 years.
posted by daveg at 12:16 PM on September 8, 2002


"when Hughes died, they should have named Paul McCartney'
that makes sence

"we adore images"
what bob?, like children at bedtime, Goethe when it hurts. A trite statement. he does not have the weight to claim We as he makes latter reference "the eye of the pyramid watching over us" Ohhh, satellites...
"hey folks its Descartes and the part-time satellites"
coming to the neaest library near you"

"18th century clarites"
hmm... juxa-huxtering the "neoplasm" (my pound referant)
personally, I think if Jefferson where alive He would take a 20mm cannon into congress and just sit down, let Adams take the offensive, Franklin with a half-smile saying:"whom shall be the indespensiable man"
AND WATCH THE M^$%^&^$$ CRINGE at the severity of what could face them in a divisive land.

i dont like the blood not needed referant and religion. no sheds blood like an american, none know how to clean it ALL up.

but thats me Hot soup girl. (nice nom de by the who)
posted by clavdivs at 12:51 PM on September 8, 2002


The US poet laureate is a loosely-defined position, more about promoting poetry in general than producing occasional poems. The term -- one year, renewable -- is too short to really develop a public profile. If asked to name a recent laureate, I suspect many Americans would name Maya Angelou, whose somewhat mawkish On the Pulse of Morning was read at Clinton's first inauguration; but she has never held the position. The only time before that in which poetry had a prominent quasi-official role, that I personally recall, was Reagan's quotation of High Flight speaking to the country after the shuttle accident.

Some 9/11 poetry resources (books, readings, etc.); and 36,000 poems posted online. There was even a temporary weblog for poems relating to September 11.
posted by dhartung at 4:50 PM on September 8, 2002


I must pause to say here that I still want to vomit when I read any poetry related to September 11, 2001. The supposed poetry which crossed my email box in the weeks following the attacks contained pathetic rhymes, maudlin sentiments, unsyncopated schemes, clich├ęd imagery, self-indulgent treacle, all of it the fakey, samey, depth-less, trite maunderings of an inspirationless half-caste of America's blissfully ignorant.

Thanks, dhartung, for linking to that archive. The gastric acid is eating away at the enamel on my teeth.
posted by Mo Nickels at 6:50 PM on September 8, 2002


clavd: what again? Pinsky just edges you out in lucidity, but you offer a generous repayment in ire...

I don't get the "Colonel Donald Duck" part.
posted by tss at 8:21 PM on September 8, 2002


dhartung: On the Pulse of Morning was read at Clinton's first inauguration; but she has never held the position. The only time before that in which poetry had a prominent quasi-official role, that I personally recall, was Reagan's quotation of High Flight speaking to the country after the shuttle accident.

At JFK's inauguration in 1961, Robert Frost was to read his "Dedication", but the glare from the sun blinded him. Instead, he recited "The Gift Outright" from memory. More information from the Library of Congress (scroll down.)
posted by Vidiot at 11:31 PM on September 8, 2002


clav: Hear Hear yo.

Poetry cannot be contrived. No matter how important the date 9-11 is.
posted by crasspastor at 11:47 PM on September 8, 2002


Oh yeah, I like DiFranco's myself. That is just me however.
posted by crasspastor at 11:50 PM on September 8, 2002


"Poetry cannot be contrived'
your stupid enough to believe that crass. i got your poem right here.

? Pinsky just edges you out in lucidity

the point, and you don't have a clue, is that Pinsky is not a lucid poet as you say. this poem is the worst forced tripe since that difranco shit crass is humping just to see if it will attract a crowd. I will not waste my energy to posit a rebuttal on Pinskys crap. I thought deriding a few of his stanzas is all about i'll eek out.

I don't get the "Colonel Donald Duck" part
oh, a quip on my political cartoon statement.

"Disney against the Metaphysicals" -Pound

plus the wimp pinsky cant find courageous words so he rips off Marianne moore (a collector of newspaper clippings and other minutia, which i think is cool)
posted by clavdivs at 8:24 AM on September 9, 2002


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