Join 3,512 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


J is for Jihad, and K is for Kalashnikov, and I is for Infidel
November 14, 2006 5:04 PM   Subscribe

"I" is for "Infidel" "Associated Press and New Yorker [Q&A] writer Kathy Gannon delivers an intimately observed history of Afghanistan from 1986 to the present. The longest-serving Western journalist in the region, Gannon overturns simplistic understanding of the country's politics in this eye-opening talk." [more inside]
posted by kirkaracha (17 comments total) 8 users marked this as a favorite

 
Excerpt from her book, I is for Infidel. From a Boston Globe review:
One recurrent theme is an uncanny American habit of allying with Afghan leaders who brutalize their own people and later turn against the United States or nurture its future enemies.
...
Her title is drawn from an English primer printed in the United States for Afghan refugees who fled to Pakistan during the Soviet occupation. The book, Gannon writes, 'taught the alphabet by using such examples as: J is for Jihad, and K is for Kalashnikov, and I is for infidel."
posted by kirkaracha at 5:06 PM on November 14, 2006


Related: Pakistan Link Seen in Afghan Suicide Attacks:
"Every single bomber or I.E.D. in one way or another is linked to Pakistan," a senior Afghan intelligence official said, referring to improvised explosive devices like roadside bombs. "Their reasons are to keep Afghanistan destabilized, to make us fail, and to keep us fragmented."
posted by kirkaracha at 6:23 PM on November 14, 2006


"...wrong facts..."
posted by taosbat at 6:46 PM on November 14, 2006


Of all the screwing over my government is responsible for in the past century, it's the Cambodians and the Afghanis who have every right to shove pitchforks in our collective asses when we make it to hell.
posted by bardic at 7:39 PM on November 14, 2006


Fascinating. Looking at the history of Afghanistan, it seems that one of the requirements for having a real empire is to fuck over Afghanistan.
posted by spazzm at 7:58 PM on November 14, 2006


The Bush War on Afghan Drugs
posted by homunculus at 8:14 PM on November 14, 2006


spazzm, I think the Maya and the Vikings missed invading Afghanistan.
posted by QIbHom at 8:31 PM on November 14, 2006


the Maya and the Vikings missed invading Afghanistan

They were going to, but the Vikings got lost at Newfoundland and the Mayans called in sick.
posted by CynicalKnight at 8:40 PM on November 14, 2006


is anyone actually observing the lecture besides myself?
posted by j-urb at 9:01 PM on November 14, 2006


I listened to the whole thing, j-rub.
posted by taosbat at 9:06 PM on November 14, 2006


what's with the "...wrong facts..." ?

How so, taosbat?
posted by j-urb at 9:44 PM on November 14, 2006


the Maya and the Vikings missed invading Afghanistan

They were going to, but the Vikings got lost at Newfoundland and the Mayans called in sick.

posted by CynicalKnight at 8:40 PM PST on November 14



aaah but the afghans invaded India instead ...
posted by infini at 11:28 PM on November 14, 2006


jeff gannon is back?
posted by yonation at 6:12 AM on November 15, 2006


At about 7:48, she is talking about how our government got so much of what was/is happening in Afghanistan & Pakistan wrong using the example of the CIA mistaking just who it was that invited OBL to Afghanistan, and she says that our foreign policy was "...based on these facts, wrong facts..."

I keep seeing those "...wrong facts..." causing us trouble in all sorts of situations. I'm thinking our worst enemy is "...wrong facts..."
posted by taosbat at 6:40 AM on November 15, 2006


A good, informative talk—thanks for posting it.
posted by languagehat at 12:43 PM on November 15, 2006


tru dat, t.b.

yeah thanks for posting, kirk a. too bad more people cant take the time to check it out.
posted by j-urb at 6:55 PM on November 15, 2006


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Al Qaeda is reinvigorating its operations from havens on the Afghan-Pakistani border and poses a growing challenge to U.S. interests in both Iraq and Afghanistan, American intelligence officials said on Wednesday.

Five years after the September 11 attacks and the fall of Taliban rule in Afghanistan, the network led by Osama bin Laden has replaced leaders killed or captured by the United States and its allies with new seasoned militants.

"It has shown resilience," CIA Director Michael Hayden told the Senate Armed Services Committee.

"The loss of a series of Al Qaeda leaders since 9/11 has been substantial. But it's also been mitigated by what is, frankly, a pretty deep bench of low-ranking personnel capable of stepping up to assume leadership positions," Hayden said.

"These new leaders average over 40 years of age and two decades of involvement in global jihadism..."
posted by taosbat at 7:30 PM on November 15, 2006


« Older Ready for '08? Survey USA is....  |  The Alaska Pacific River Forec... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments