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Kentucky cracks down on budding writer
March 3, 2005 6:42 AM   Subscribe

Write about zombies, go to jail. I'd be really pissed at the grandparents, if I were this kid.
posted by Thorzdad (90 comments total)

 
That's really sad but kind of funny too. Zombie terrorist threat!
posted by agregoli at 6:45 AM on March 3, 2005


"It was about a high school over ran by zombies."

Sounds like somebody was a zombie during English class. Good luck with that writing career, pal.
posted by soyjoy at 6:46 AM on March 3, 2005


"Student Arrested For Terroristic Threatening Says Incident A Misunderstanding"

Speaking of zombie grammar, what is "terroristic" (from the headline)?

"Mmmm, zombie journalist like brainerific subject matter..."
posted by tpl1212 at 6:50 AM on March 3, 2005


One of my teachers had us write horror stories for creative writing class in HS and 90% of them involved the destruction of the school and the gory deaths of the entire math faculty and every member of the student government. Surprisingly none of them came true. Close escape I guess.

I'd be beyond pissed at my grandparents if I were this kid. Especially since they apparently refuse to bail him out.
posted by fshgrl at 6:51 AM on March 3, 2005


Damn, I'm glad I'm no longer in school...when I was in grade five, I wrote a story about my entire class and I going to an amusement park and dying in a roller-coaster accident, complete with a drawing of headstones with my and my classmates names on them. In 1983, my teacher loved it and praised my creativity. In 2005, I'd probably be suspended, hauled off to therapy and, if I were old enough, charged with "uttering terrorist threats" or some such nonsense.

If I were this kid, I'd be pissed at everyone for being so goddamned stupid.
posted by The Card Cheat at 6:56 AM on March 3, 2005


Awesome! i knew all those hours playing "Resident Evil" would pay off! now i am 'anti-terrorist' trained!
woot!

I particularly liked :

"... (and) the short story they found was about zombies. Yes, it did say a high school. It was about a high school over ran by zombies."

Even so, police say the nature of the story makes it a felony. "Anytime you make any threat or possess matter involving a school or function it's a felony in the state of Kentucky," said Winchester Police detective Steven Caudill.

note to self: avoid kentucky...oh wait...that was already on my list...
posted by das_2099 at 7:00 AM on March 3, 2005


On Thursday, a judge raised Poole's bond from one to five thousand dollars after prosecutors requested it, citing the seriousness of the charge.

w...t...f !?!?
posted by gren at 7:07 AM on March 3, 2005


Not enough information on this...google news only shows a few articles, most of them the same as this one. Note that the police said nothing about zombies, that was the kid's statement.

Sorry, but I can't believe that the local police and prosecutor's office can't tell the difference between a work of fiction and a threat.... they've got better things to do besides use tax money to bring charges against a kid for a bad english paper.

I think I'll hold my opinion on this until there is some in depth information... or, perhaps I just don't care and won't think about it again...
posted by HuronBob at 7:07 AM on March 3, 2005


also, who is grammar checking at that paper?

"possess matter involving a school"

i am not sure what that means...does that mean any matter that is school-related?

Notebooks? Pencils?
posted by das_2099 at 7:11 AM on March 3, 2005


If they arrested every kid who ever wrote a story where zombies or aliens or pissed-off Mexicans terrorized a high school, we wouldn't have such problems with school overcrowding. Good on 'em!
posted by uncleozzy at 7:11 AM on March 3, 2005


""My story is based on fiction."

I say, lock him up just for writing that sentence.
posted by cedar at 7:12 AM on March 3, 2005


Speaking of zombie grammar, what is "terroristic" (from the headline)?

Looks like the 'zombie' phenomenon is spreading - as it always does.

"Terroristic," since you ask, is an adjective formed from the word "terrorist." It's perfectly grammatically correct. It is the widely used phrase "terrorist threats" that is technically ungrammatical.
posted by soyjoy at 7:16 AM on March 3, 2005


America is not a Fascist country.

They speak German in Fascist countries.

And show us your national ID card, Citizen!
posted by orthogonality at 7:17 AM on March 3, 2005


perhaps I just don't care and won't think about it again...

