Top 10 ad-tricks in Tokyo’s train stations
October 20, 2006 4:20 PM   Subscribe

Top 10 ad-tricks in Tokyo’s train stations
posted by Tlogmer (32 comments total) 4 users marked this as a favorite

 
Hmm, that tunnel movie trick was used by Snapple in the PATH train tunnel from Jersey to NYC not long ago. but it was an effect of the tunnel's supports, and didn't require any lights.
posted by mkb at 4:31 PM on October 20, 2006


The occasions when one company takes over an entire train's adverts is always noticeable -- high-impact.

My favorite was when for some reason the subway train had NO adverts at all. The different / more pleasant ambience was quite noticeable. The CCCP's trains didn't have ads AFAIK; there you go, I guess.
posted by Heywood Mogroot at 4:34 PM on October 20, 2006


I don't know how (some) of these are ad tricks... the first
one is a mural along a whole wall. meh
posted by mrnutty at 4:35 PM on October 20, 2006


Yes, I saw the tunnel movie at the 14th street PATH station too! It was for Snapple.
posted by clevershark at 4:35 PM on October 20, 2006


I love Ping...i did notice when i was there how many more ads they had everywhere (and just now in Germany, how few ads there were everywhere). They've started doing a cool thing here--wrapping an entire subway car inside as an ad
posted by amberglow at 4:38 PM on October 20, 2006


Anyone fancy a cold refreshing Snapple?
posted by cillit bang at 4:39 PM on October 20, 2006


Well it does go to show that the ad was effective, if I can remember it while I haven't ridden a PATH train nearly two and a half years :-)
posted by clevershark at 4:41 PM on October 20, 2006


So does this mean that Japanese people put Pringles in thier soup? Or is it just Pringles hoping that they will?
posted by nyxxxx at 4:45 PM on October 20, 2006


Suzumiya Haruhi is everywhere!
posted by Steven C. Den Beste at 4:48 PM on October 20, 2006


I never can understand why people would like advertising. Anything that vies for my attention just to beg for money is bad, with the exception of hobos.
posted by Citizen Premier at 4:57 PM on October 20, 2006


So does this mean that Japanese people put Pringles in thier soup?

They also put cheerios in their tea and wear tiny little shoes on the tip of each finger.
posted by PinkStainlessTail at 5:10 PM on October 20, 2006 [1 favorite]


I never can understand why people would like advertising.
When done well, it rivals other popular entertainment and sometimes even surpasses it. And it certainly beats people paying to actually be ads, like with logo'd clothing and stuff.
posted by amberglow at 5:23 PM on October 20, 2006


Citizen Premier writes "I never can understand why people would like advertising."

It's an art form. It can be beautiful and ingenious. You've gotta learn to separate form and function, man.
posted by mr_roboto at 5:40 PM on October 20, 2006


So does this mean that Japanese people put Pringles in thier soup? Or is it just Pringles hoping that they will?

It's from a campaign where they show the Pringles becoming different flavored after the chips eat things. I think that one was the French Consomme flavor.
posted by emmling at 5:55 PM on October 20, 2006


It would be neat to live in a culture where these wouldn't be immediately vandalized, stolen, or graffitied. (Not saying that Tokyo is that place, but at least the ads stayed clean and intact long enough to get the photos of them.)

I would probably be less bothered by the constant advertising that permeates my life if it had more style and elegance, like several of the pieces in the article.
posted by quin at 5:57 PM on October 20, 2006


i'm with citizen premier...i'm glad boston's subways don't look like tokyo's. i feel, at the very least, that an equal ammount of public space should be given to local artists and art schools.
posted by es_de_bah at 6:01 PM on October 20, 2006


es_de_bah - I fully favor the MBTA devoting as much space as possible to local artists and students, but seriously, any effort to impart even the slightest bit of Tokyo into Boston's dank, rusty, sooty, water-damaged, dark, crumbling, urine-smelling stations would be a welcome improvement.

"I never can understand why people would like advertising."

Overly brand-conscious and logo-emblazoned folks generally annoy me, but knee-jerk dismissal of advertising seems a bit harsh as well. If concrete columns turned into giant juice bottles don't tickle your fancy at least a little, it seems a bit sad.

I dunno, it may just be the brainwashing...
posted by jalexei at 6:30 PM on October 20, 2006


It's an art form. It can be beautiful and ingenious.

Rarely. I thought nine out of ten of those were things the world would be better off without. They do seem more appealing to me than they would if I could read Japanese.

But I liked the giant "Ucon-Tea" bottles.
posted by sfenders at 6:51 PM on October 20, 2006


i feel, at the very least, that an equal ammount of public space should be given to local artists and art schools.

The MBTA to the rescue!

