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101 Ways to Save the Internet
December 31, 2003 1:52 PM   Subscribe

101 Ways to Save the Internet... 102 Stop listlessly posting Wired articles to Metafilter. Oh dagnamit.
posted by feelinglistless (17 comments total)

 
103 And particular articles which have a massive banner advert telling me I have two messages waiting when I clearly haven't.
posted by feelinglistless at 1:54 PM on December 31, 2003


#16: Simplify Web publishing: Why can't we post files from our desktop to a Web site in one drag-and-drop move?

Um...we can. Or is this some sort of super-secret, Code-Q clearance trick that nobody told WIRED about? Hell, if anything, we need to make it HARDER to publish to the Web...too damn many Freepers and DU-ers and bloggers out there, consarn it!

But seriously -- how can WIRED believe that "web publishing" is difficult in the age of blogs, Windows XP file-sharing, etc? In XP Explorer, I can literally drag-n-drop a file from my hard drive to my website.
posted by davidmsc at 2:27 PM on December 31, 2003


I think the operative word in #16 is "simplify." I can't say that setting up an entire self-updating blog/publishing site is particularly simple for everyone.
posted by Down10 at 2:35 PM on December 31, 2003


39 Upgrade to IPv6 The next-gen Internet protocol will improve security and add 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,427,473,244,160 IP addresses - enough for everything, ever.

And 640K should be enough for anybody.
posted by Foosnark at 2:48 PM on December 31, 2003


102. A cheap wireless router that has a firewall and bandwidth throttle so you can share x amount of bandwidth with strangers on port 80 (or whatever else you want to share).

Does this thing exist yet?

A few issues with the list.

He mentions P2P a lot. P2P sucks, its slow and unreliable. I think the success of bittorrent has gotten to his head. I'd hate to make 100+ connections to desktops (running at who knows what speeds or loads) all around the world to download a website.

He wants this email/IM uber-app but decries vendor lock-in later on with microsoft. One or the other, Paul. I much prefer seperate apps. Not to mention Outlook XP pretty does this with Exchange using MSN messenger.

The "more ads for Centrino than hot spots" line is an instant classic.
posted by skallas at 2:54 PM on December 31, 2003


Ehhh. This is more a list of "101 things that Paul Boutin is vaguely irritated about today but can't be bothered to think about or investigate".

The Centrino quip is humorous, though.
posted by hattifattener at 3:11 PM on December 31, 2003


#2 translates "Sell things below cost and make it up on volume." Frankly that makes more sense sandwiched between "Collect Underpants" and "Profit!" than on ahem a serious list of improvements to the internet.
posted by ilsa at 3:49 PM on December 31, 2003


Sorry, I felt no need to read past #3.
posted by ilsa at 3:51 PM on December 31, 2003


As for #2: In a digital medium the cost line actually moves with volume: You're not selling physical things here, the only additional costs you'll have is bandwidth. He does go a little hog wild over P2P however, with things like #42 in which he recommends we P2P our network services. (Which is not the answer to life, the universe, or in this case the netowrk services model.) He says we should do this because the client-server model is more vulnerable to attack. That's complete bull. A security hole is a security hole, no matter how many servers the data is stored on.
posted by woil at 4:00 PM on December 31, 2003


My first thought when I read that article was "the internet needs saving?"
posted by drezdn at 5:07 PM on December 31, 2003


My second was, magazines really get lazy with the last issue of the year.
posted by drezdn at 5:07 PM on December 31, 2003


Please do stop listlessly posting Wired articles to MeFi. Post them passionately, enthusiastically, or enragedly and defiantly, disputing every line. We, your comrades at Wired, do not support listlessness [grin].

For the record, drezdn, the Boutin piece is in the first issue of 2004, and last year's December issue, on science and religion, was one of the best of the year, in my opinion.
posted by digaman at 5:15 PM on December 31, 2003


I consider the Jan. issues the last issues of the year, because the Jan issue is the one on sale at the end of the year. Having said that, I did read the article all the way through and finally brought myself around to subscribing to Wired.

Magazines in general just seem to get obsessed with lists at the end of the year.
posted by drezdn at 5:20 PM on December 31, 2003


Foosnark-

That number is on the order of 10^38. More than the number of atoms in our solar system. I think it is probably enough static IP's.
posted by McBain at 2:05 AM on January 1, 2004


94 Tell Kelly on Geocities to take down her Macarena tribute page It's over, Kel. -- this one i really liked! (but are some good ideas there)

and for January issues of monthly magazines--they're produced in November usually, and the Feb. issues are really the last ones produced in the year before.
posted by amberglow at 9:53 AM on January 1, 2004


In XP Explorer, I can literally drag-n-drop a file from my hard drive to my website.

Whoa... why have I been using this FTP client? Thanks!
posted by skryche at 10:21 AM on January 1, 2004


102. A cheap wireless router that has a firewall and bandwidth throttle so you can share x amount of bandwidth with strangers on port 80 (or whatever else you want to share). Does this thing exist yet?

SnapGear has a firewall box for under $200 that will do throttling, but you'd still need a wireless access point on top of that. Still, that's a lot cheaper than it used to be.
posted by kindall at 11:45 AM on January 1, 2004


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