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Air Jesus
March 11, 2005 5:05 AM   Subscribe

With The Evangelical Air Force. "The NRB's influence was best summarized by its new CEO, Frank Wright, who, in describing a recent lobbying excursion to Capitol Hill, said, "We got into rooms we've never been in before. We got down on the floor of the Senate and prayed over Hillary Clinton's desk." I think this is quite funny, not tragic. There's an interview with the author over here [MP3].
posted by gsb (25 comments total)

 
Christian persecution in America my ass. Perhaps if secular society took to the old ways of throwing a few of them to the lions occasionally they'd be justified to keep harping about that, but it seems to me that in considering themselves "persecuted" America's Christians are spitting on the graves of their own martyrs who had to put up with actual persecution.
posted by clevershark at 5:45 AM on March 11, 2005


i think it's tragic
posted by Substrata at 5:52 AM on March 11, 2005


I'm forming a new group. The NAACP. No, no. Not that NAACP. This one is the - National Association for Advancement of Christian Persecution-
Sheeesh. When are they going to realize they are being manipulated for the political and monetary gain of others?
All because of a narcisstic belief in a future life.
posted by notreally at 6:22 AM on March 11, 2005


"Did you see the bus?"

That interview is quite good.
posted by 327.ca at 6:38 AM on March 11, 2005


I think that the comparison to Hamas or Hezbollah is quite apt. However, I certainly hope that they don't push that "2Die4" slogan quite so literally. I'm not sure that the economic conditions of this country have deteriorated quite far enough to make those kind of dire predictions.
However, if the dollar really tanks and we get even a hint of hyper-inflation, then all bets are off. Duck and cover.
posted by mooncrow at 6:57 AM on March 11, 2005


Persecution? Oh please, they don't know from persecution.

Good read.
posted by SisterHavana at 7:21 AM on March 11, 2005


I agree mooncrow. I think we will eventually see a more high profile, organized militant group on the right. Perhaps a rightwing counterpoint to The Weathermen / Weather Underground.
posted by R. Mutt at 7:37 AM on March 11, 2005


The Republicans are the money changers, and after Jesus died for our sins there is no one left to run them out of the Temple.
posted by The Jesse Helms at 7:47 AM on March 11, 2005


Again -- and I've mentioned this before -- the fervor of these people seems to arise from a genuine desire to be able to say that they've been victimized, and that ultimately someone or something else can be blamed for the unhappiness in their lives (hence the talk of revolution and opposition).

That Ryan Dobson guy is fucking scary.
posted by clevershark at 7:55 AM on March 11, 2005


Probably the wealthiest culturally coherent group in the world and they're whining about being persecuted? Please.

If there is a heaven none of those people are getting in.
posted by fshgrl at 7:58 AM on March 11, 2005


If there is a heaven none of those people are getting in.

As the saying goes -- and I think it's from the Bible -- "as they sow, so shall they reap". The merchants of hate will be well-rewarded, if not in this world, then in some other one.
posted by clevershark at 8:04 AM on March 11, 2005


scary indeed. and the bus exhibit is pretty fucking tasteless, even for Republican standards

from the article:
"Calls for tolerance are often a subterfuge when everything will be tolerated except Christian truth."

yes but as John's Pilate said, what is truth?
Piecing together precisely what Jesus did that week is, of course, impossible. First Century historians wrote only a few lines about Jesus. The Gospels of Mark, Luke, Matthew and John, which are read and regarded as sacred by millions, tell us more, but when scholars try to use the books historically, problems emerge. The writers sometimes disagree, and the earliest gospel was written at least 30 years after Jesus' death by believers trying to spread the news about their new religion, Christianity.

Crossan: It's not that anyone is telling a lie. They are writing gospel. If you read a gospel as giving you straight history you are denying what it claims to be, namely good news. And if we were to confront them and say, well, that's not history, they say, ‘I never said I was writing history. That's your problem. I'm writing gospel.
posted by matteo at 8:07 AM on March 11, 2005


These are a bunch of sick fucks.

Let's hope there really is a hell and that there's an especially horrid spot reserved for these haters.

How far can you twist the words of Jesus as found in the Bible to suit your own agenda of power and hate?
posted by nofundy at 8:09 AM on March 11, 2005


Hey guys, I have an idea- let's blame all of our problems on somebody else! Think about the possibilities: if we always have a convenient scapegoat (or scapegoats) at the ready, we'll never have to take responsibility for our actions! Sure, this may cause more problems, but we all know who caused those problems, right? (nudge, nudge, wink wink) So blame the Muslims! Blame the poor! Blame the Jews (oh wait, we like them when they agree with us.. ummm....) If we have enough power and dedicate enough resources to the task, nothing will ever be our fault again! Help, help, we're being repressed!
posted by afroblanca at 8:10 AM on March 11, 2005


>How far can you twist the words of Jesus as found in the Bible to suit your own agenda of power and hate?