T fares are going up. I would not mind more advertising if it helped allay the cost. Yes, my soul is for sale.
posted by Marit at 7:00 PM on October 20, 2006


I'm so tired of adverts with a middle aged man standing against a white background asking me if I'm having trouble sleeping or getting reception on my cell phone. I would prefer this to the dirty subway tunnels with bland adverts for hair loss meds and overpriced schools. I mean, adverts will be everywhere, you can't escape them, so why not try to make them interesting?
posted by Holy foxy moxie batman! at 9:00 PM on October 20, 2006


It would be neat to live in a culture where these wouldn't be immediately vandalized, stolen, or graffitied. (Not saying that Tokyo is that place, but at least the ads stayed clean and intact long enough to get the photos of them.)

We constantly marvel at that fact. Huge display windows without metal grates at night, advertising and other kinds of displays not brought in, and just... a lot of stuff. Potted plants, hanging decorations, you name it. Aside from the occasional bit of graffiti on walls, I never see vandalism in Japan. Anyone here in the dodgier bits of Tokyo or Osaka able to comment?
posted by dreamsign at 10:39 PM on October 20, 2006


It would be neat to live in a culture where these wouldn't be immediately vandalized, stolen, or graffitied. (Not saying that Tokyo is that place, but at least the ads stayed clean and intact long enough to get the photos of them.)

That was one of the things that hit me first. But I secretly love how people are constantly drawing and writing on ads in the New York subway stations. Sometimes it's just juvenile, like drawing mustaches on women and blacking out teeth (which evidently will never go out of style). But reading what people write on the ads is like being privy to a much bigger conversation, kind of like an old-school message board. I always find it fascinating.

Also, every time I see pictures of another subway system (or ride one), I am reminded of what horrific shape the New York City subway is in. The gap in upkeep between a 24-hour system and one that closes is immense. Also, Wikipedia says that there are three subway systems in the world with 24-hour service: NYC, the PATH train, and one more. Anyone know what it is?
posted by anjamu at 10:51 PM on October 20, 2006


anjamu : Anyone know what it is?

Well, without knowing what you were going for, I'm gonna guess the Chicago red train, which my friend who has to ride it regularly likes to call it: the murder train...
posted by quin at 11:30 PM on October 20, 2006


It would be neat to live in a culture where these wouldn't be immediately vandalized, stolen, or graffitied. (Not saying that Tokyo is that place...

I'll chime in with those others who've affirmed above that Tokyo is indeed that place. After 11 years here, I take it for granted, and it doesn't even sem that remarkable to me anymore, but there is really no vandalism, theft, grafitti etc. when it comes to ads, or in fact, to public places in general. The nice cusiony seats on trains, for example, are cloth-covered and free of rips, tears and even stains.

As to how "neat" it is, well, you know, there is a bit of a downside to living in such a hypersafe, tidy, ummm... edge-free city. It can seem kinda sterile sometimes, compared to NYC, London, etc. Still, the very, very low rate of crimes like robbery, theft and especially mugging is something that I really appreciate. It's relaxing. So if that means there's a lack of the kind of ad defacement that is funny or interesting, well, so be it. It's a trade-off.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 12:08 AM on October 21, 2006


Thanks anjamu, you reminded me how I enjoyed Berkeley's graffiti. The USA Today stands used to get "McPaper."
posted by toma at 3:30 AM on October 21, 2006


I saw some grime and graffiti in tokyo -- only in Ameyoko tho (i felt very at home there) : >
posted by amberglow at 5:02 AM on October 21, 2006


I have never seen a city so saturated with advertising like Tokyo. I can see why they have to go to such lengths to stand out. I recall little Asahi "Beer Water" cans on the train hang straps, pens being handed out and other stunts that would never fly in the US. But you have to wonder if they really work.
posted by tommasz at 5:48 AM on October 21, 2006


oversaturated, i thought, tommasz--it became automatic to glance (or listen, in the case of the people in front of stores shouting) and then immediately tune it out. I guess, tho, that if it didn't work, they wouldn't continue to do it. The subways there (and everywhere) are a perfect place--it's a captive audience.
posted by amberglow at 6:24 AM on October 21, 2006


I saw some grime and graffiti in tokyo -- only in Ameyoko tho (i felt very at home there)

Hey, I feel really at home there too: it's my neighborhood! About 5 minutes away by bicycle, I go there for Tokyo's best prices on cheese, coffee, chocolate, etc. Ameyoko rules!
posted by flapjax at midnite at 6:50 AM on October 21, 2006


The occasions when one company takes over an entire train's adverts is always noticeable -- high-impact.

Here in NYC it's the standard for anything with a budget behind it. You only see ads for more than one company on a single train with low budget stuff like Dr. Zizmor's dermatology practice and phone cards for immigrants. It loses the impact pretty quickly.

I too love that you can't put an ad up in NYC without it getting defaced. Especially a Fox News ad.
posted by TheOnlyCoolTim at 7:52 AM on October 21, 2006


It would be neat to live in a culture where these [the ads] wouldn't be immediately vandalized, stolen, or graffitied.

Yeah, poor ads. It would also be neat to live in a city where every inch of public space wasn't covered in advertisement.
posted by Termite at 8:51 AM on October 21, 2006


True, but given the choices "vandalism, theft, but few ads" and "ads, but little vandalism or theft", I'll pick the latter.
posted by Bugbread at 3:39 AM on October 22, 2006


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