A wonderful attitude to take, considering that if this is true, the implications are terribly frightening. Says a bit about the state of the US right now, no?
posted by dead_ at 7:20 AM on March 3, 2005


"It didn't mention nobody who lives in Clark County, didn't mention (George Rogers Clark High School), didn't mention no principal or cops, nothing,"

Ah... so it did mention somebody who lives in Clark County and it did mention (the) principal or cops by name...
posted by jpburns at 7:22 AM on March 3, 2005


"Anytime you make any threat or possess matter involving a school or function it's a felony in the state of Kentucky," said Winchester Police detective Steven Caudill.

Hey, Steve, here's a suggestion: get some BRRRAAAAIIIINSSS!
posted by SPrintF at 7:24 AM on March 3, 2005


also, who is grammar checking at that paper?
"possess matter involving a school"


Um, that's a quote, das_2099. Journalists should not alter the grammar of quotes. And again, as it happens, it's perfectly grammatical: "Anytime you make any threat or possess matter involving a school or function it's a felony in the state of Kentucky." What it is not is sensical, since as you point out, there's a wide range of "matter involving a school" that is not felonious, and that's not even addressing matter "involving a function." The journalist should probably have elicited a clarifying quote, added something outside of it or paraphrased to clarify what the detective meant - but the grammar of the phrase is absolutely fine.

Next!
posted by soyjoy at 7:25 AM on March 3, 2005


Someone needs mail the Winchester Police The Zombie Survival Guide so they can protect us against those evil terrorist zombies!
posted by Hot Like Your 12V Wire at 7:27 AM on March 3, 2005


So, does that mean that all movies, stories and etc that suggest violence are terroristic (sic)? That all Hollywood horror movies, especially the many that involve high school kids, are now fair game for "fatherland security"?

Or maybe it's only if kids write them?
posted by Red58 at 7:33 AM on March 3, 2005


they've got better things to do besides use tax money to bring charges against a kid for a bad english paper.
-posted by HuronBob

never lived in a small town, have you, bob?
posted by es_de_bah at 7:33 AM on March 3, 2005


hunh. I just learned that grammatically correct and sensical are not the same thing. I wonder for how long I have carried that misconception?
posted by das_2099 at 7:37 AM on March 3, 2005


HuronBob might just be on to something. The news article just quotes the kid's claims, not the actual material in question.

And I have to admit, the lad's use of double negatives leaves me in doubt as to his ability to correctly characterize his written work.

But it's still stupid. What is all this about locking up kids who write stories? Jeez, get them counselling if it seems warranted, and if they're assessed as being a danger to themselves or others, proceed from there.
posted by orange swan at 7:40 AM on March 3, 2005


terroristic (sic) (sic)
posted by soyjoy at 7:42 AM on March 3, 2005


This is inane. When I wrote my "kill everyone in my junior high story," I bought five minutes with the counselor, who said, "You got angry, wrote a story, then felt better? That's perfectly healthy, go back to class." My best friend and I then sold copies of the famous story on the playground for a nickel (what getting busted will do for demand).

Thank jeebus I got out of school before Columbine & September 11.
posted by dame at 7:44 AM on March 3, 2005


...stepped into the Blue. Something strange was in the air. It smelt of rot and decay. It could mean only one thing: Zombies have invaded MetaFilter.

"I ain't gonna let no zombies take MeFi!" I shouted as I reached for my trusty shotgun. From down the hall, I heard a moaning. They were already in the Grey. I was too late.

"Noooo!" I cried, wiping tears from my eyes with my gloved hand. I decided to just let the Grey fall and make my last stand protecting the Green. Lowering my gun, I waited, hearing the shambling scrapping of zombie toes on keyboards come closer..

posted by robocop is bleeding at 7:50 AM on March 3, 2005


"Mmm! It's Terroristic!"

