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Graph Paper PDF Generator
January 24, 2006 10:50 AM   Subscribe

Because graph paper wants to be free... Free downloadable graph paper ... plain, lined, multi width, hexagonal, even semi-bisected trapezoid. All free, in PDF format, for all your open source graphing needs. (Let's just hope the PIAA doesn't catch on.)
posted by crunchland (42 comments total)

 
Nice. I have no need for this at the moment but glad this resource exists....

Looks like an great boon for D&Ds and Wargamers making maps...

Or I could just download some old-school 2nd grade penmanship paper and practice....
posted by davros42 at 10:56 AM on January 24, 2006


Bless you. I needed this so badly.
posted by Alison at 10:57 AM on January 24, 2006


Dungeon Masters rejoice!
posted by Peter H at 10:57 AM on January 24, 2006


shit, I got jinxed by davros, dammit
posted by Peter H at 10:58 AM on January 24, 2006


Get Your Nerd On
posted by Peter H at 11:04 AM on January 24, 2006


No logarithmic?!, you bastards.
posted by 517 at 11:04 AM on January 24, 2006


Very cool. I could have used this in school.
(And a great way to "stick it to the man"!)
posted by R. Mutt at 11:07 AM on January 24, 2006


Is there a site where you can print plain paper, without the grids?
posted by iconomy at 11:07 AM on January 24, 2006


Is it actually cheaper to print this at home? I'm not saying it isn't; I'm just curious. It's a great resource either way. I've actually set up and printed tablature staves from MS Office when I was desperate, so I'm down with the concept.

On preview: there's a link to logarithmic at the bottom, 517.
posted by Songdog at 11:08 AM on January 24, 2006


Added to my ever-growing links page. Thanks!
posted by sciurus at 11:08 AM on January 24, 2006


Is there a site where you can print plain paper, without the grids?

You can find it over bittorrent if you look around. But I gotta tell ya, it drains your white-ink tanks *real* fast.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 11:13 AM on January 24, 2006 [1 favorite]


Back in the mid-80s, I knew I'd really arrived as a D&D nerd when I started needing hex paper for maps. That's the sign you've made it to the big leagues.
posted by COBRA! at 11:15 AM on January 24, 2006


Songdog writes "Is it actually cheaper to print this at home? I'm not saying it isn't; I'm just curious."

If you need 24"x35" sheets.
posted by Mitheral at 11:22 AM on January 24, 2006


I've been using this for sudoku.
posted by teg at 11:22 AM on January 24, 2006


No isometric? Damn, that stuff's pretty good for 3D D&D floorplans :)
posted by kaemaril at 11:22 AM on January 24, 2006


I just want the record to show that my attack of opportunity would have totally hit if you had downloaded the right graph paper.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 11:29 AM on January 24, 2006


kaemaril: There are links for isometric, logorithmic, etc. at the bottom of the page.
posted by LordSludge at 11:31 AM on January 24, 2006


The website also has links for free calendar layouts, as well as funny facts about a number of British authors. Eclectic and awesome.
posted by bove at 11:42 AM on January 24, 2006


Back in the mid-80s, I knew I'd really arrived as a D&D nerd...

so I promptly left.
posted by OmieWise at 11:50 AM on January 24, 2006


Thank you. I really need this for my physics lab. It never occurred to me to look for some online, oddly enough.
posted by feathermeat at 11:56 AM on January 24, 2006


And royalty free music in various styles. Yes, this is truly The Best of the Web.
posted by maudlin at 12:14 PM on January 24, 2006


Is it actually cheaper to print this at home?

It is when you print it at work instead! mwahahahaha....hah...ah
posted by rollbiz at 12:27 PM on January 24, 2006


What the hell does the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association have to do with any of this?
posted by ND¢ at 12:55 PM on January 24, 2006


LordSludge : I didn't see one for isometric. What's the link text?
posted by kaemaril at 12:57 PM on January 24, 2006


Windows users might also want to check out the last freeware version of Graph Paper Printer. You know, for when you need some new custom graph paper quickly, but can't get online.
posted by umrain at 1:32 PM on January 24, 2006


This should be expanded for linear/log, log/log, polar, and Smith Charts... but it's still pretty cool. Thanks.
posted by rocket88 at 1:37 PM on January 24, 2006


wasn't there also a site on mefi a year (two?) ago that had everything you need to know about paper and envelope dimensions, units of measure, templates for mailings, etc? Wish I could find that.
posted by Grod at 1:39 PM on January 24, 2006


That's a cool resource. Thanks.
posted by soyjoy at 1:49 PM on January 24, 2006


Where I am a student some professors continue to insist that exams be written in "blue books" these are 4 pieces of legal sized paper, very cheap, oriented landscape, ruled horizontally, folded and stapled into a booklet of 8 leaves. The result is 16 pages of semi-opaque, blue-ruled pages snuggled inside a cover, also blue bearing a banner set in letter-spaced full and small cap Helvetica characters "Use Your Imagination" below, in 72 points bold Helvetica with a two point underline it says "Blue Book". These things cost $.50+tax in the school store. I got fed up with the recently and started making my own "Gray Book"s. With Adobe InDesign I was able to quickly format the pages, add more attractive margins (I kept the line height -- against my better judgement) and page numbers. Impositioning took another minute. I spent several minutes more creating a cover mimicking the layout but using a Neo Sans Ultra for the title "Gray Book" and a sans serif of my own design for the other elements (logo, name/subject/class etc. fields). The result is a more modern and attractive (though still horrible, I mean, writing an exam by hand? Primitives) examination book that is essentially free if printed on campus. Only one problem, I did this at the end of last semester and have not yet had an opportunity to attempt to use one of my custom books. Oh well.
posted by Grod at 1:58 PM on January 24, 2006


OmieWise writes "so I promptly left."


Omiewise wins the thread.
posted by orthogonality at 2:11 PM on January 24, 2006


Most useful. Thank you!!
posted by KevinKarl at 2:26 PM on January 24, 2006


Tooo coool! See, I KNEW the Internet thingy was good for SOMETHING besides Pr0n and MeFi!
posted by TheStorm at 2:40 PM on January 24, 2006


Damn, this is a FPP? I've had this del.icio.us'd since November last year!
posted by TheDonF at 2:50 PM on January 24, 2006


TheDonF: May I humbly suggest that you may wish to share more of your links as FPPs?
posted by stet at 3:42 PM on January 24, 2006


That polar graph looks really pretty... I sure wish I had a use for it.
posted by Citizen Premier at 3:58 PM on January 24, 2006


Is it actually cheaper to print this at home?

This will be my schools only real contribution to my education.
posted by phrontist at 4:21 PM on January 24, 2006


I don't get logarithmic paper... I see it used in audio all the time. What's the point?
posted by phrontist at 4:24 PM on January 24, 2006


phrontist, because exponential curves turn into straight lines on log paper.

I seem to remember a joke from my undergrad days in engineering that went something along the lines that an engineer's happiest moment is getting a straight line on log-log paper. For a pretty wide definition of "joke".
posted by GuyZero at 4:28 PM on January 24, 2006


Music Paper - 30+ varieties of sheet music blanks, in PDF.

The value of log paper ... ah, GuyZero answered it.

Toy example: your results are 4, 8, 24, 32, 64 (plus or minus some error). Which point doesn't fit the trend?

Plotting on log(2) paper, the results would be 2, 3, 4.6, 5, 6. You could more easily spot the third value as being out of line.
posted by kurumi at 4:42 PM on January 24, 2006


Blank Sheet Music - design your own
posted by missbossy at 5:11 PM on January 24, 2006


Best of the web. (Seriously).

I also greatly appreciate missbossy's link.
posted by Ynoxas at 7:40 PM on January 24, 2006


I just went back to use it again (a couple weeks after it was originally posted). I don't know if anyone will read this but... the calendar generators now let you specify landscape or portrait, and what day of the week to start on. Awesome stuff, very useful.
posted by selfmedicating at 11:25 AM on February 3, 2006


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