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Abramoff enters guilty plea.
January 3, 2006 7:33 AM   Subscribe

Jack Abramoff to plead guilty in corruption case. Josh Marshall's Talking Points Memo is the place to go for up-to-the-minute analysis, because he's been following the case closely for years now. The Washington Post has a handy chart, giving an overview of who is in the crosshairs.
posted by empath (87 comments total)

 
We've turned a corner!

The administration is in its last throes!

/ etc.
posted by you just lost the game at 7:37 AM on January 3, 2006


The administration will welcome us as liberators, with flowers?

The impeachment will pay for itself?
posted by odinsdream at 7:47 AM on January 3, 2006


Crimany!!
posted by jpburns at 7:58 AM on January 3, 2006


Not a double. The plea is official today. Press conference in a few hours.
posted by empath at 7:59 AM on January 3, 2006


The previous post mentioned he was working for a deal. The fact that a deal happened is additional information, not "the best of the web."

This should have been added to the still open thread.
posted by jpburns at 8:02 AM on January 3, 2006


Here's hoping they throw the book at the colluders who threw in with this asshole, it's because of people like this that representative democracy in this country has become nothing more than a sick joke.
I don't care if it's dems or repubs, let the chips fall where they may and here's hoping the guilty parties get maximum sentences in a federal pound-me-in-the-ass prison and not in a 'luxury lockup'. I really do hope they all rot in hell.
posted by mk1gti at 8:07 AM on January 3, 2006


Huh huh. anal rape is funnay.
posted by delmoi at 8:10 AM on January 3, 2006


Reg-free link for those who don't want to bother.

Link generator for reg-free links.
posted by Malor at 8:20 AM on January 3, 2006


Impeachment's not good enough. They should face extraordinary rendition, surely.
posted by katiecat at 8:28 AM on January 3, 2006


*That's* a great idea. Off to Abu-Ghuraib with them. Let them experience first hand what they signed off on. Worked for Mussolini. . .
posted by mk1gti at 8:42 AM on January 3, 2006


Not that this has anything to do with anything, but I didn't realize that Abramoff worked for Preston, Gates and Ellis, a firm whose "Gates" (in its masthead) is non other than Bill Gates's father. I am not sure if the senior Gates is still alive, I know he retired some years ago, but Bill Neukom, former MSFT General Counsel, is the firm's Chairman. I'd have to be sporting a pretty hefty tinfoil hat to draw a connection between the Abramoff scandal and anything to do with the Redmond-based software giant, but it's fun to speculate.
posted by Tommy Gnosis at 8:50 AM on January 3, 2006


Plead guilty, sure. But is he going to roll over and starting naming names?
posted by Kickstart70 at 8:55 AM on January 3, 2006


Plus, Abramhoff seems more like a pounder then a poundee. It's like all the people who wanted to send Kobe Bryant to "pound me in the ass prison". Um, hello...
posted by delmoi at 8:57 AM on January 3, 2006


Kickstart, that's the point. This is a plea deal. And the NYT says that he's been cooperating for a while. This is going to involve a good number of Congressmen. As the NYT says, "Now that Mr. Abramoff has [pled], one person involved in the case said: "When some people hear about this, they will clamor to cut a deal of their own." "

If Abramoff continues to cooperate, he's looking at maybe 10 years. If not, who knows.

See here for more commentary.
posted by ibmcginty at 9:01 AM on January 3, 2006


If he received a Presidential pardon, I'd be not one bit surprised.
posted by alumshubby at 9:02 AM on January 3, 2006


The charges have been posted.
posted by empath at 9:14 AM on January 3, 2006


In the charges, there are references to "Firm A" and "Firm B". Why? In the Libby case, "Official A" was thought to be a yet-unindicted co-conspirator. Is that why these charges don't name these firms, whose names are already public knowledge?
posted by ibmcginty at 9:18 AM on January 3, 2006


Page 9 is where the good stuff starts (if you're a Democrat).

