Join 3,524 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


Imagined there was a heaven / But only for a while...
January 4, 2007 10:07 AM   Subscribe

...He expressed regret that he had said that the Beatles were more popular than Jesus and enclosed a gift for the Oral Roberts University. After quoting the line "money can't buy me love" from "Can't Buy Me Love" he said, "It's true. The point is this, I want happiness. I don't want to keep on with drugs. Paul told me once, 'You made fun of me for taking drugs, but you will regret it in the end.' Explain to me what Christianity can do for me. Is it phoney? Can He love me? I want out of hell."
John Lennon's Born-Again Phase
posted by y2karl (79 comments total) 3 users marked this as a favorite

 
Reaffirms the advice my mother gave me: "they'll always try and get you when you are low."
posted by Acey at 10:10 AM on January 4, 2007


A television addict for many years (it was his way of looking at the world since he could no longer walk around anonymously), he enjoyed watching some of America's best-known evangelists—Pat Robertson, Billy Graham, Jim Bakker, and Oral Roberts. In 1972 he had written a desperate letter to Roberts confessing his dependence on drugs

the combo of drugs and televangelists is a dangerous one. If you're stoned and/or paranoid, those sermons can freak you right the hell out.
posted by jonmc at 10:13 AM on January 4, 2007


the combo of drugs and televangelists is a dangerous one. If you're stoned and/or paranoid, those sermons can freak you right the hell out.

That and sitting downwind from Elephant's Memory.
posted by hal9k at 10:18 AM on January 4, 2007


Well, jeez, the combo of drugs and television is a dangerous one. If you're stoned and/or paranoid, those commercials can freak you right the hell out.

Not to mention Oprah.
posted by y2karl at 10:18 AM on January 4, 2007


Eh, watching commercials stoned just makes me hungry. Same with Oprah, come to think of it.
posted by jonmc at 10:19 AM on January 4, 2007


Simply owning and operating a functioning brain and being generally near a television can freak you right the hell out.

Besides, who needs TV if you have good drugs?
posted by loquacious at 10:25 AM on January 4, 2007


Cancer, depression, heart disease and erectile dysfunction medication ads make you hungry ?
posted by y2karl at 10:25 AM on January 4, 2007


Interesting article, thanks... I think it's strange that it's on the website of Christianity Today: A Magazine Of Evangelical Conviction, since it definitely reveals things that don't put evangelical christianity in a good light.
posted by amyms at 10:27 AM on January 4, 2007


Television is a drug. A drug that often inspires to bestow Oral gifts.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 10:28 AM on January 4, 2007


Cancer, depression, heart disease and erectile dysfunction medication ads make you hungry ?

No, but fast food, cereal, and restaurant ones do. The rest slide right past me unless there's hot, scantily clad women in them.
posted by jonmc at 10:30 AM on January 4, 2007


In January 1979 he and Yoko traveled to Cairo, having heard that there was a major illicit archaeological dig taking place. Both of them believed that ancient Egyptian artifacts contained magical powers, and Yoko had dedicated one of the rooms in their apartment to Egyptian artifacts. "I love Egyptian art," she said. "I make sure I get all the Egyptian things, not for their value but for their magic power. Each piece has a certain magic power." They stayed at the Nile Hilton and toured the pyramids, but when word got out about their intentions they were prevented from visiting the dig.

So. Let me get this straight. They sought to buy STOLEN (illicit dig) priceless cultural artifacts that should rightfully belong to the people of Egypt because they thought they were magic. MAGIC?

What a pair of fucking creepy narcissistic assholes. Not to mention stupid.

Lennon may have been a musical genius but he was an asshole. I bet Yoko STILL collects "magic" artifacts.
posted by tkchrist at 10:30 AM on January 4, 2007 [1 favorite]


Fuckin' acid, man.
posted by The Straightener at 10:30 AM on January 4, 2007


Interesting link y2karl.

I had never heard of this before, even though I have been pretty in-tune with what I call "Christian counterculture" for many years. (Even interned at Jim Bakker's PTL.)

