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100 Best Places to Work
January 18, 2006 3:36 PM   Subscribe

The 100 Best Companies to Work For. The Top Ten starting with #1: Genentech, Wegmans, Valero Energy, Griffin Hospital, W.L. Gore, Container Store, Vision Service Plan, J.M. Smucker, REI, S.C. Johnson & Son. But The Complete List has some surprises. It puts Microsoft at #42 behind Starbucks at #29. (Starbucks pays $500 towards tuition to part-timers who work there for more than a year). By clicking on the company links on the List you get stats on employee salaries, turnover, minority hiring etc, learning for instance, that the most common job at Microsoft pays $107,000/year.
posted by storybored (53 comments total) 1 user marked this as a favorite

 
My boss lets me read MetaFilter at work.
posted by Faint of Butt at 3:50 PM on January 18, 2006


I am surprised not to find google on that list. I'm not surprised that I don't really care.
posted by allen.spaulding at 3:51 PM on January 18, 2006


Gee, DoD didn't make the list again.
posted by fixedgear at 4:11 PM on January 18, 2006


Number 100 is Nike. You've got to be fucking kidding me.
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 4:11 PM on January 18, 2006


the most common job at Microsoft pays $107,000/year.

Yes, but how many Gates Fellators could one company need.

I kid.

I have a sneaking suspicion that employees are rewarded somehow for stuffing the ballot box. Can't prove it of course, but it wouldn't suprise me.
posted by jonmc at 4:29 PM on January 18, 2006


Number 100 is Nike. You've got to be fucking kidding me.

"Their fingers are the only ones small enough to properly insert the gromets into the air holes on the sides of the shoes!"
posted by interrobang at 4:30 PM on January 18, 2006


I was disturbed to find that some of these companies had somehow made their way into my portfolio. Dumped 'em!
posted by crank at 4:33 PM on January 18, 2006


Why exactly would you expect Nike to not be on the list? Or Microsoft? Why do you think that working there would be so horrible?
posted by smackfu at 4:46 PM on January 18, 2006


Number 100 is Nike. You've got to be fucking kidding me.

They typically pay triple the average national wage in their third-world sweatshops. I'd make shoes for 12 hours a day for $106,000/year.
posted by iron chef morimoto at 4:47 PM on January 18, 2006


Wow - the three best companies in my state (NY) are American Express, Ernst & Young, and Goldman Sachs.

I don't know about you, but I'm having a darned-tootin' hard time believing that this brilliantly perfect list was written by some wingtip-wearing cretin @ FORTUNE Magazine!
posted by MaxVonCretin at 4:52 PM on January 18, 2006


They typically pay triple the average national wage in their third-world sweatshops. I'd make shoes for 12 hours a day for $106,000/year.

Wow, sign me up to be an eleven-year-old all over again!
posted by interrobang at 4:54 PM on January 18, 2006


They're sixteen.
posted by iron chef morimoto at 5:02 PM on January 18, 2006


Who knows how old they are when Nike refuses to release the locations of all their factories?
posted by allen.spaulding at 5:04 PM on January 18, 2006


My bank fell off the list, after being there in 2003, 2004, and 2005. I don't know whether to be worried or overjoyed.
posted by WolfDaddy at 5:06 PM on January 18, 2006


I know people who've worked for American Express, Goldman Sachs, and several of the other companies there. I'm very skeptical about this list as a result.

In particularly, when I worked on the Street, Goldman was notorious for high aggression, high pressure, and insane work hours. Perhaps they've changed, but I've not heard anything good about them.

I'm also VERY skeptical considering that Google, where I work, is not on the top 100. It's very very hard to imagine how a workplace could be any better than this.
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 5:16 PM on January 18, 2006


I worked for three of the businesses on this list. Two were law firms that are accurately described as great places to work. The third, Nordstrom's, was only so-so, although that may have resulted from my being a stock clerk in the women's clothing department, which was much more difficult than any job I have held since.
posted by brain_drain at 5:18 PM on January 18, 2006


Agreed re Google's snub -- the free gourmet lunches alone should merit a slot on the list.
posted by brain_drain at 5:19 PM on January 18, 2006


Speaking of Nike, according to their profile page, the most common salaried position there is "Professional/Specialist General". WTF? That's pretty opaque.
posted by mhum at 5:19 PM on January 18, 2006


Aha, now we find out why:

"About 1,500 companies contacted us or were recruited to participate; of them, 466 finished the exhaustive survey process. (Any company that is at least seven years old with more than 1,000 U.S. employees is eligible.)"

So they only considered 1500 companies, many of which were apparently self-selected. Of those, over 1000 fell out of their "exhaustive" survey.
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 5:21 PM on January 18, 2006


The company I work for is on that list. It is a good place to work. It is not, however, a good place to work because of the work; it's a good place to work because of the compensation and perks.