I think instead of going after this poor bad writer the authorities should go after the zombies themselves. After all, the zombies were the ones depicted attacking the school. Because if Kentucky cannot prosecute fictitious characters for crimes that never happened, well... that's not an America I'd care to visit.
posted by Fuzzy Monster at 7:50 AM on March 3, 2005


I made a video in my high school media class where terrorists take over the school and my friends and I kill 'em. It was hilarious then. We made it about a month before Columbine and after that happened we "lost the tape." I think I still have a copy around here somewhere. Ahh, high school. The Culture of Fear is hard at work.
posted by sciurus at 7:55 AM on March 3, 2005


I just learned that grammatically correct and sensical are not the same thing. I wonder for how long I have carried that misconception?

Dunno, but here's another example: Metafilter carjacked my quizzical sunspots.

And for even more fun in that vein, here's an infinite supply of phrases that are both grammatically correct and nonsensical.
posted by soyjoy at 7:59 AM on March 3, 2005


I think we have another arrest to make:


http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/item.asp?Item=978227723439&Catalog=Books&N=35&Lang=en&Section=books&zxac=1

He's lucky that he don't live in kentuckah.

As an addenedum: This kid is being kept in a cement box by a group of obviously retarded hicks for writing a simple story about his highschool being overun by zombies. This is not an uncommon plot variation for highschool english papers. The 'judge', the calm voice of reason, not a beat cop, pronounces the charge super serious and quadruples the bail. And you guys are going on about grammar? I think intellectual problems inherent to this situation begin somewhere much further down the hierarchy than the finer points of proper syntax in English. Don't it ;?
posted by randomnfactor at 8:00 AM on March 3, 2005


So I'm assuming that if George Romero or Zack Snyder ever stepped foot in Kentucky they would be hauled off to prison never to see the light of day? Or are movie directors automatically exempt from being assumed terrorists because they aren't angsty teenagers? I guess I should probably brush up on the law of the 21st century.
posted by JJ86 at 8:03 AM on March 3, 2005


The land of the free


Land of the free my ass. Glad I live in Canada.
posted by vagus at 8:03 AM on March 3, 2005


Didja ever think that maybe the kid is being held because he is Kentucky's last, best hope against the zombies? When fighting the army of the living dead, the protagonist is always locked up by those who later beg him for salvation.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 8:06 AM on March 3, 2005


I think intellectual problems inherent to this situation begin somewhere much further down the hierarchy than the finer points of proper syntax in English. Don't it ;?

It shorely do.
posted by Fuzzy Monster at 8:07 AM on March 3, 2005


Hey, Steve, here's a suggestion: get some BRRRAAAAIIIINSSS!

Umm...zombies don't have brains...don't they eat them?

I guess the kid's "terroristic plans" have already been carried out. He should have thought of what would happen when everyone else was brainless...
posted by Aoede at 8:07 AM on March 3, 2005


Zombie Fried Chicken
Kentucky Fried Zombies
Kentucky Zombified Chicken

"It's Terroristic-Lickin' Good!"
posted by Fuzzy Monster at 8:11 AM on March 3, 2005


"Terroristic," since you ask, is an adjective formed from the word "terrorist." It's perfectly grammatically correct. It is the widely used phrase "terrorist threats" that is technically ungrammatical.

Initially i was going to disagree with this, but now that i think it over more, i think it's basically correct. However, there's still something that bugs me about it. It's not as if the threat was terroristic. The threat was purportedly to do something terroristic. So it seems more correct to say something like "terrorism threat" instead of either "terroristic threat" or "terrorist threat". Sort of analogous to somebody arrested for a "murder threat" as opposed to a "murderous threat". I dunno, they all sound weird to me now. Maybe it's best to state it more specifically as "threat to commit terrorist acts". Besides, even if terroristic is technically a word, it just sounds bad.

None of this is to say that any of these phrases necessarily applies to the story in question. It all sounds like a knee-jerk application of terrorism to whatever the hell they want.
posted by jnthnjng at 8:12 AM on March 3, 2005


Keep in mind that this hasn't gone to trial. When and if the kid is convicted, then there's reason to get upset.

