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"I wanted to be a mother who bakes.
January 1, 2001 10:29 PM   Subscribe

"I wanted to be a mother who bakes. But then I found out it's illegal." While I can understand being afraid of a Hepatitis or E. Coli outbreak, I can't help but think this is simply another example of a school district of applying really stupid rules to a situation.
posted by ookamaka (10 comments total)

 
Isn't this what you Naderite crypto-socialists wanted? Isn't this in the in the interests of "child safety"? Isn't this the same thing that motivated the Toronto school board to rip up all the playground equipment and suggest kids wear helmets?
posted by johnnydark at 8:43 AM on January 2, 2001


Isn't this what you Naderite crypto-socialists wanted?

If you are saying that all Nader supporters are "crypto-socialists" (whatever that means), then I take issue with your loaded question. I voted for Nader, yet this is not a policy I would prefer. However, school districts often implement policy based on concerns of parents. In today's schools with thousands of students, it's impossible for administrators to get to know the parents and really communicate with them, thus these kinds of knee-jerk policies.

My question is why would schools be letting parents bring anything for mass consumption by the kiddies, anyway? What if I don't want my kid loading up on sugar every afternoon? What if he's type I diabetic? Parents never brought treats to my elementary school! :)

But seriously, schools attempt to take seriously children's health by offering balanced meals for lunches and encouraging physical exercise. They shouldn't be handing out treats whenever a loving parent decides to be generous.
posted by daveadams at 10:20 AM on January 2, 2001


But seriously, schools attempt to take seriously children's health by offering balanced meals for lunches and encouraging physical exercise.

My understanding is that many high schools now have McDonalds, Taco Bell, and Pizza Hut outlets right in the cafeterias. So much for "balanced meals."
posted by rushmc at 10:24 AM on January 2, 2001


Remember, kiddies, if the food Mommy gives you doesn't have a barcode on it, it means she doesn't really love you.
posted by harmful at 12:06 PM on January 2, 2001


I know at the school district I'm in, parents never brought snacks in randomly - they would bake or buy treats for holiday parties and school-related events, and up until 4th grade the occassional birthday. Now we're not allowed to call them "holiday parties" (because of political correctness and all), but many parents still like to bake now and then as if it's a confirmation of their support of their child.

Are there any states other than Oregon who require the "store-bought snack" policy for schools?
posted by elf_baby at 1:05 PM on January 2, 2001


having 2 very young nephews, I can see the atmosphere that that brings about decisions like this one. In the US, people are getting so paranoid about their children it's crippling parents.

As far as the crypto-socialists remark goes... it's a knee-jerk response to a serious hepatitis outbreak. After talking to my sister about something similar, she said her gut reaction might be something similar at first... and she's a hardcore right-wing republican.
posted by tj at 1:45 PM on January 2, 2001


In the US, people are getting so paranoid about their children it's crippling parents.

Perfectly put; I've been banging this drum for years, and haven't gotten it phrased that well.

Does anyone have any [pointers to] hard numbers on how much "stranger danger" (or freakazoid non-stranger) type stuff like that actually *happens* in the US each year, vs the number of kids?
posted by baylink at 2:43 PM on January 2, 2001


For one, this article was long and drawn out, mainly because the real content was rather small. second the rule is in place after a major breakout of hepatitis, this isn't just someone being paranoid.
posted by thirdball at 3:33 PM on January 2, 2001


This is not just an elementary school thing. As I recently discovered, the SUNY campus at which I teach prohibits students from bringing homemade goodies to events supported with university funds--for the usual liability reasons. No word on whether we faculty are under similar restrictions. (I just bring chocolate on a regular basis.)


posted by thomas j wise at 6:10 PM on January 2, 2001


My understanding is that many high schools now have McDonalds, Taco Bell, and Pizza Hut outlets right in the cafeterias. So much for "balanced meals."

Perhaps that's the case. In my high school (which I attended not tooo terribly long ago ;), it was amazing to us that we actually had access to a coke machine. The general policy of the school was to encourage kids to eat school lunches. We had several choices each day, but they were all somewhat "balanced."
posted by daveadams at 7:56 AM on January 3, 2001


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