Arguably there are much better places for me to work if my idea of "best" includes personal satisfaction and growth.

That doesn't mean I don't get those here; I've just gotten more of them at other companies not on the list. But those companies didn't offer a lot of the perks this one does, and I made a lot less money there.
posted by davejay at 5:40 PM on January 18, 2006


Wow - the three best companies in my state (NY) are American Express, Ernst & Young, and Goldman Sachs.


When you click on the state lists, companies are in alphabetical order. In fact the highest-ranking NY company, at #2 overall, is Wegmans Food Markets. Unless you're one o' them evil down-staters who doesn't realize that Rochester is actually in New York...
posted by Creosote at 5:46 PM on January 18, 2006


Most of the people who have worked for better companies leave microsoft as quickly as they can. Most of the people who still work at Microsoft have never worked for a better company.

The others on the list are probably similar.

Drink the kool-aid, it is tasty!
posted by b1tr0t at 5:59 PM on January 18, 2006


I didn't know this before but there's a research company that comes up with the ranking. On its website you can nominate any company that's missing from the list that you feel is worthy.
posted by storybored at 6:03 PM on January 18, 2006


I was disturbed to find that some of these companies had somehow made their way into my portfolio. Dumped 'em!

It's not part of the online version but the print version of the Fortune article has this to say:

"Deloitte Consulting tracked...shareholder returns of the 56 publicly traded firms on the 2005 list...Fortune's best employers not only consistently beat the S&P 500 they walloped it".
posted by storybored at 6:14 PM on January 18, 2006


Most of the people who have worked for better companies leave microsoft as quickly as they can. Most of the people who still work at Microsoft have never worked for a better company.

Maybe ideologically driven workers, but my experience has been the opposite. Short of Google, you won't find better compensation (and that's more equal now that the stock has started to level off). To be fair, there's a huge variance in how good day-to-day work is at MSFT depending on your project and managers, but that's true of almost any large company. I've worked for many companies and interviewed at quite a few more, and the only one I'd really consider leaving MSFT for is GOOG [and even then it depends on the project].
posted by wildcrdj at 6:18 PM on January 18, 2006


davejay's comment mirrors my experience with one of the companies on the list (Booz Allen Hamiltion). In fact I accepted a position there based on the fact it was ranked as a such a great place to work. But the work was somewhat mind-numbing and the management seemed to have pointy hair syndrome at times. However they had good perks, but there often wasn't enough time to use them.

Another company on the list, Qualcomm seems a pretty good place to work, at least the people I've dealt with from there seemed pretty happy with their employer.
posted by forforf at 6:56 PM on January 18, 2006


Re: the Nike factories in Asia. Factory workers are technically not Nike employees, as factories are owned by subcontractors (the one I visited in Vietnam was Korean owned). Only a few Nike employees are on hand for QC.

And the pay beats what they'd earn in the rice fields.
posted by b_thinky at 7:07 PM on January 18, 2006


LOL they put Station Casinos on that list. I have experience there and wouldn't recommend it.

What makes it so great?
When the casino operator asked employees about their dreams, more than 1,200 said they dreamed of being a U.S. citizen. So Station offers free English courses, a 24-hour bilingual hotline, and citizenship clinics.

posted by b_thinky at 7:12 PM on January 18, 2006


Where is "For yourself" on that list?
posted by gottabefunky at 7:13 PM on January 18, 2006


Google did not make the list simply because it's not old enough. I think the companies have to be 7 years old. Maybe it's 5. Either way, Google wasn't old enough.

Apple simply didn't respond to the survey.
posted by drstein at 7:28 PM on January 18, 2006


I worked at Starbucks and I have to say, despite whatever negative can be said about them, they treat their employees really well, especially compared to similar establishments. Full benefits even for part-time employees, bonuses, student scholarships, they even give loans to people in emergency situations. A coworker had to fly home to the Philippines for a family emergency and they advanced her her paycheck, interest free, for the plane tickets, to be paid back on installments out of her check.
posted by piers at 9:12 PM on January 18, 2006


I've also heard good things about Starbucks. You can earn a decent, living wage there or you can use it to get an education and move forward.

Looking at this list again, I see that there are a lot of places that pay well but make you work very hard. GOOG is no exception to this. Really, in the long run (particularly if you are married which I am not), this is not a Good Thing.
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 9:30 PM on January 18, 2006


Morrison and Foerster ranked a distant second in average pay.

Too bad there's no "best URL" category.
posted by crabintheocean at 9:45 PM on January 18, 2006


Earnst & Young? Maybe a good place to work, if you don't mind a reputation for being a waste of space. I've and occasion to use their services, and they have consistently left me unsatisfied, and I didn't like their people, either. I have similar issues with PCW.
posted by Goofyy at 11:15 PM on January 18, 2006


HomeBanc Mortgage

What makes it so great?
Prayers frequently open meetings at this faith-based mortgage banker. Dr. Dwight "Ike" Reighard, a former pastor, is "chief people officer" - he reports directly to the CEO and shepherds the company flock.