Certainly, it's disconcerting that the police have hauled this kid in for threatening the school with zombies and not for bad writing, but let's wait and see what happens. If anyone has any sense, he'll get off and win punitive awards in a counter-suit.
posted by schambers at 8:14 AM on March 3, 2005


soyjoy, using "terrorist" as an adjective is perfectly correct. "Terroristic" is also correct, but there's nothing wrong with "terrorist." Check your friendly neighborhood dictionary. (See also pedant.)
posted by goatdog at 8:15 AM on March 3, 2005


Not so fast, vagus. This has happened here as well. I recall a case involving a student from near Ottawa getting in trouble for writing material about him committing some violence in his school. But then he had Margaret Atwood and Michael Ondaatje defending him - I could only find this page on it - read the second item down.
posted by orange swan at 8:22 AM on March 3, 2005


Here is an extensive write-up of the consequences of zero-tolerance policies in Kentucky. From the looks of it this kid would be in even worse trouble if he were black.
posted by TedW at 8:25 AM on March 3, 2005


Stop this kid now. When the seriously deluded adolescent mind is allowed to fester, it can spin a fictional scenario into a real life quagmire crusade.
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 8:26 AM on March 3, 2005


I just learned that grammatically correct and sensical are not the same thing. I wonder for how long I have carried that misconception?

Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.
posted by rafter at 8:27 AM on March 3, 2005


So, other than a couple of dodgy news-sources, has anyone verified this? I can't believe this story is true.
posted by seanyboy at 8:29 AM on March 3, 2005


An American Bar Association report on zero tolerance policies. When I read this I have a lot of respect for lawyers and am reminded that many of them really are trying to look out for all of us and are not mere ambulance-chasers.

From the first paragraph: Public policy towards children has moved towards treating them more like adults and in ways that increasingly mimic the adult criminal justice system. The most recent version of this movement is so-called "zero tolerance" in schools, where theories of punishment that were once directed to adult criminals are now applied to first graders.
posted by TedW at 8:30 AM on March 3, 2005


orange swan: And I have to admit, the lad's use of double negatives leaves me in doubt as to his ability to correctly characterize his written work.

The fact that someone speaks a dialect different from yours (and hasn't yet mastered the standard dialect he's being taught in school) doesn't mean he's an idiot or a liar.

schambers: When and if the kid is convicted, then there's reason to get upset.

So it's okay if the government locks people up for bogus reasons, as long as they eventually get off?
posted by Axaxaxas Mlö at 8:35 AM on March 3, 2005


if Kentucky cannot prosecute fictitious characters for crimes that never happened, well... that's not an America I'd care to visit.

While we're at it, I have a mass murder to report. Some terrorist blew up a damn, and the resulting flood killed everyone downstream, destroying entire cities. I didn't see the guy who did it, but I did see him drive away. It was an older sedan, one of the big ones (a Buick, maybe?) and I only got part of the plate: YWH.
posted by trondant at 9:06 AM on March 3, 2005


Just a dumb question: Why is he only a junior in high school at 18? Oh, yeah... because he can scarcely speak English!

It's NOT a dialect... it's a bastardization of the English language.
posted by WaterSprite at 9:07 AM on March 3, 2005


Don't you see it. The judge is a Zombie! When will you people listen?
posted by Outlawyr at 9:08 AM on March 3, 2005


"Anytime you make any threat or possess matter involving a school or function it's a felony in the state of Kentucky," said Winchester Police detective Steven Caudill.

They probably burn a lot of books and films in KY.
posted by DBAPaul at 9:14 AM on March 3, 2005


This reminds me of a story on Ayelet Waldman's Bad Mother blog: her husband, Michael Chabon, was inspired by reports of kids being prosecuted for their writing to teach a class of horror writing to teenagers. He got Steven King to show up on the last day of class. Perhaps the two should take their act on the road, maybe swinging by the Bluegrass state.
posted by bibliowench at 9:21 AM on March 3, 2005


goatdog, not sure why you were directing me to the definition of pedant. tpl1212 wrongly claimed "terroristic" was "zombie grammar," and I pointed out the simple fact that it's perfectly correct.

Also, I didn't say "terrorist" can't be used as an adjective. I was speaking to the phrase "terrorist threat," which is usually used in the media as an ersatz noun-modifier construction meaning "the threat of terrorists" or "the threat of (general) terrorism" - so "terroristic threat" is a good, useful and correct way to distinguish specific threats that are, indeed, terroristic.