They are going to nail Tom DeLay with bribery charges.
posted by empath at 9:19 AM on January 3, 2006


Looks like Rep #1 is actually Bob Ney and not Tom DeLay, according to Josh Marshall.
posted by empath at 9:30 AM on January 3, 2006


Page 9 is where the good stuff starts (if you're a Democrat patriot).
posted by Faint of Butt at 10:40 AM on January 3, 2006


Pass the popcorn!

Last week the word was at least a dozen GOoPers going down.
This week the word is at least 20 of them he will testify against.
Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus!

The official talking point from the wingnut contingent: Dems too!! Dems too!!

But then, that would be focusing on legal campaign contributions and not the very large GOP slush fund that Abramoff operated.
And, hey "liberal media", there's SEX stories involved too!! Yup, not only did Abramoff have a restaurant where the GOP ate for free (Signatures) but he also had a [ahem] "hospitality house."

I hear K Street lobbyists are having a conniption fit. Delay is gone and Dean won't play ball so they have no one left to bribe!
posted by nofundy at 10:43 AM on January 3, 2006


The real question is:

Will the stars and stripes fly above the elephant and corporate flags once again?
posted by nofundy at 10:44 AM on January 3, 2006


Note that this is only the Florida charges. We haven't seen the D.C. charges, which are supposed to be announced separately. Note that Raw Story is saying that Abramoff buddy Scanlon's ex-fiancee turned them all in when he dumped her for a manicurist. She was the one who tried to terminate the interview with Colin Powell on NBC by turning the camera away.
posted by Ironmouth at 10:45 AM on January 3, 2006


That's a pretty clear list of charges, but to a cynical public, won't it look as though Abramoff and DeLay were, in essence, guilty of being caught red-handed (apologies to Milo Aukerman), while just engaging in business as usual?

Without sleazy innuendo, a mention of a metaphorical blue dress or some indication that someone very high tried to cover this up, will this capture the imagination and indignation of the press, any by extension, the public?
posted by Tommy Gnosis at 10:47 AM on January 3, 2006


How about contract murder?
posted by empath at 10:49 AM on January 3, 2006


The Florida charges do involve contract murder for sure. Just don't know if Abramoff will be charged in that but he definitely was a part of the operation.
posted by nofundy at 10:53 AM on January 3, 2006


This is awesome. I don't think it's hyperbolic to say it's the biggest Congressional scandal in decades.
posted by bardic at 11:00 AM on January 3, 2006


White House involvement to protect Abramoff? (via Josh Marshall)

LA Times:
(emphasis mine)
A U.S. grand jury in Guam opened an investigation of controversial lobbyist Jack Abramoff more than two years ago, but President Bush removed the supervising federal prosecutor and the inquiry ended soon after. [...]

The transactions were the target of a grand jury subpoena issued Nov. 18, 2002, according to a copy obtained by The Times. The subpoena demanded that Anthony Sanchez, administrative director of the Guam Superior Court, release records involving the lobbying contract, including bills and payments.

A day later, the chief prosecutor, U.S. Atty. Frederick A. Black, who had launched the investigation, was demoted. A White House news release announced that Bush was replacing Black. [...]

Abramoff, who then represented the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, alerted his clients in a memo about the expected report and warned: "It will require some major action from the Hill and a press attack to get this back in the bottle."
Additional info and reposts of major articles on the matter here.

PDF of request for investigation by House Judiciary ranking member Conyers here. (as of 12-4-2005, there has been no response to Conyers request.)
posted by edverb at 11:03 AM on January 3, 2006


Abramoff, he looks so. . . remorseful in the photograph. . . I just want to offer him a hanky . . .
posted by mk1gti at 11:05 AM on January 3, 2006


But Miller had something on Scanlon. He confided in her all of his dealings with Abramoff, former colleagues said. She saw his emails and knew the intimate details of his lobbying work—work which is now the center of a criminal fraud investigation. After the breakup, Miller went to the FBI and told them everything about Scanlon’s dealings with Abramoff, her coworkers added.

In turning him in, she became the agency’s star witness against her former lover. Scanlon pled guilty in November and is cooperating with prosecutors; Abramoff reached a plea agreement today.