What is most fascinating is that Oral Roberts didn't try to cash in on this at the time. (Or did he? I didn't hear of it.) It's always been a competition among the televangelists as to who can bag the biggest mainstream celeb as "their convert."

Too bad he chose the televangelists for his serious questions about Christianity. In fact, Oral Roberts Miracle of Seed Faith book focuses mostly on his doctrine concerning finances: "give and it shall be given" etc., and not on the overall teachings of Jesus.

In any event, thanks y2karl, for an interesting article.
posted by The Deej at 10:32 AM on January 4, 2007


I think most people will never realize how truly isolating fame can be.
posted by ninjew at 10:38 AM on January 4, 2007


We used to call them "Jesus Freaks."
posted by tkchrist at 10:39 AM on January 4, 2007


"If he became a follower of Jesus he would no longer depend on her and the occultists. "

Yeah, because there's no way he would come to realize what a load of shit it is without that evil oriental woman controlling him.

"They sought to buy STOLEN (illicit dig) priceless cultural artifacts"

While I wouldn't put it past them, I also wouldn't mistake christian propaganda for journalism. Any other sources for this besides known liars and proselytizers?
posted by 2sheets at 10:42 AM on January 4, 2007


It's always been a competition among the televangelists as to who can bag the biggest mainstream celeb as "their convert."

Didn't Robertson claim to have 'saved' David Berkowitz and Susan Atkins?

I'd say he wins.
posted by jonmc at 10:43 AM on January 4, 2007


...and proselytizers?

They make condoms as well?
posted by tkchrist at 10:45 AM on January 4, 2007


An interesting read and a good excuse to put Slow Train Coming on the ol' turn table, thanks y2karl!
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 10:48 AM on January 4, 2007


jonmc:No, but fast food, cereal, and restaurant ones do. The rest slide right past me unless there's hot, scantily clad women in them.

Slide right past me. That's so cute.

"No, ads don't affect me at all. But the store-brand stuff tastes BAAAD!"
posted by hexatron at 10:55 AM on January 4, 2007


y2karl -- You hit paydirt here. The episode is alluded to in the Goldman biography. If the whole thing doesn't give you a funny feeling in the pit of your stomach, you're not paying attention.
posted by Faze at 11:08 AM on January 4, 2007


Great find. I had heard that he went through a Christian "phase" but I had no details until now. I need to check out that Dylan album too - I have never listened to it. Does he still consider himself a Christian?
posted by internal at 11:13 AM on January 4, 2007


What I've gotten from reading a couple different Dylan biographies, as well as his semi-cryptic autobiography, is that Dylan writes whatever the hell he thinks people want to buy that week, for the purpose of selling albums. He must have detected some sort of demographic uptick in the evangelical market at that point. He's an opportunistic cynic who disowns anyone who reads any significance into any of his lyrics, and disowns his own part in any movement that attaches itself to his words. It's really a damn shame, because he's one of the 20th century's greatest wordsmiths, but it turns out he's really sort of a garden-variety jerk.
posted by Devils Rancher at 11:21 AM on January 4, 2007 [4 favorites]


Couldn't have said it better myself Devils Rancher. Thanks.
posted by Eekacat at 11:26 AM on January 4, 2007


Paul told me once, 'You made fun of me for taking drugs, but you will regret it in the end.'

He was right about this. There are so many, many reasons to make fun of Paul, shame to focus on just the drug use. Although there's definitely some fertile ground there.
posted by stupidsexyFlanders at 11:26 AM on January 4, 2007


but it turns out he's really sort of a garden-variety jerk.

you're wrong. he's an extraordinary jerk, god bless him.
posted by jonmc at 11:28 AM on January 4, 2007


jonmc, Berkowitz credits his conversion to another inmate's friendship. But on the website, it looks like James Dobson's Focus on the Family group is pretty involved with him. He has also appeared on numerous other Christian television shows.

Susan Atkins bio on IMDB: "In 1974, Atkins had a falling out with Manson and the clan that still clung to him after she began corresponding with born-again Christian Bruce Davis, a clan member who had rejected Manson & Co. for mainstream salvation."