(Not that this one was, indeed, terroristic. But tell it to the judge.)
posted by soyjoy at 9:22 AM on March 3, 2005


"So it's okay if the government locks people up for bogus reasons, as long as they eventually get off?"

No, Axaxaxas Mlo, no one should ever be wrongfully tossed in prison, but if the system works, that person should be found innocent, and he may then be able to seek damages from the people responsible...
posted by schambers at 9:27 AM on March 3, 2005


randomnfactor: "The 'judge', the calm voice of reason, not a beat cop, pronounces the charge super serious and quadruples the bail. And you guys are going on about grammar?"

I think it's because nobody's surprised, anymore.
posted by CrayDrygu at 9:27 AM on March 3, 2005


Yes... es_de_bah I have lived in a small town...why do you ask?

Still waiting for anyone to come up with a quote from the police that mentions "zombies"......

I did find an article that mentioned that the police stated they had some evidence that he was recruiting other students for some sort of activity (no specific)...

I think it's early to jump all over the police on this one..

Please note... as an official Zombie (starring role, well, minor nearly invisible role in 2004's Dawn of the Dead), I'm considering my comments as the final word on this...
posted by HuronBob at 9:38 AM on March 3, 2005


randomnfactor +1. This pedantry about terrorist/terroristic is beside the point. I don't know why we're seeing links to "colorless green ideas sleep furiously", which would be worthy of a link in a topic to which it is in some distant way related.

Now. Isn't this kid's private writing protected by free speech? And isn't his privacy somehow protected? Last I heard you had to actually DO something to get locked up, not just write about it, unless you're plotting with others.

This is utterly terrifying, right?
posted by sninky-chan at 10:14 AM on March 3, 2005


sninky...

" The arrest came after a tip from a family member that Pool was trying to "recruit a gang to take over the school," Detective Berl Perdue said. Police said writings in which Poole tried to persuade other students to take part in the takeover were found."
posted by HuronBob at 10:20 AM on March 3, 2005


And shouldn't a high school over ran by zombies be "overrun by zombies"?
posted by matildaben at 10:34 AM on March 3, 2005


Look out, matildaben is a zombie!
posted by Outlawyr at 10:43 AM on March 3, 2005


And so we come full circle. OK, that's a wrap!
posted by soyjoy at 10:44 AM on March 3, 2005


I'm guessing it's a story about brain-eating zombies who starve to death.
posted by RockCorpse at 10:46 AM on March 3, 2005


Perhaps he was conspiring with others to start a book club. A books-about-highschool-zombies club that is!
posted by Outlawyr at 10:50 AM on March 3, 2005


Poole, who faces a second-degree felony terrorist threatening charge

It's true that we don't have much information here, but this was the scariest sentence (and the most grammatically incorrect) in the whole article. There is, in fact, no evidence that the kid threateded anyone. Don't you have to, like, you know, let someone know about your intention in order for it to be threatening. Otherwise it just is, right. Ow, my head hurts.

But, seriously. I could understand maybe some kind of conspiracy charge, but unless you release something either verbally or in writing, or make a gesture or something, how can you be threatening someone?
posted by OmieWise at 10:50 AM on March 3, 2005


don't know why we're seeing links to "colorless green ideas sleep furiously"

As indicated by the quoted text, this was a direct reply to das_2099 and nothing more.
posted by rafter at 10:58 AM on March 3, 2005


"Terroristic," since you ask, is an adjective formed from the word "terrorist."

Well phooey. It just sound silly to my simplistic lycathropic ears.
posted by tpl1212 at 11:07 AM on March 3, 2005


Police said writings in which Poole tried to persuade other students to take part in the takeover were found."

So it's a zombie story based on St. Trinians and Taps, eh? Interesting.
posted by fshgrl at 11:11 AM on March 3, 2005


It took two years, the ACLU, $20K in legal fees, and publicity in Wired Magazine to get an Oklahoma teenager out of almost the same mess, except that time, the story was about kids shooting up the school during a disaster instead of zombies.

