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Centennial of Flight
April 25, 2003 7:05 AM   Subscribe

Centennial of Flight [more]
posted by hama7 (14 comments total)

 
Don't miss the extensive photograph database.
posted by hama7 at 7:05 AM on April 25, 2003


Thanks, hama7!
posted by plep at 7:17 AM on April 25, 2003


It's also the centennial of Samuel Cody's Cody Kites. The 'war-kite' capable of lifting a person into the air to observe enemy movements was patented on November 21, 1903.

Cody was orignially a Texan who, after failing to interest the US Navy in the applications of his kite, went to England where, after achieving some notability with his people lifter, also designed and flew the first plane in England in 1908.
posted by KnitWit at 8:12 AM on April 25, 2003


*pre-emptive double post callout for when someone posts this on December 17*
posted by Vidiot at 8:16 AM on April 25, 2003


There are a lot more photos and information here and here. This one is my favorite shot. And here is another 100th anniversary site.
posted by MegoSteve at 8:20 AM on April 25, 2003


Oh for god's sake, "inspired by freedom". Really?...

Lots of nice stuff here, but having listened to aviation pioneer Burt Rutan talk in Portland here a few weeks ago, it wasn't freedom that seemed to inspire him, just a visceral passion to take flight, confound convention, and deign beautiful things.

Spare us the jingoistic mantras, thanks.
posted by marvin at 9:19 AM on April 25, 2003


erm, I meant design
posted by marvin at 9:21 AM on April 25, 2003


I think the "freedom" they're talking about is the Freedom of flight.

Ask any pilot. They'll tell you.
posted by bondcliff at 9:33 AM on April 25, 2003


I've just written a piece for a high school in Dayton, OH in celebration of the Centennial. In researching the story, I've grown really impressed with the Wright Brothers' achievements. Their development of powered flight spanned 6 or 7 years of dedicated effort and systematic testing of their ideas. It's a good story. The Smithsonian was antagonistic for many years afterward, which is a sad part of the tale.
posted by gsalad at 10:55 AM on April 25, 2003


Actually, the centennial has already passed.
posted by scottymac at 11:31 AM on April 25, 2003


I think the "freedom" they're talking about is the Freedom of flight.

Ask any pilot. They'll tell you.


Maybe, but given that its a goverment site I suspect it's Freedom with a big 'F'. (BTW, I used to fly sailplanes and built a hang-glider out of bamboo and polythene back in the very early '70's)
posted by marvin at 12:39 PM on April 25, 2003


Spare us the jingoistic mantras, thanks.

*rolls eyes*

I think you're reading into it, Marvin. Please don't turn this non-political thread into moral indignation. Please?

Nice links Hama and MegoSteve.
posted by dhoyt at 12:43 PM on April 25, 2003


non-political thread into moral indignation. Please?

OK. Nuff said. I love aero engineering, hate politics. Saving my outbursts for the car.
posted by marvin at 5:30 PM on April 25, 2003


Centennial of 'flight'? I know the anti-French thing is endemic in the USA, but I seem to remember the Montgolfiers doing something that would qualify as 'flight' by most rules. And so does the commemorative site. Centennial of mechanically-powered flight, perhaps.
posted by riviera at 1:24 AM on April 26, 2003


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