So, it looks like they don't credit any of the professional Christians with their conversion, but amateurs.

Of course, this has never stopped the pros from making claims and taking credit.

Oh, and Dylan's "Christian era" music is great, whether you care for his message or not. Slow Train Coming, Saved, and Shot of Love are the albums that come to mind right away.
posted by The Deej at 11:29 AM on January 4, 2007


He must have detected some sort of demographic uptick in the evangelical market at that point.

Way wrong. Dylan went into heart first. His commitment was real, and transcripts of his evangelical exhortations to audiences at that period are some of the most un-masked statements he's ever made. The point is that these men are lonely narcissists, surrounded by sycophantic airheads, and -- like most of us -- completely unprepared for that moment when the ground of everyday life gives way and they find themselves stepping into the existential abyss. It's a long way down, and a long way back and fame, riches and friends are no protection. Prepare yourselves. If that's possible.
posted by Faze at 11:32 AM on January 4, 2007 [2 favorites]


Of course, this has never stopped the pros from making claims and taking credit.

I can only imagine Robertson taking credit for Berkowitz: "We Saved Him. A serial killer, and a Jew, as well!"
posted by jonmc at 11:33 AM on January 4, 2007


Great post—I didn't know about this either. Thanks, y2karl.
posted by languagehat at 11:34 AM on January 4, 2007


you're wrong. he's an extraordinary jerk, god bless him.

He's extraordinary in some ways, but I think there's too many serious jerks in the world for us to consider his jerkiness itself to be of the extraordinary type. Joan Baez may disagree.

Deej, I would never hate on his music. I like just about all of it. This causes me cognitive dissonance, though.
posted by Devils Rancher at 11:35 AM on January 4, 2007


He's extraordinary in some ways, but I think there's too many serious jerks in the world for us to consider his jerkiness itself to be of the extraordinary type.

His jerkiness is directly bound up with his genius. "Like A Rolling Stone" "Positively 4th Street" and "Ballad Of A Thin Man" (just to name a few) are not the songs of a 'nice guy.' An thankfully so.
posted by jonmc at 11:39 AM on January 4, 2007


He's an opportunistic cynic who disowns anyone who reads any significance into any of his lyrics, and disowns his own part in any movement that attaches itself to his words.

If your take on Dylan's creative process is accurate, to relate this way to your audience is really the most responsible and respectful reaction possible, no?

But I think your description says more about your cynicism than Dylan's. He's an artist who expresses what's on his mind at any given time, and probably weighs the "demographic" impact of his work less than most. I've heard a lot of criticism of his "born-again" phase, but the charge that it was a ploy to sell records is a new one on me.
posted by stupidsexyFlanders at 11:41 AM on January 4, 2007


Dylan's first Christian album was the first tape I ever bought as a new believer (I actually thought that when I got saved that all I would be able to listen to was gospel quartets. I was relieved to be wrong about that.)

I am really stunned about Lennon. I never would have guessed.

BTW Oral Roberts has an interesting early life story. Among other things, when he was a little boy his brother nailed his hand to a tree stump.
posted by konolia at 11:44 AM on January 4, 2007


D.R., it sure caused me cognative dissonance at the time. I was completely engulfed in all things "christian." Not even listening to any "worldly" music at that time. So whent the "Dylan is a believer" news hit, I really didn't believe it. There were always claims and rumors of famous people "being Christians." This was in the latter part of the Jesus Freak era, 1978-80. So when I bought Slow Train Coming it took me a while to think it was genuine. I thought it was a marketing ploy, but Dylan had never been too concerned with market before.

Slow Train is pretty much classic Dylan, but with a somewhat stronger beat. Saved incorporates a much more gospel sound including gospel backup singers, and some of the most expressive and passionate singing I have ever heard from Dylan.
posted by The Deej at 11:45 AM on January 4, 2007


Among other things, when he was a little boy his brother nailed his hand to a tree stump.

