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Cello shots
February 26, 2006 10:04 PM   Subscribe

A Cello Rondo A cello piece digitally combined from 37 different cello parts all played by the same musician. With funky video. [Qucktime, 45mb], [Quicktime, 22mb]. Other formats available through the link. via Digg.
posted by ontic (17 comments total)

 
youtube is speedy
posted by Mach5 at 10:15 PM on February 26, 2006


Wow. The video in an of itself is pretty amazing, but the fact that he played AND composed every part of this? Jesus. That's a sort of drive I'll never have. Kudos, dude.
posted by borkingchikapa at 10:43 PM on February 26, 2006


Okay.
Too bad he frequently resorted to the usual dance-beat gimmick to 'modernize' a classical sound.
It was much better in those sections where he dropped that artificial and simplistic ruse.
posted by HTuttle at 10:58 PM on February 26, 2006


Hmm, site's dead already. The YouTube version works fine, though.

HTuttle, I only really noticed that in the very beginning. Once he got it going, it sounded more like a more traditional latin-style beat than anything too modern.

I thought the video was ridiculously cheesy, but fun!
posted by JZig at 11:23 PM on February 26, 2006


You think that's cool? Zoe Keating does it live: video (takes a while to load).

She has a foot pedal thingie which lets her layer sounds. I had the pleasure of seeing her perform live (she opened for Imogen Heap on her more recent U.S. tour).
posted by amuseDetachment at 2:27 AM on February 27, 2006


Not sure I'd call this 37 "parts" -- as in, if you wanted to exactly reproduce the piece in live performance you'd need 37 players. Seems to me to be around 15 (though the website refers to 23 "tracks"). To give an idea of what I mean, the opening 20 bars introduces only 7 parts -- is there any point where there's another 30 voices on top of that? Just sayin'.

But great work, nonetheless. I'm always astounded at what an amazingly versatile instrument the cello is. This just makes me long for the days when I had enough time to play regularly.

(And was there a cat with a halo in that video, or was it just me?)
posted by bright cold day at 3:31 AM on February 27, 2006


If you're interested in musicians doing live loop-based music, check out Stuart Wyatt and Andre LaFosse.

I found them, along with Zoe Keating and lots of other people doing interesting stuff, on Loopers Delight, where the mailing list will tell you everything you need to know to get started if you want to try it yourself.
posted by fuzz at 4:34 AM on February 27, 2006


Look for the full video of KT Tunstall doing a live solo rendition of "Black Horse And The Cherry Tree" on "Later With Jools Holland". Pretty great.

Also linked heavily is Kid Beyond's use of Ableton Live.
posted by XiBe at 4:48 AM on February 27, 2006


If you're interested in musicians doing live loop-based music, check out Stuart Wyatt and Andre LaFosse.

Additionally, check out Andrew Bird. He'll play violin using both a loop pedal and an octave pedal, enabling him to sound like an entire string section, which he'll then sing, whistle, play guitar, and play glockenspiel over.

His drummer/opener, Martin Dosh, performs similarly amazing feats with keyboards, drums, and assorted noises. Video here.
posted by ludwig_van at 5:59 AM on February 27, 2006


Bill Frisell also does a lot of great looping stuff with jazz guitar. His work with Kelly Joe Phelps just blew me out of the water.
posted by The White Hat at 6:13 AM on February 27, 2006


The music is good, the video clinches it.

Bad green screen, cheesy wipes, 80's text effects, "WOW", a cat with a friggin' halo! Doesn't get better than that.
posted by fungible at 6:13 AM on February 27, 2006


And don't miss the delightful Gideon Freudmann. I saw him live (he was the act right after Jake Bell, who I was assisting, and there was a little light hearted dialog with us as we carried our gear off stage, especially our weird, angular keyboard stands). He was just incredible — a great performer, and audience charmer, and a very nice fellow. He stole the show that night with only himself, a boat-anchor shaped electric cello, and a few pedals. Some samples here. At the time, Robin Hood Changes His Oil (10M quicktime) was the cream. But that was long ago, and there's plenty of new material. Enjoy!
posted by SteelyDuran at 8:19 AM on February 27, 2006


Same thing (but/also live, with an expanse of effects pedals at his feet) on violin -- google for "Ed Allyne Johnson". I caught him on TV way way back ('92 perhaps?) shortly after finding his 'Purple Electric Violin Concerto' album in the stores.
posted by devbrain at 8:25 AM on February 27, 2006


I can't believe a discussion of this type of music could go without mentioning Frippertonics. Originally done with tape, but now done with digital delay units.
posted by Eekacat at 9:52 AM on February 27, 2006


Proof positive that stoners can do great things, IMO. Not so much re: the music, but certainly the video effects. Ye godz.
posted by five fresh fish at 10:14 AM on February 27, 2006


We can't leave Keller Williams out of a discussion on looping.
posted by wsg at 11:25 AM on February 27, 2006


Too bad he frequently resorted to the usual dance-beat gimmick to 'modernize' a classical sound.
It was much better in those sections where he dropped that artificial and simplistic ruse. -Htuttle


At least he does not resort to the Vanessa Mae / Bond practice of using techno beats to cover up poor playing.
posted by BarePaw at 1:03 PM on February 27, 2006


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