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Ludacris Barks Back At Pepsi...
September 10, 2002 8:06 PM   Subscribe

Ludacris Barks Back At Pepsi... Papa Roach does pornos, Britney is sluttier than ever, but they get the thumbs up. How did this happen?
posted by filecrave (27 comments total)

 
Obviously, the article/headline are shaped in such a way as to sculpt the conclusion of racism, but I'm really not sure. Bill may be an antique conservative, but attacking Ludacris is a lot different than attacking those other two. Papa Roach doing a porno is them appearing in an adult film, that most kids haven't heard of, and they probably didn't even have more than an incidental role (no idea here). And, Britney is a joke anyway and I'm not sure who she's able to sell music to anymore anyways.

Ludacris raps about bitches, blunts and 40s. Old staunchy conservatives aren't the only ones condemning the subjects and lyrics. Women especially aren't real big fans of his messages, and his messages are directly marketed at impressionable teenagers with no attempt to hide his lifestyle choices or put them in a negative light. Just, "if you want to be cool, emulate this."

Hate to agree with Bill, but it's not entirely ungrounded. Ludacris (as well as plenty of other rappers) makes himself a much easier target than some of the others.
posted by askheaves at 8:23 PM on September 10, 2002


Seems the story is less about whether Pepsi was grounded in pulling him, and more about why they did so only after Bill O'Reilley complained? It's a strange cause-and-effect, and I'll bet a nickel that there's more to the story (lots of angry parents, etc) to the story than MTV is letting on.
posted by risenc at 8:33 PM on September 10, 2002


I wouldn't drink Pepsi even if Jesus said it was great. Who honestly gives two shits about spokespeople for soft-drinks!?
posted by Dark Messiah at 8:35 PM on September 10, 2002


wow

I had no idea you could call him "luda"

Thanks VH1!
posted by delmoi at 8:53 PM on September 10, 2002


That's just ridiculous.


...
posted by dopamine at 8:56 PM on September 10, 2002


askheaves, I didn't see any indications that racism was an issue here. I saw a story in which someone who makes a poor role model was hired then fired as one.

There is apparently a myth that states that businesses have a responsibility to their customers. How anyone reconciles that with American Capitalism I don't know.
posted by wolfgangnorton at 8:56 PM on September 10, 2002


So wait, basically he's "formed a campaign called 'It's Got to Be Ludacris'" in the hopes that people will rally behind him to be reinstated as a spokesperson...and receive Pepsi's money? It's not like he's being prevented from making records here...a company is exercising its right to choose who represents it. If a company wants porn stars and slutty southern women representing them instead of misogynists, well then...that's their choice!
posted by arielmeadow at 9:00 PM on September 10, 2002


watch out for luda, the A-T-L intruda
posted by reverendX at 9:01 PM on September 10, 2002


I've always found Ludacris's zany, off-the-wall antics to be zany and off the wall.
posted by The God Complex at 9:04 PM on September 10, 2002


Responsibility to spokespersons under contract seems more the issue here, and generally, corporations have little to none. They work at the pleasure of the company, and if they are seen as promoting the brand in a positive light, they continue to work. Controversy, no matter how overstated, is anathema.
posted by dhartung at 9:05 PM on September 10, 2002


"It's Got to Be Ludacris" is far too long a slogan for any campaign. The man obviously lacks the proper sales instincts, no wonder Pepsi decided to drop him.

This is a non-issue, but I guess high school fans have a lot of free time on their hands. So if helping Ludacris keeps them off the streets and out of the skateboard parks, well golly, I'm all for it.
posted by Salmonberry at 9:06 PM on September 10, 2002


Oh, and [one more thing]: Players govern players. Spectators form opinions.

Word, Luda. I want him to intensify this controversy as much as possible, for the sheer joy that will be a Ludacris song rapping and insulting Bill O'Reilly.
posted by Stan Chin at 9:07 PM on September 10, 2002


arielmeadow, I read it as Ludacris seeing the light about how Pepsi was using him to reach young black kids, instead of him trying to pressure Pepsi into hiring him back:

At one time, I helped Pepsi to navigate their product through the inner-city communities that are vital to their sales. Over the past few days I have rethought my approach as to how I do business and retained a team to ... take the power back for the good of the hip-hop community.

Guess we'll see how serious he is when/if corporate soft drink money comes knocking again.
posted by mediareport at 9:11 PM on September 10, 2002


wolfgangnorton: I get the racism thing because it seems to be the crux of the headline, as well as the people who were on the factor right after that and their claims... at the same time, grouping all rap together under the umbrella of Ludacris. And, it is funny that PepsiCo took the action right after the publicity that a Bill O'Reilly outcry seems to generate.

In the past, they've had Busta doing Dew commercials, and he could be grouped under the same rap umbrella. They had no problems there.