Scanlon's former colleagues did not speak warmly of him, saying he was not a very likable person because of the way he treated others, and that he later became flamboyant with his newfound wealth.
---------------------------------------------------------

And these people wonder why 'liberals' loathe and detest them so much. . . Why, it's because they're soulless, evil despicable individuals with no moral character or decency who have no respect for democracy and every intention through words and actions of subverting freedom and democracy in the country of their birth, that's why. In other words, they're damnable traitors who should be tried and treated as such.
posted by mk1gti at 11:25 AM on January 3, 2006


Think Progress has a complete rundown of the dramatis personae.

The GOP isn't a political party, it's a crime family.
posted by empath at 11:33 AM on January 3, 2006


Amen, mk1gti. They turn on each other so quickly, too. How lovely would that be to have an ex drop a dime on you to the FBI to avenge a broken heart (if she has one to break). Honor among thieves?

What do you think? Will it be the 8th or 9th circle for them?
posted by psmealey at 11:38 AM on January 3, 2006


mk1gti said: And these people wonder why 'liberals' loathe and detest them so much. . . Why, it's because they're soulless, evil despicable individuals with no moral character or decency who have no respect for democracy and every intention through words and actions of subverting freedom and democracy in the country of their birth, that's why. In other words, they're damnable traitors who should be tried and treated as such.

Whoa there pardner. That's a little to heavy on the rhetoric there buddy boy. Abramoff is no more guilty of treason or being a traitor that any one else in this country. What he is guilty of is bribery, conspiracy, and fraud. His little racket was a money laundering scheme, a way for big business to funnel money to politicians for votes, or as some would like to put it, for influence. This is the age old problem of politics. Those is power will always be courted by those with money, because those with money wish to increase their holdings, and those in power are in an excellent position to help them further that goal. It is not treasonous or traitorous. It is capitolism at it's finest. It is also not unique to America. It can be matched through the ages in countless countries. It is the pursiut of weath and power that brings these things into creation. It is also the limiting of said wealth and power that should be the single most goal of any god-fearing Marxist Christian. Or you can just be an anarchist and throw the whole thing out, baby, bathwater, and all. We'll reach that lofty goal of corporate feudalism soon enough. For now just content yourself that the American court system has it's new prize case to tout come the next election cycle. The attorney generals of Florida and Washington, D.C. are up for re-election soon...
posted by daq at 11:42 AM on January 3, 2006


It is capitolism (sic) at it's finest.

Or at it's worst?
posted by nofundy at 11:51 AM on January 3, 2006


a way for big business to funnel money to politicians for votes

Sounds pretty treasonous to a democracy to me.
posted by caddis at 12:02 PM on January 3, 2006


daq
He subverted the democratic process through influence peddling and lobbying expressly designed to subvert the will and welfare of the american people. That is treason. Which do you hold more dear? Your country or big business? I don't have to think about that question. You clearly do. capitalism at it's finest? Try capitalism at it's worst.
These people are more like Stalinists or Maoists than they are capitalists. Look up both characters for an in-depth character study of both and how they really do resemble the current crop of right-wing politicians.
posted by mk1gti at 12:03 PM on January 3, 2006


mk1gti

I had a great meandering reply to you, but I'm just going to save that for editing and posting on my own blog.

Yes, the comparison has been made to dictators masquerading as men of the people, etc, etc.

Feel free to continue making noise.

I'm going to go plot how to make a damn monkey army.
posted by daq at 12:38 PM on January 3, 2006


There can be no crime more serious than bribery. Other offenses violate one law while corruption strikes at the foundation of all law. Under our form of government all authority is vested in the people and by them delegated to those who represent them in official capacity. There can be no offense heavier than that of him in whom such a sacred trust has been reposed, who sells it for his own gain and enrichment...he is worse than the thief, for the thief robs the individual, while the corrupt official plunders an entire city or state. He is as wicked as the murderer, for the murderer may only take one life against the law, while the corrupt official and the man who corrupts the official alike aim at the assassination of the Commonwealth itself.
-Theodore Roosevelt
posted by edverb at 12:38 PM on January 3, 2006


I had a great meandering reply to you, but I'm just going to save that for editing and posting on my own blog.
-------------------------------------
After seeing what you've had to contribute, I don't think it could be anything *but* a meandering reply. Have fun shouting into the wind on your blog. . . Good luck with the monkey army. Perhaps you can take Paris Paramus with you to train them. . .
posted by mk1gti at 12:46 PM on January 3, 2006


After seeing what this administration has had to contribute to the 'democratic process' they make a very good argument for stripping away powers of executive privilege from the presidency. No powers to pardon, no powers to hide behind the office ever again.
posted by mk1gti at 12:48 PM on January 3, 2006


Have fun shouting into the wind on your blog.

You have no idea how funny this is.

Really, you have no idea.
posted by daq at 12:48 PM on January 3, 2006


You have no idea how funny this is.

Really, you have no idea.


Were you cackling maniacally and twirling your wee moustache as you typed that, daq?
posted by ibmcginty at 12:55 PM on January 3, 2006


No, I'm trying to decide if it's ironic that he's calling me out for shouting into the wind on my blog while he's shouting into the wind on a blog. Though that may be just too obvious.

Noise. It amuses me sometimes.
posted by daq at 12:58 PM on January 3, 2006


These people are more like Stalinists or Maoists than they are capitalists.

Mussolini would disagree. :-)

Fascism should more properly be called corporatism, since it is the merger of state and corporate power.

Or was it not Mussolini but Giovanni Gentile?
posted by nofundy at 1:05 PM on January 3, 2006


Actually, if you reviewed the history of Stalin and Mao, they would seem to be more fascist than communist.
posted by mk1gti at 1:27 PM on January 3, 2006


This will go a long ways towards rehabilitating the reputation of the Grant administration.
posted by warbaby at 1:46 PM on January 3, 2006


i'll throw my two cents in here and agree with what mk1gti is saying about mao , and stalin.

i think much of the paranoid ideas of those good ol' boys is becoming way to familiar in our day to day lives here in the US.
posted by nola at 1:47 PM on January 3, 2006


All I want is the land of the free, home of the brave and freedom and justice for all. Is that really too much to ask?
I mean really, what kind of screwhead does somebody have to be to not get that simple line of reasoning? Why do they hate america so much?
posted by mk1gti at 1:54 PM on January 3, 2006


And by the way, Stalin and Mao cursed, feared and otherwise were very negative towards those they interpreted as 'liberals'. Just as the right-wing in this country is. Why do commies and right wingers agree so much on too many of the wrong things and not enough of the right things? What's up with that? Are they really that different? Maoists wear Mao suits, capitalists wear business suits. What's the difference?
posted by mk1gti at 2:09 PM on January 3, 2006


Actually, if you reviewed the history of Stalin and Mao, they would seem to be more fascist than communist.

Well, let's just call them all Totalitarians and leave it at that.
posted by empath at 2:11 PM on January 3, 2006


And now they're going after the families
-------------------------------------------------
The 'information' is quite open-ended. (Note that page three refers to bribes to "public officials and their relatives" which seems to allude to possible indictments involving if not necessarily against spouses of members of Congress.)
posted by mk1gti at 2:14 PM on January 3, 2006


bad kittie, no catnip . . .
posted by mk1gti at 2:15 PM on January 3, 2006


Man, this has gotta be bad news for the GOP if Metafilter's usual apologists aren't here to defend Abramoff/DeLay/et al.
posted by Rothko at 2:16 PM on January 3, 2006


A nice little summation of Abramoffukkah, courtesy of Wonkette
posted by mk1gti at 2:25 PM on January 3, 2006


"Jack Abramoff" just sounds dirty.
posted by stbalbach at 2:27 PM on January 3, 2006


Why do commies and right wingers agree so much on too many of the wrong things and not enough of the right things?

This has puzzled me recently. Conservatives I know seem willing to condemn the nicer parts of communism (a supposed equality, government that acts for the people, checks and balances for wealth/power) and praise the worst parts (huge government that refuses to be questioned, secret imprisonment, torture, wars to promote a kind of government, control of the press).

