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Flood Maps
March 24, 2006 9:58 PM   Subscribe

Sea levels are on the rise. Flood Maps mashes up NASA elevation data and Google Maps, and offers a zoomable localized visualization of the effects.
posted by stbalbach (35 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite

 
The flood map app needs some work, but the results are very interesting.

More interesting, though, is the impact on all that fresh water on the dynamics of the atlantic ocean. Could get very chilly up in Northern Europe.
posted by b1tr0t at 10:04 PM on March 24, 2006



At 14m... half of Brooklyn is out... half of the Village... half of Harlem... in SF, half of the Mission, all of South of Market, the Marina.... Sacramento is sitting in the middle of a lake.. all of Provincetown, Cape Cod... the lower third of Lousiana... the lower fourth of the Florida panhandle... all of the Bahamas...
posted by bukharin at 10:51 PM on March 24, 2006


Lets hope the Army Corps of Engineers learns something about levee building from the Dutch.
posted by b1tr0t at 11:05 PM on March 24, 2006


All together now: "It's the end of the world as we know it, and I... feel... fiiiine..."
posted by twsf at 11:07 PM on March 24, 2006




Yes, let's hope.
posted by bukharin at 11:07 PM on March 24, 2006


Yes, let's hope.

It's not a question of Corps not having the knowledge or talent to build on that scale. The Corps can only build projects that Congress authorizes, and for which Congress appropriates sufficient funds.
posted by ereshkigal45 at 11:15 PM on March 24, 2006


Also, flagged as fantastic. I've been waiting for someone to develop this app.
posted by ereshkigal45 at 11:16 PM on March 24, 2006


The Corps can only build projects that Congress authorizes, and for which Congress appropriates sufficient funds.

Bah. There are schools in Iraq to build.
posted by bukharin at 11:25 PM on March 24, 2006



I'll agree, too, that this is a wonderful post.
posted by bukharin at 11:25 PM on March 24, 2006


Looks like SimCity floods.

Otherwise, it's very disconcerting to see that Boston is fucked if this ever comes to pass. Wonder how much water it will take for Worcester (Central MA) to become oceanfront property. I'd be interested to know, I'll set up my tourist trap accordingly.
posted by rollbiz at 11:29 PM on March 24, 2006


hahahahah, I'm getting free lakefront property! Hahahahahah! ! ! Seriously, this is the suck. . . Even with the lakefront property. . .
posted by mk1gti at 11:31 PM on March 24, 2006


My house is still dry at 14m, and the Sat Image should be the default. Much better that way.

Cool find though.
posted by fenriq at 11:57 PM on March 24, 2006


Thanks for this, I've been looking for something like this for a few days now.
posted by numlok at 11:59 PM on March 24, 2006


south florida will be fine. they'll just move it back to new jersey.
posted by srs at 12:29 AM on March 25, 2006




My local nuclear power station is thoughtfully provided with its own island (see sat view).

Unfortunately it doesn't look like the visitors center (north) is gonna fit.
posted by Freaky at 6:30 AM on March 25, 2006


Right this minute on NPR I'm listening to how there wasn't much winter to speak of in North America....
posted by pax digita at 6:32 AM on March 25, 2006


The rising water means:

Chemical plants underwater
Some nuke plants underwater
Oil terminals under water

Other not-water compatible infrastructure


Oh, and a bunch of ppl will have to move.
posted by rough ashlar at 7:08 AM on March 25, 2006


how there wasn't much winter to speak of in North America

"Oh, just normal fluctuations in global tempertures," I'm sure they'll say.

Which is may be, but I doubt it. This time last year I had 5ft. snowbanks in my backyard (Maine). This year there hasn't been even an inch of accumulation since February. It's nuts.
posted by Civil_Disobedient at 7:19 AM on March 25, 2006


Wake me up when we get back to this point.

posted by jfuller at 7:29 AM on March 25, 2006


America's addicted to dry land. . .
posted by Danf at 7:29 AM on March 25, 2006


America's addicted to dry land. . .
posted by Danf at 7:29 AM PST on March 25 [!]


More human than american...
posted by rough ashlar at 7:55 AM on March 25, 2006


This is the answer I've been looking for.
posted by odinsdream at 8:00 AM on March 25, 2006


jfuller - interesting, I guess that explains the great plains.
posted by stbalbach at 8:00 AM on March 25, 2006


> Sea levels are on the rise.

We've been there, done that.

(N.b. where it says "drag mouse across image" it means left-click and hold and drag.)

Observe that the entire middle east is under water. I hold out hope for a peaceful future.

posted by jfuller at 8:21 AM on March 25, 2006


The San Francisco Chronicle had an interesting article on this yesterday, with a map showing the effects of a 20-foot rise in water level on San Francisco. Buh-bye Bay Bridge, looks like. (Most of downtown San Francisco is built on landfill, which is just dirt on top of wooden ships.)
posted by kirkaracha at 8:21 AM on March 25, 2006


So Miami doesn't sink but it becomes a peninsula. That is something I didn't expect. It will be sad to see the Everglades disappear.
posted by oddman at 8:44 AM on March 25, 2006


b1tr0t:

Actually, the Dutch are called upon regularly here in NJ/NY, because of all the landfills and other reclamation that's gone on in the past couple of centuries. I imagine that relationship will continue long after The Netherlands is safely ensconced in its domes under the rising North Sea.
posted by trigonometry at 8:50 AM on March 25, 2006 [1 favorite]


Hmmm - mixed blessing - at 10 meters my office near the Boston waterfront is gone, but my home in Brookline becomes an oceanfront villa.

I'll need some time to think about this....
posted by jalexei at 9:55 AM on March 25, 2006


A 7m rise does a nasty job on the peninsular state, but most of Jacksonville stays dry.

Just for curiosities sake... if things really get out of hand, say at a cataclysmic 14m... every city from Brownsville TX, all the way around to Charleston, SC.... is just gone.

Also at 14m... water will be lapping at the stairs in front of both the White House and the United States Capitol building.
posted by PROD_TPSL at 10:41 AM on March 25, 2006


If only you could go up to 16 or so meters. Then I'd live on an island!
posted by aubilenon at 10:59 AM on March 25, 2006


7m rise = (almost) all beaches will be gone
posted by CountOfStGermain at 12:42 PM on March 25, 2006


Observe that the entire middle east is under water. I hold out hope for a peaceful future.

Shallow water drilling and the rise of the marsh Arabs say no.
posted by rough ashlar at 12:43 PM on March 25, 2006


as a citizen of the state of Missouri, which is next to the great state state of Kansas, "as bigoted as you think it is", I perceive a very low level of vigilance on the global warming issue. I think the junk science pertetrated by the big oil companies has a lot to do with this. I mean, if you watched Fox news, you'd think global warming was a complete fiction.
posted by jmanning at 12:51 PM on March 25, 2006


The area I study (the fens in England) would be mostly flooded if the sea levels rose even one metre. Well, actually, they do have floods every so often (last was 1947) when storms and heavy rainfall overwhelm their drainage systems.

That said, this system is really useful for me to be able to pick out the relief of the area very vividly.
posted by jb at 3:59 PM on March 25, 2006


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