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No smoke, mirrors.
June 2, 2005 8:56 AM   Subscribe

Sunlight is escaping many of our neighborhoods! The future home of Teardrop Park South, which will sit in building shadows almost year-round and seemed destined to be the darkest of ... no, wait ... Heliostats!
posted by R. Mutt (13 comments total)

 
Could they use these to get some light into the White House?
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 9:07 AM on June 2, 2005


"Really, they’re nothing more than big Boy Scout signal mirrors, the kind you sort of line up and shine into Bobby’s eyes."
'daylight consultant' - David Norris


"Argh! It burns!
Mom! Davey burned me!"
-Bobby
posted by NinjaPirate at 9:28 AM on June 2, 2005


Where did I recently read that mirror(s) were used on a mountain to extend daylight for a whole town?
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 9:34 AM on June 2, 2005


WGP: That sounded familiar (and awesome). I found this.
posted by schustafa at 9:49 AM on June 2, 2005


Right, schustafa, that's it. Still in the planning stages, I guess.
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 10:06 AM on June 2, 2005


I actually posted on that...
posted by Specklet at 10:55 AM on June 2, 2005


This is great until a hailstorm cracks the lenses, rendering them practically useless. Howzabout we put more people underground and let what grows naturally on the surface of the earth grow there, or at least seed and sod the tops of buildings, like they do in Detroit, though for completely different reasons.
posted by eclectist at 2:08 PM on June 2, 2005


Brings back fond memories of the Kindergarten Solar-powered Death Squad.
posted by gummo at 2:32 PM on June 2, 2005


"This is great until a hailstorm cracks the lenses, rendering them practically useless."

I'm always amazed by comments like this. These are $120,000 devices, designed and built by a company dedicated to solar products. The were purchased by the lead designer of the park, the owner of a landscape design and architecture firm that has designed countless parks and public buildings for cities nationwide.

Do you honestly believe that nobody thought about how these big mirrors, which were being installed outdoors, would hold up to weather?

Honestly.
posted by CrayDrygu at 2:55 PM on June 2, 2005


Do you honestly believe that nobody thought about how these big mirrors, which were being installed outdoors, would hold up to weather?
Stranger things have happened. Honestly.
posted by dg at 6:57 PM on June 2, 2005


brilliant (heh) post. thanks.
posted by dhruva at 10:39 PM on June 2, 2005


"Stranger things have happened. Honestly."

These things have been installed in outdoor locations all over the world, for many years, in real-life weather situations. They've had enough time to be perfected by now.

And while the human species continually amazed me with its capacity to screw up even the most obvious details (myself included, mind you)... this one just isn't on the list. It would be like, if you'll excuse the cliche, putting screen doors on a submarine.
posted by CrayDrygu at 12:06 AM on June 3, 2005


CrayDrugu, "around the world" != America. The US enjoys some of the most extreme weather in the world. I say "enjoys", because I miss it. I haven't seen a good thunderstorm since I left 7 years ago. So, while I see very much the validity of where you're coming from, there is certainly plenty room to wonder.

Meanwhile, I wonder if this technology would be affordable to an individual home owner? Reflect some extra solar heat to my pool and house! This is a lovely house I'm in, but it gets the sun the wrong time of year.

I really look forward to seeing how this is going to look. I've wondered for years why it wasn't being done.
posted by Goofyy at 2:45 AM on June 3, 2005


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