Had they not finally been able to convince the judge that the story was based on a sample file that comes wtih the PageMaker education edition, the kid might have been convicted. As it was, he was only kicked out of his school, branded as a terrorist, and held under felony charges for so long that they can't expunge his record even though the charges were dropped.
posted by mdeatherage at 11:18 AM on March 3, 2005


I'm not certain, but he was probably just trying to recruit people for his zombie survival plan. I know I've done that. The more the merrier!!
posted by Megafly at 11:19 AM on March 3, 2005


Umm...zombies don't have brains...don't they eat them?
The zombie paradox : if zombies are people who've been ripped apart by zombies, then whence came zombies?
posted by punilux at 11:26 AM on March 3, 2005


mdeatherage: I taught the kid from the Oklahoma teenager story you linked while he attended Moore High School. He was always polite and rather quiet. I was shocked when I heard about the story on the news.

I can't believe how insane people are. Stephen King couldn't get a decent education nowadays.
posted by theFlyingSquirrel at 11:43 AM on March 3, 2005


Something smells fishy. This apparently came from his journal. English paper my ass. Either way, I disagree with charging the kid with anything.
posted by Mach3avelli at 11:46 AM on March 3, 2005


HuronBob "corrected" sninky-chan: "The arrest came after a tip from a family member that Pool was trying to "recruit a gang to take over the school," Detective Berl Perdue said. Police said writings in which Poole tried to persuade other students to take part in the takeover were found."

Some grandparents -- even small-town Kentucky grandparents, who are statistically very likely to be Republican Born-Agains etc. -- might possibly misread and overreact, no? I'm pretty sure I'd have had trouble convincing my grandparents that it was fiction, and even if I did they'd still have said that I had no business even writing fiction like that. "Whatever could possess you to think of such a thing? Has the Devil gotten into you?" (And asking my grandparents "Why are you violating my privacy and then going to the cops before you talk to me?" would only have gotten "We do what we think is best"; I was a teenager a couple decades before "WWJD?" wristbands came out or they'd have mentioned The LORD explicitly.)

As for the police involvement, maybe the cops were BORED. Once you've ticketed and strip-searched some speeders on I-64 and dealt with (locked up? taken bribes from?) the local pot farmers and meth makers, what else is there to do?

And Macky, I think it makes no difference whether it involved an English paper, a private journal, or even (oh the Satanic horror-of-horrors!) a D&D-style role-playing game.
posted by davy at 11:56 AM on March 3, 2005


bring charges against a kid for a bad english paper.

Ah, we can but dream. [/has hard to mark more than my fair share of these]
posted by jokeefe at 12:06 PM on March 3, 2005


[brings charges against jokeefe for improper usage of the word "hard"]
posted by theFlyingSquirrel at 12:09 PM on March 3, 2005


No, jokeefe is merely expressing the idea that grading such papers gives her a metaphorical erection, a "hard." She means that she is eager and willing to grade more than her fair share, which is something her colleagues should be aware of. And perhaps that she finds grading to be titillating, which makes her a pervert of the worst kind.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 12:23 PM on March 3, 2005


...stepped into the Blue. Something strange was in the air. It smelt of rot and decay. It could mean only one thing: Zombies have invaded MetaFilter.

"I ain't gonna let no zombies take MeFi!" I shouted as I reached for my trusty shotgun. From down the hall, I heard a moaning. They were already in the Grey. I was too late.

"Noooo!" I cried, wiping tears from my eyes with my gloved hand. I decided to just let the Grey fall and make my last stand protecting the Green. Lowering my gun, I waited, hearing the shambling scrapping of zombie toes on keyboards come closer..
posted by robocop is bleeding at 9:50 AM CST on March 3 [!]


*checks robocop's home state*
Yer mighty lucky, buddy. In most southern states and all western states it's against the law to threaten MetaFilter.

It's against the law in all states to claim that MetaFilter is dying.
posted by graventy at 12:33 PM on March 3, 2005


"The arrest came after a tip from a family member that Pool was trying to "recruit a gang to take over the school," Detective Berl Perdue said. Police said writings in which Poole tried to persuade other students to take part in the takeover were found."

