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December 14, 2006 6:38 PM   Subscribe

Riemann's Curve, Airfoils, Complex Roots, More.
posted by Kwantsar (19 comments total)

 
good shapes is math. . . but isn't bad shapes math too?
posted by isopraxis at 6:53 PM on December 14, 2006


Like something out of 1998.
posted by smackfu at 6:53 PM on December 14, 2006


You say that as if 2006 is better than 1998.
I'll admit that today's texture maps are better but that is simply the window dressing.

Is it wrong of me to love low-res visual representations of mathematical constructs and 1998 more than 2006?

If so, I'd like to hear about it.
posted by isopraxis at 7:10 PM on December 14, 2006


Metafilter: best of the gif

(flagged)
posted by b1tr0t at 7:13 PM on December 14, 2006


Oh, holy shit.

Why won't you leave me alone?
posted by carsonb at 7:29 PM on December 14, 2006


Also, to offer a contrary opinion, I'm really enjoying the graphic selection. Though I can't make heads or tails of why these images are, they strike a chord directly on my aesthetic sense and I enjoy them. Many will feature prominently on future mix CDs, to be sure.
posted by carsonb at 7:36 PM on December 14, 2006


Just so everyone knows, these are from the website of Curt McMullen, a math professor at Harvard. In 1998, since we're talking about that year anyway, he won the Fields Medal. Among his many strong former students are Jeffrey Brock, a professor at Brown with some cool movies of his own, and Maryam Mirzakhani, an assistant professor at Princeton.
posted by escabeche at 7:49 PM on December 14, 2006 [1 favorite]


Jerk off material for math majors
posted by Mach5 at 7:50 PM on December 14, 2006


Cascade of bifurcations, or Nefertiti's do. I lurve those.
posted by carmina at 7:52 PM on December 14, 2006


Like something out of 1998.

[snark]
I was going to say more like the Web circa 1996. Or earlier, for those of us who spent their college years studying airflows and control algorithms (complex roots) in pursuit of useless aerospace engineering degrees and had all this visualized in their heads. Watch the poles and zeros move around ...
[/snark]

[wonder]
My god, carsonb, it's full of stars! Wow.
[/wonder]
posted by intermod at 8:23 PM on December 14, 2006


Neat. A computer can draw mathematical functions. If a human drew it I'd be much more impressed. However, I like the images so I give it a thumbs up anyway.
posted by markulus at 8:43 PM on December 14, 2006


I went looking for an actual image gallery from the 90's but I found something so much better.
posted by smackfu at 8:52 PM on December 14, 2006


I'll confess that I love shit like this. Are we getting into fractals?
posted by bobobox at 9:06 PM on December 14, 2006


Beautiful stuff, cheers.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 9:37 PM on December 14, 2006


Hmmm fractals

posted by wtfchuck at 10:39 PM on December 14, 2006


You call it math. I call it 2C-T-7.
posted by tehloki at 11:58 PM on December 14, 2006


thank you
posted by dminor at 12:09 AM on December 15, 2006


I went looking for an actual image gallery from the 90's but I found something so much better.

Like something out of 1968. Groovy.

I started writing computer graphics programs in 1981 or so. All of a sudden, I learned the answer to the "when will I ever use this?" question about math.
posted by Enron Hubbard at 4:31 AM on December 15, 2006


If a human drew it I'd be much more impressed.

Back when they used slide rules at places like Boeing and Republic-Fairchild, they'd plot points and draw curves on the floors of airplane factories -- because concrete deforms less with humidity, temperature and handling than paper does -- and use those drawings as a basis to fabricate the jigs and forms for manufacturing the airfoil parts. Just another example of computers taking all the romance out of aerospace engineering, I guess.
posted by pax digita at 7:11 AM on December 15, 2006


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