What gives?
posted by dougunderscorenelso at 2:29 PM on January 3, 2006


I know I've said it too many times before, but the original 'The Manchurian Candidate with Frank Sinatra and 'Seven Days in May' were movies ahead of their time when they were released back in the early 1960's. Predictions of things to come from the conservative right wing. Delusional paranoids all.
posted by mk1gti at 2:38 PM on January 3, 2006


And now they're going after the families
"Abramoff arranged for the hiring of several Congressional wives, including Christine DeLay, wife of the Majority Whip. (Christine DeLay took four years to research the favorite charity of each member of Congress, for which she was paid $115,000....) Abramoff frequently used his D.C. charity, Capital Athletic Foundation, as a pass-through organization to run lobbying efforts and to pay for expenses, including retaining the services of a firm owned by Republican California Rep. John Doolittle's wife Julie, Sierra Dominion Financial Solutions Inc. Abramoff is also accused of misusing his charity to fund activities like an Israeli sniper school on the West Bank.

Abramoff also allegedly misused a conservative D.C. think tank on whose board he served, the National Center for Public Policy Research. The group was allegedly used to launder $50,000 to pay for a May 2000 trip by DeLay, his wife, Rudy, and another DeLay aide to Scotland....

And in May 2000, DeLay, his wife, aide Tony Rudy, and another DeLay aide took a trip to Scotland sponsored by the conservative D.C. think tank the National Center for Public Policy Research, one day after two Abramoff clients each donated $25,000 to the group....

At about the same time, a Virginia consulting firm registered to Rudy's wife Lisa received money apparently laundered from a $25,000 donation received by a charity of Abramoff and DeLay friend Rabbi Daniel Lapin, Toward Tradition....

[Rep. John] Doolittle's wife, Julie, owned a consulting firm, Sierra Dominion Financial Solutions Inc., that was hired by Abramoff and his firm to do fundraising for a charity he founded, Capital Athletic Foundation, at about the time Doolittle undertook legislative actions favorable to Abramoff's clients....

In 2000, [Rabbi Daniel] Lapin's religious charity received a $25,000 donation from an online gambling company, eLottery, a lobbying client of Abramoff and Preston Gates Ellis. That money was then allegedly used to pay a Virginia consulting firm, Liberty Consulting, registered to Lisa Rudy, the wife of DeLay's deputy chief of staff, Tony Rudy. At that time Rudy had been instrumental in scuttling an antigambling bill, the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act, that eLottery and Abramoff wanted killed." [source]
posted by ericb at 2:43 PM on January 3, 2006


Entertaining, but I predict that nothing of any real import will come of this. Any court cases deriving from this against elected officials will take months, if not years to resolve. By the time prosecutors work their way up the chain to the White House, (if they ever do) we will have already elected a new president who will, as a courtesy, (and to preserve the dignity of the office) pardon all important persons involved. Maybe one or two scapegoats will do a few months in a minimum security prison, but then back to business as usual.
posted by MetalDog at 3:06 PM on January 3, 2006


Good movies both, mk1gti, but can't help but think of the Parallax view when it comes to this stuff.

The whole lobbying thing is a dirty business. Part of me wonders if we just trashed the whole Senate and Electoral College system in favor of direct elections for all positions, that we'd be better off, but I'm just being naive.
posted by psmealey at 3:07 PM on January 3, 2006


"Corporations have been enthroned...An era of corruption in high places will follow...until wealth is aggregated in a few hands...and the republic is destroyed." - Abraham Lincoln

"We must crush in its birth the aristocracy of our moneyed corporations, which dare already to bid defiance to the laws of our country." - Thomas Jefferson
posted by ericb at 3:08 PM on January 3, 2006


the original 'The Manchurian Candidate ... and 'Seven Days in May' were movies ahead of their time ... Predictions of things to come from the conservative right wing.

mk1gti, why don't you pass a little time playing solitaire?
posted by NorthernLite at 3:09 PM on January 3, 2006


Conservatives I know seem willing to condemn the nicer parts of communism (a supposed equality, government that acts for the people, checks and balances for wealth/power) and praise the worst parts (huge government that refuses to be questioned, secret imprisonment, torture, wars to promote a kind of government, control of the press).