What were they trying to do, unionize?
posted by Navek Rednam at 1:01 PM on March 3, 2005


When I was in high school, I was in debate class, and debate competitions include things besides specific debates, such as monologues. I took first place in one reading from Richard Bachman's (Stephen King's pen name) "Rage", about a boy who takes a gun to school, kills a teacher if I remember correctly, and takes the entire class hostage.

At the time I wasn't really angry at my school or anything, it was just such a moving piece though and carried so much emotion, told from the boy's perspective and including some of his ruminations while he was doing it.

There were no raised eyebrows as far as I know, or any comment other than congratulations when I won. I really do believe that if a high school student tried that now, they'd end up in prison. How sad is that.
posted by wolftrouble at 1:04 PM on March 3, 2005


I just love that we got 77 comments out of one (or two) very poorly written, poorly documented news reports.... we've written more about this than the media!

God we're good!!

Real Zombies! (note, self link...I'm the good looking one!)
posted by HuronBob at 1:33 PM on March 3, 2005


I have been commenting, then not commenting on this all day. It got to where my comments were so huge I just made them into a blog post. Go here if you are so inclined...
posted by chinese_fashion at 1:36 PM on March 3, 2005


crap... real zombies again..

but it is odd that broken link resolves to microsoft...hmmm
posted by HuronBob at 1:40 PM on March 3, 2005


So let me get this right, a KID wrote about zombies. He knows it's fiction, he didn't write about anyone he knew, and he didn't threaten anyone. At least that's what we are to understand from the reports on the case so far.

Hell, did anyone ever play "assassins" in high school? Didn't we TRY to find different ways to "kill" the enemy. And there was an enemy list, your side shared ways on how to "kill". Granted this was before Columbine, but from what I've heard from younger generations, that forms of this GAME are still being played. I just question how much we are reading between the lines and not seeing this for what it is. A story, a kid, possibly the next horror writer, not some terrorist.
posted by monkeyhead at 2:41 PM on March 3, 2005


.. we've written more about this than the media!


God we're good!!
bored.

posted by login at 2:42 PM on March 3, 2005


~soft drum roll~
And the coveted Secret Life of Gravy Award for Best Humor in a Zombie Thread goes to...
.
.
RockCorpse!!!!

Very nice, very dead-pan!
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 3:32 PM on March 3, 2005


The local paper talks all about "trying to organize a gang to take over the school" and not at all about zombies.

Hard to know what to make of this one: either the kid is telling a truly lame lie that couldn't possibly stand up, or the cops and DA are pursuing a truly lame case that shouldn't possibly be able to stand up.
posted by Zed_Lopez at 4:57 PM on March 3, 2005


Stop this kid now. When the seriously deluded adolescent mind is allowed to fester, it can spin a fictional scenario into a real life quagmire crusade.
Looking on the bright side, it's apparently no hindrance to becoming president ... :)
posted by kaemaril at 6:24 PM on March 3, 2005


Of course, what I always found interesting about zombie films is the juxtaposition of real and unreal, the familiar and the deadly...

This, of course, we can only do from what we know, thus the high school (or mall, or somesuch).

Meh.
posted by Samizdata at 3:46 AM on March 4, 2005


It's NOT a dialect... it's a bastardization of the English language.

Hesitant as I am to respond to what seems like a troll: yes, it is a dialect. Regardless of this guy specifically, use of double negatives, or any other consistent linguistic device, doesn't equate to idiocy. All French jokes aside...
posted by Drexen at 6:30 AM on March 4, 2005


I like how this thread about an American high school kid being jailed and charged with terrorism for writing a work of fiction becomes Grammar Nazis Gone Wild.

Really got your thumb on the pulse, guys.
posted by ticopelp at 11:38 AM on March 4, 2005


are we fully into the formative phase of "ThoughtCrime" becoming something real? this is absurd beyond absurd.

i guess fiction will be the first casualty.
posted by radiosilents at 5:41 PM on March 4, 2005


It looks like it really wasn't zombies at all...

"And, as it turns out, Poole's writings include no brain-eating dead folks.

What they do contain, Winchester police Detective Steven Caudill testified yesterday, is evidence that he had tried to solicit seven fellow students to join him in a military organization called No Limited Soldiers." - Lexington Herald-Leader
posted by ?! at 10:44 AM on March 13, 2005


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