Before that, you said:

>Let's hope there really is a hell and that there's an especially horrid spot reserved for these haters.

Do you see a teensy tiny problem? Do you see it?
posted by gsb at 8:14 AM on March 11, 2005


Persecution, that's actually a good idea.

Perhaps someone should organize groups of leatherfags to prowl the streets on Harleys to kick the living shit out of people around known Christian congregating areas.

Maybe they can tie a youth pastor to one of their bikes and drag him down the road a while.

Then I could accept their martyr complex as legitimate. Well, maybe not. They'd have to be socially marginalised as well. Being the subject of sectarian hatred helps.

Speaking of martyrs, I wonder if in this case some fundamentalist sects would start encouraging 'martyrdom' of the middle eastern variety.
posted by [expletive deleted] at 8:24 AM on March 11, 2005


Also, I feel a quote from the Daily Show is appropriate here:
"Yeah, real courageous Mel, releasing a pro-Jesus film in America. Somewhere, Salman Rusdie is playing the worlds smallest sitar for you."

Also, did anyone catch the bit on the Anglican schism over gays? "The Anglican church, all about the protection of Marriage. Well, except for one day. That day when it was founded so Henry VIII could get a divorce...but since then, all about protecting Marriage."
posted by [expletive deleted] at 8:28 AM on March 11, 2005


Although it is nice to see that the North American Anglican churches on the right side of this debate. If only there were more compassionate voices in religion today, perhaps I wouldn't judge it so harshly.

Ok, triple post. I'm done for now. Off to work.
posted by [expletive deleted] at 8:31 AM on March 11, 2005


Although it is nice to see that the North American Anglican churches on the right side of this debate. If only there were more compassionate voices in religion today, perhaps I wouldn't judge it so harshly.

Not sniping at you personally, [explitive deleted], but I've lost whatever patience I might ever have felt for church positions on gay rights.

They dither endlessly about the need to achieve consensus instead of simply doing the right thing. It's all about risk assessment and covering their collective asses. Is the sanctity of the church more important than the rights of human beings? Apparently so.
posted by 327.ca at 8:37 AM on March 11, 2005


>How far can you twist the words of Jesus as found in the Bible to suit your own agenda of power and hate?

Before that, you said:

>Let's hope there really is a hell and that there's an especially horrid spot reserved for these haters.

Do you see a teensy tiny problem? Do you see it?
posted by gsb at 11:14 AM EST


I understand what you are intimating.

No, I don't hate them, but I am repulsed and angered by their actions.

Yes, I do believe it would be justice done if their God punished them for twisting His words. After all, it's their belief system and their Hell and if they truly believed the teachings of Jesus, then they condemn themselves, not I.

You must also see that I am not twisting anyone's words to achieve or maintain power, most especially not claiming to be an emissary of a deity. Big differences between these folks and myself.

Do you see a problem with my calling them out for their agenda of hatred and demonization? Should I remain silent in the face such egregious actions by so-called "men of God?"

I admit to poor phrasing and expression. Sorry for that. Is this a little better?
posted by nofundy at 11:27 AM on March 11, 2005


I think one of the many problems between the irreligious and the monotheists is an animosity between the groups -- especially when the fervor is involved in politics.

When you condemn them to Hell all it really does is feed into their own sense of judgment and apocalyptic paranoia. Surely there's a better way, a more sane and substantial way.

>Should I remain silent in the face such egregious actions by so-called "men of God?"

Perhaps silence is a virtue. I'm not a virtuous person, I'm guilty of all sorts of pathetic actions. However, I've learnt that being as angry as the person I disagree with can be counter-productive.

>Sorry for that. Is this a little better?

I don't deserve an apology. It does not put me up or down.
posted by gsb at 2:31 PM on March 11, 2005


nofundy writes " I admit to poor phrasing and expression."

You've been a lot nicer lately [or so it seems to me] with your opposition to and/or concerns regarding religion. I appreciate it. Makes me more willing to listen to ya. ;)
posted by sciurus at 2:35 PM on March 11, 2005


327, normally, I would be the first to agree with you, but I think that the Anglican diocese in my city deserves some degree of credit for deciding to bless same sex marriages more or less immediately after they became legal. This decision cost them. They lost alot of their older, conservative congregation, mostly to Catholicism, but they understood the only alternative is to be morally bankrupt for the sake of popularity.
posted by [expletive deleted] at 6:15 PM on March 11, 2005


problems between the irreligious and the monotheists is an animosity between the groups

Um.... are you serious? The "irreligious" just want to be left the fuck alone, thank you very much.
posted by melt away at 7:39 AM on March 12, 2005


>I think one of the many problems...

And no, I'm not serious.
posted by gsb at 7:48 AM on March 12, 2005


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