Hmm...good for some I suppose.
posted by gfrobe at 1:26 AM on January 19, 2006


And the pay beats what they'd earn in the rice fields.

It really boggles my mind that some people, who otherwise claim to have the interests of the poor in mind, want to ban "sweatshops".
posted by hoverboards don't work on water at 3:41 AM on January 19, 2006


Well, it would have been nice to have a "sort by industry" option. Who cares what the pay is, or the benefits are, if the work's not in your field?
posted by GhostintheMachine at 5:29 AM on January 19, 2006


So, um...how exactly do I go about getting a job at Google?
Seriously. TELL me.
posted by Dormant Gorilla at 6:46 AM on January 19, 2006


What about best *call centers* to work in, it seems like that's the only jobs left in this country these days . . . .
posted by mk1gti at 7:55 AM on January 19, 2006


So, um...how exactly do I go about getting a job at Google?
Seriously. TELL me.


You send them a resume. That's how my friend working there got his job.

Alternatively, you could try breaking in ninja-style, slicing the security guard's throat before crawling through an air vent leading to the boardroom. There, you appear suddenly in front of the CEO, where you silently present him a picture of his family, bound and crying in an attic somewhere. He glares up at you and asks, voice trembling slightly through gritted teeth, "what do you want from me, you piece of shit?"

"I'm looking for an entry-level position, sir."
posted by iron chef morimoto at 8:06 AM on January 19, 2006


"I'm looking for an entry-level position, sir."
-------------------------
Such as . . . oh. . . . a Call center job !
posted by mk1gti at 8:25 AM on January 19, 2006


I used to work at Ernst & Young, and it was, indeed, a good place to work. Good pay, good benefits, and a corporate culture that rewarded good work. The management wasn't terribly hierarchical, so I could easily contact higher-ups if need be. They were very sensitive to discrimination, ergonomics, and other less-tangible benefits, too. When I left, they threw me a great going-away party, and I wasn't management or anything. I honestly felt appreciated the whole time I was there.

Oh, yes, I left because I hated working with a bunch of type-A accountants. Also, from what I hear, I left at just the right time, as things have gotten less fun in the last few years. But I enjoyed it while I was there.
posted by MrMoonPie at 9:07 AM on January 19, 2006


Such as . . . oh. . . . a Call center job !

I'm guessing you worked in a call center at some point. I'm guessing you didn't particularly care for it.
posted by iron chef morimoto at 9:15 AM on January 19, 2006


you're guessing correctly. I'm still there. . . pray for me . . .
posted by mk1gti at 9:49 AM on January 19, 2006


I'm surprised Costco didn't make that list.
posted by SisterHavana at 9:58 AM on January 19, 2006


SisterHavana, I am also surprised Costco isn't there. I was hoping to find more places to strengthen my "Big Companies Aren't Always Horrible" list for the Wal-Mart debate I continually find myself in.

And mk1gti, I work in a call center and it's by the best place I've been in terms of pay, benefits, and extra perks. Free company meals all the time, great insurance, stock options, huge gift cards for the holidays...I've had better positions in name, but for once I don't hate coming to work. It's all about who's running the joint.
posted by rollbiz at 10:30 AM on January 19, 2006


Yeah, I know what you mean, I've worked in call centers where it's pretty good, and this one is pretty bad.
I won't say where, but I've been in and out of call centers over the years and I've never had greater incentive to save money for the sake of moving to a different job.
One of the highest employee turnover rates I've ever seen. Middle management, call center employee, the pet squirrel . . .
Amazing in it's mediocrity, arrogance and stupidity.
I honestly wonder if anyone in senior management has run a call center or had any call center experience at all.
posted by mk1gti at 10:50 AM on January 19, 2006


Fair enough, been there too, and I do agree that places like your current employer tend to be the rule rather than the exception. As to why, I think your assesment answers the question. Crappy environment/pay/perks means high turnover, high turnover means low personal investment. In such an environment, one only stays until they can find something else and only works hard enough not to get fired.
posted by rollbiz at 10:59 AM on January 19, 2006


rollbiz
Cook, mk1gti needs some lightbulbs! (^_^)
posted by mk1gti at 11:04 AM on January 19, 2006


'scuse me, *cool*
posted by mk1gti at 11:19 AM on January 19, 2006


Then I'm your man!

*cough*

For lightbulbs. I'm your man for lightbulbs.
posted by rollbiz at 1:18 PM on January 19, 2006


boy, sorry to complain but around here today it's just one big imploding sphere of suck . . .
posted by mk1gti at 1:28 PM on January 19, 2006


here today meaning the biz, not Me-Fi.

Sorry if there might have been any misunderstanding. . .
posted by mk1gti at 4:57 PM on January 19, 2006


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