Maybe it says something about what "conservatism" is really all about.

I'm not talking about all conservatives, actually. Just a good chunk of what appears to be Flagship Philosophy in the popular dialogue at the moment. To the extent that a reasonable right exists, I hope that they're realizing how badly the Flagship needs to be replaced.
posted by namespan at 3:10 PM on January 3, 2006


LobbyingInfo.org
posted by ericb at 3:12 PM on January 3, 2006


"When this is all over, this will be bigger than any [government scandal] in the last 50 years, both in the amount of people involved and the breadth of it."

"The problem is that it's like the Titanic, you see the iceberg coming but you don't see how big it is under the water." - Stanley Brand (former U.S. House of Representatives counsel).

"Stanley Brand...predicts at least six members of Congress and at least as many staff will be convicted by the end of the year."
posted by ericb at 3:33 PM on January 3, 2006


Looks like that turd in the toilet-bowl of modern politics, the stinkingly corrupt Tom Delay, is about to go down the crapper. I guess it's too much to hope that he takes that anal-blockage in the body politic, Karl Rove, and that sycophantic mens-room attendant of a President, George ( I'm above the law ) Bush, into the cesspit with him.

Interestingly enough, I see that the usual loudmouthed right-wing trolling blowhards have nothing to say, now. Unsurprisingly, they are noticeably absent here. What's the matter? Don't have reams of material to enlighten us lowly liberals and non-lawyers about how theft really isn't theft, when Republicans do it.

Not that the Democrats are exactly blameless. Frikken thieving bastages, the lot of 'em.
posted by PareidoliaticBoy at 3:49 PM on January 3, 2006


Man, this has gotta be bad news for the GOP if Metafilter's usual apologists aren't here to defend Abramoff/DeLay/et al.

They're waiting for the GOP talking points to come out. And I'm only 1/4 kidding.
posted by jperkins at 4:02 PM on January 3, 2006


mk1gti, why don't you pass a little time playing solitaire?
-----------------------------

mk1gti wanders off to kitchen with glazed look in his eyes, slowly opens fridge door, pulls out hefeweizen and pours. . .
posted by mk1gti at 4:22 PM on January 3, 2006


I'm hoping that after this all comes to pass that Grover Norquist will be relegated to a street corner begging for spare change to continue funding his little enterprises. . .
posted by mk1gti at 4:25 PM on January 3, 2006


"New York Times reporter Anne E. Kornblut falsely stated that Democrats accepted campaign contributions from indicted former lobbyist Jack Abramoff. In fact, only Republicans received contributions directly from Abramoff....a Media Matters for America search of the Center for Responsive Politics database of campaign contributions did not find any contributions from Abramoff to Democrats or Democratic leadership political action committees....In fact, while Democrats have received contributions from Abramoff's lobbying groups and his clients, Kornblut's statement ignores the difference between accepting contributions from groups linked to Abramoff, which is legal and proper, and taking contributions in exchange for official actions, which is illegal, and which is at the heart of the ongoing investigations."
posted by ericb at 4:37 PM on January 3, 2006


. . . . and the poop thickens . . . .
posted by mk1gti at 4:45 PM on January 3, 2006


Let The Housecleaning Begin!

Abramoff plea bargain to bring corruption probe to Congress

I am surprised that no one from the conservative end of things has come forward to say 'Let the chips fall where they may, if guilty then off with their heads'. It seems the rest of the people on Me-Fi have no problem with convicting lib/dem/repub/conservative, why don't those who identify as right-wing or republican? Just how brainwashed are you people anyway?

Why don't you pass the time playing a little solitaire?
posted by mk1gti at 4:57 PM on January 3, 2006


mk1gti and daq: quit being PPs.
posted by five fresh fish at 5:16 PM on January 3, 2006


Damn fff, that stings. It buuuuhhhhhhnnnnnnnsssssss. Ouch.
posted by mk1gti at 5:18 PM on January 3, 2006


One. . . . More . . . . Time. . . . ! ! !

