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The Mars Gravity Biosatellite Project
September 18, 2002 10:15 PM   Subscribe

The Mars Gravity Biosatellite Project is an unmatched international effort that pools top-notch technical talent from MIT, the University of Washington in Seattle, and the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia. The mission is nothing short of groundbreaking. The plan is to build a spacecraft capable of housing a small crew of mice, including pregnant females, which will simulate the gravity of Mars to determine its effects on mammalian development.
posted by David Dark (9 comments total)

 
Cool.
posted by David Dark at 10:16 PM on September 18, 2002


I smell a lawsuit...

Make that two lawsuits...
posted by Smart Dalek at 10:24 PM on September 18, 2002


very cool. although i suppose there will be some objections from the peta posse.
posted by donkeyschlong at 10:32 PM on September 18, 2002


wait til they do it with chimps. :)
posted by David Dark at 11:15 PM on September 18, 2002


Now you've got me excited. ;)
posted by donkeyschlong at 12:38 AM on September 19, 2002


Is it april 1st.
posted by johnnyboy at 1:59 AM on September 19, 2002


"Earthman, the planet you lived on was commissioned, paid for, and run by mice..."

Hey, if the mice are jumping ship, I think we need to start worrying...
posted by jiroczech at 2:02 AM on September 19, 2002


I feel like I already know the effects from reading so many scifi books. Can't they just read them like I did?

What, those writers really don't know? That they're just hypothesizing? Damn them! I've been lead to believe so many things! Oh, right, the fi stands for fiction. Now my whole world is shattered.
posted by evening at 5:58 AM on September 19, 2002


"This will be the longest rodent mission ever flown," Wooster said.

Now there's something to shoot for . . . .
posted by LeLiLo at 9:08 AM on September 19, 2002


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