And "It's Got to Be Ludacris"?!?! How self indulgent is that?
posted by askheaves at 9:15 PM on September 10, 2002


Stan: I'm hoping it gets so bad that Bill O'Reilly cuts a track rapping and insulting Ludacris.
posted by risenc at 9:25 PM on September 10, 2002


risenc: I'm thinking remix of "What's Your Fantasy" in an all-out rhyme war between Luda and "Da Factor".
posted by Stan Chin at 9:39 PM on September 10, 2002


It's okay everybody, his new single really sucks anyway.

Ultimately, Ludacris isn't saying anything that can be taken seriously, given the context it's being said in. When NWA rapped about bitches and blunts and 40s they were actually rapping about their lives. When someone like Ludacris does it, he's rapping about album sales, and chances are most of America only recognizes that spectacular hair, and wouldn't be able to name one of his songs if you offered them a Pepsi to do it. Until I saw this, I actually had wondered at times whether Bill O'Reilly was a satirical character, a Modest Proposal sort of thing coming from Fox. I didn't realize anyone took him seriously, let alone a company has built its brand on being hip, trendy and forward thinking. Pepsi, you don't deserve that sans-serif logo!
posted by renderthis at 9:51 PM on September 10, 2002


It's pretty easy for a 14 year old, struggling with puberty and identity, to take what Ludacris says seriously. Many of his followers don't know what NWA means... considering they're not allowed to say or hear any word that closely resembles the 'N' in NWA.

How do I be cool and have good things happen to me? I emulate somebody who obviously has all that going on... the confused youth says. How powerful Ludacris is in this context is another issue, but he's still a voice with a message that gets listened to.

And Bill O'Reilly? I watch his show late at night when nothing is on and I can't sleep. I find it humorous. He's halfway ignorant, and halfway right, but I still respect that he has his own show, gives his opposition the last word, and reads his hate mail on the air with minimal talkback. And every time I watch, I keep thinking of the SNL impression of him... it's soooo right.
posted by askheaves at 10:01 PM on September 10, 2002


I find Pepsi with their "Spokespeople" really tedious. It always strikes me that they try far too hard to capture "cool". They always jump on a bandwagon just as it starts to decline. I've got to agree with Dark Messiah. Who gives a shit? It's bad advertising for a bad product.
posted by jontyjago at 2:21 AM on September 11, 2002


My main point in posting the article though, was not to say pepsi shouldn't have dropped "luda", because, though I am a fan of hip-hop music and I like for people to "check out the oil my cadillac spills" every now and then, I agree that it was nothing more than a smart business move to get rid of him as a spokesperson.

My argument and direction I was trying to take the thread was, that if he goes, then why not Papa-Roach or Britney?
posted by filecrave at 5:16 AM on September 11, 2002


Pepsi repeats itself.
posted by ?! at 5:36 AM on September 11, 2002


What do you mean that Britney is "sluttier than ever"? Is this because of her non-Taliban approved attire? Or are you aware, first hand, of her being involved in promiscuous sexual relations with many many partners?

Just wondering.
posted by glenwood at 6:48 AM on September 11, 2002


Can we get O'Reilly to speak out against AT&T's use of Carrot Top as a spokesperson next? I'm sure he's sending some kind of negative message to the youth of today.
posted by picea at 7:41 AM on September 11, 2002


What do you mean that Britney is "sluttier than ever"? Is this because of her non-Taliban approved attire?

- It's because of her "non-Taliban approved attire". But hey I may be wrong. Maybe she only dresses like that so guys won't look at her.

Or are you aware, first hand, of her being involved in promiscuous sexual relations with many many partners?


- Well she surely got that boob job done for something. If not, what a waste. Again, I could be wrong about her, but if she's not she should at least be nominated for an Oscar for looking and dressing the part.
posted by filecrave at 3:24 PM on September 11, 2002


I don't watch O'Reilly, and don't know much of his show or views.

I agree with O'Reilly's complaint, and with AskHeaves:

Ludacris raps about bitches, blunts and 40s. Old staunchy conservatives aren't the only ones condemning the subjects and lyrics. Women especially aren't real big fans of his messages, and his messages are directly marketed at impressionable teenagers with no attempt to hide his lifestyle choices or put them in a negative light. Just, "if you want to be cool, emulate this."


The Madonna thing is different, because her lyrics did not advocate violence, misogyny or alcohol abuse.
posted by 4midori at 4:05 PM on September 11, 2002


No, Madonna just showed a burning cross, a black Jesus, and these lyrics.

"When you call my name it's like a little prayer
I'm down on my knees, I wanna take you there
In the midnight hour I can feel your power
Just like a prayer you know I'll take you there."

Pepsi knew what Ludacris rapped about before hiring him. The Pepsi advertising program is simple:

IF SPOKESPERSON FANS > PROTESTORS THEN PAY $ ELSE DROP CONTRACT
posted by ?! at 6:28 PM on September 11, 2002


Black Jesus? Maybe it was Saint Martin de Porres. (See what happens when I read MeFi aloud to my wife?)
posted by allaboutgeorge at 11:59 PM on September 11, 2002


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