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Musik Kolleg Online
April 12, 2006 6:22 AM   Subscribe

Austria's AEIOU has bar-by-bar analyses of major classical works (of composers associated with Austria): audio, annotations, scores, and performance/score animations in various video formats, together with biographical essays on the composers. Some possible points of departure: 1, 2, 3.
posted by Wolfdog (10 comments total)

 
Their Austrian music history pages are a treasure trove, too.

(The pages are available in English; sorry if they don't come up that way on click-through, but there's a link at the top of the page to change language.)
posted by Wolfdog at 6:24 AM on April 12, 2006


I went straight to the Schoenberg section. It's a pity that they don't look at more pieces but at least they have some Arnie up there... I'll look at other things later. Thanks Wolfdog!
posted by ob at 7:43 AM on April 12, 2006


Neunundneunzig Luftballons
Auf ihrem Weg zum Horizont
Hielt Man für Ufos aus dem All
Darum schickte ein General !
posted by elpapacito at 7:55 AM on April 12, 2006


Great find!

The History of Music page leads to some very interesting material stretching back to a prehistoric bone flute and leading up to modern music.
posted by imposster at 7:59 AM on April 12, 2006


Oh, as you mentioned in your comment.
Here are the bone flute from the Gudenus Cave and the bone flute from Flavia Solva (200 AD). With audio and spectrograms! Yes!
posted by imposster at 8:03 AM on April 12, 2006


It's like being back in a college music course.
Some fun stuff here.
posted by caddis at 8:16 AM on April 12, 2006


Uh... not to play the predictable "how could they leave out this!?" card, but have these folks ever heard of a guy named Gustav Mahler? Those of us outside Austria might in fact consider him a little better known Austrian composer than, er, Karl Schiske.

Oh well. Other than that, it looks like a worthwhile site - but I was really hoping there would be something exhaustive on Mahler's Symphony No. 1 (his first and last truly great symphony).
posted by soyjoy at 8:26 AM on April 12, 2006


It's a pity that they don't look at more pieces
Well, at least the one they chose is an interesting mature example, rather than another rehash of Pierrot or Verklarte.

have these folks ever heard of a guy named Gustav Mahler?
Perhaps there's something coming; I imagine it's rather arduous to prepare these and even the smallest Mahler work would be a task.

his first and last truly great symphony
Well, that should warm up the conversation a bit.
posted by Wolfdog at 8:40 AM on April 12, 2006


Symphony No. 1? Enough blasphemy you cretin. Symphony No. 6 was his only truly great symphony. :)
posted by caddis at 9:08 AM on April 12, 2006


heh.
posted by soyjoy at 10:05 AM on April 12, 2006


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