I know this has been posted upthread, but just had to post it again, some of us may just be getting home from work about now and might want to give it a once-over. Chuckles and loud guffaws to follow. . . .
posted by mk1gti at 5:29 PM on January 3, 2006


Certainly there will be some dirty Republicans going down but I still hear the right wing talking points about the legal campaign contributions and little about the large illegal slush funds.
Also, the "Dems too!" meme is being pushed as hard as possible even though it is an easily disproved lie.
I'm not talking about Instacracker of little green snotballs or sludge but the main television news channels. Trying to be "balanced" and all.
Clue train: sometimes there's no "two sides" to a story you "liberal media" stenographers! "He said / she said" is NOT reporting you lazy bastards! Do your homework that you get paid big bucks for and quit reading of the Republican crib sheet talking points you get faxed from Karl dammit!

Whew! Glad I got that off my chest.

Oh, and you have a very good point mk1gti about Stalin and Mao regarding fascism. Modern China would easily qualify as very fascist when you think about it.
posted by nofundy at 7:19 AM on January 4, 2006


s/ Instacracker of/Instacracker or
s/ reading of/reading off

posted by nofundy at 7:22 AM on January 4, 2006


The Talking Point is:

"Members of Both Parties..."
posted by empath at 7:28 AM on January 4, 2006


Good luck with that talking point GOP. However, I think the Dems escape this one only because they were out of power. That very old saying about power corrupting and absolute power corrupting absolutely applies here. In the face of nearly absolute power the GOP, especially its leaders, has become incredibly corrupt. Nothing could be better for the country than for the Dems to take back the Senate this Fall and restore some balance to the government.
posted by caddis at 7:38 AM on January 4, 2006


I think what is missing here is that most dems took money from orgs that have, in a lot of cases, a loose affiliation with Abramoff (Good enough for the connection though). Whereas, on your DeLay side of the aisle, they took cash right out of his hand. That's a big difference, not that the MSM will tell that to Mr Notimefornews, but the NY Times did: See Multimedia link
posted by psmealey at 8:11 AM on January 4, 2006


Scanlon and him more than $30 million over 26 months.

Jesus Tapdancing Christ. . . Think of what that money could have bought for public schools, health care, anything other than bullshit political influence and enriching a new generation of D.C. carpetbaggers . . .
posted by mk1gti at 11:23 AM on January 4, 2006


Wouldn’t he be subject as well to Indian tribal law?

“I am surprised that no one from the conservative end of things has come forward to say 'Let the chips fall where they may, if guilty then off with their heads'.” - posted by mk1gti

Well, the off with their heads thing is a bit much. But far be it for me to criticise hyperbole.

I don’t think a presidential pardon would change my current (lousy) opinion of Bush. But I doubt - given the Miers debacle - that he’d be able to get away with it.

Dems have had their fair share of corrupt bastards, and Clinton did pardon a lot of assholes as he left office.

But since mk1gti said ‘conservative’ (as opposed to neo-con or Republican) if he’s guilty I’d like to see the maximum possible penalty under the law in federal prison. In addition, I’d like to see those penalties enhanced and the corruption laws greatly tightened with much more oversight.
Fair enough?
posted by Smedleyman at 3:30 PM on January 4, 2006


$20,194,000 = Amount Of Cash Abramoff Stashed In Secret Accounts...
posted by ericb at 3:44 PM on January 4, 2006


When I say 'off with their heads', I meant that metaphorically, just so we're clear. As far as maximum penalties, that's something the judicial system really needs to focus on when sentencing cases like these. This is far more serious than stealing an old ladie's purse while she's walking down the street.
posted by mk1gti at 7:54 PM on January 4, 2006



posted by ericb at 3:00 PM on January 5, 2006


“When I say 'off with their heads', I meant that metaphorically, just so we're clear” - posted by mk1gti

Yup. I tend to do that a lot m’self. Thus the pot/kettle = black avoidance by me.

That’s damn funny ericb
posted by Smedleyman at 3:43 PM on January 5, 2006


mk1gti is the author of just over 25% of the comments on this post.
posted by Coda at 10:13 PM on January 5, 2006


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