Overenthusiastic Crucifixion Re-enactment?
posted by jonmc at 11:50 AM on January 4, 2007


Dylan has always been willfully obtuse. And what popular entertainer is not opportunistic to one degree or another? But his music has always had a religious/moral undercurrent. Slow Train Coming, Saved, and Shot of Love were more direct and, probably, more commercial - but not essentially different than his music before or since.

And, internal : check out the albums, they're great. You may even recognize the band - it's essentially Dire Straits.
posted by Benny Andajetz at 11:51 AM on January 4, 2007


Among other things, when he was a little boy his brother nailed his hand to a tree stump.

His brother had the good sense to do that? OK, then what dumbass let him loose? Sheesh.

And Benny, I had not realized that the band was the core of Dire Straits. Thanks for the info; interesting!
posted by The Deej at 12:13 PM on January 4, 2007


We used to call them "Jesus Freaks."

Thanks, tkchrist, now I have Elton John's "Tiny Dancer" stuck in my head... lol...

Jesus freaks out in the street
Handing tickets out for God
posted by amyms at 12:27 PM on January 4, 2007


Dylan's superpower was making terrible pop music and convincing people it wasn't pop or terrible.

FOLK music people. Jesus strumming a jew's harp. Weird Al's song "Bob" should be required listening for every Dylan fan.

And all this news about Lennon does is make me loose some (more) respect for him.
posted by Ynoxas at 12:29 PM on January 4, 2007


Dylan writes whatever the hell he thinks people want to buy that week, for the purpose of selling albums. He must have detected some sort of demographic uptick in the evangelical market at that point.

74 marks Dylan's return to the big stage. He has a number one album (Planet Waves) and a huge tour. 75 is Blood on the Tracks and his record company releases The Basement Tapes because Dylan is so hot at the time. 76 is Desire -- another number one album. He does the Rolling Thunder Review that year. He is on top of the world. He just had his first two number one albums. He just had two big tours.

His next studio album begins his run of four Christian albums ("Street Legal" is sort of the first). He tours and only does the new Christian songs. He has gospel singers on stage. He destroys everything that he has built up fame-wise and money-wise.

And you say he did it for the money?

Oh, this would be a good time to link to the song in which Lennon attacks Dylan for going Christian.
posted by flarbuse at 12:36 PM on January 4, 2007 [1 favorite]


"...and no religion too"
posted by matteo at 12:42 PM on January 4, 2007


Didn't know about this. Thanks y2karl. I figure it was freethinking, lonely, existentially questing Lennon trying out different paths.

"The Religious Affiliation of the 100 Greatest Rock Musicians"
posted by nickyskye at 12:43 PM on January 4, 2007


...the song in which Lennon attacks Dylan for going Christian.

"You got to serve yourself
Ain't nobody gonna do for you"

Sounds like Lennon was mocking Dylan's Serve Somebody:

"It may be the devil,
Or it may be the Lord,
But you're gonna have to serve somebody."

Good find flarbuse, thanks!
posted by The Deej at 12:45 PM on January 4, 2007


FOLK music people

there's no such thing as folk music. there's no such thing as folks, even.
posted by jonmc at 12:49 PM on January 4, 2007 [1 favorite]


My thinking about Dylan was an abstraction based on the way he treated his folk following with such disdain. He flat-out told people (paraphrase) "I just wrote that stuff because it was what I needed to write to be able to make albums." By about 66, he'd disowned all his early work, then shredded its adherents on subsequent albums. It seemed baffling at the time, but according to him he'd been following the almighty dollar. Why should his Christian period have been much different? (not like I really know what lurks in that enigmatic heart) I'll stop there, because I'm probably talking out of my ass. Think I'll go listen to Blonde on Blonde. Or maybe Plastic Ono.
posted by Devils Rancher at 12:52 PM on January 4, 2007


My thinking about Dylan was an abstraction based on the way he treated his folk following with such disdain.

well, judging by the way they acted when went electric, they had it coming.
posted by jonmc at 1:02 PM on January 4, 2007


What is most fascinating is that Oral Roberts didn't try to cash in on this at the time. (Or did he? I didn't hear of it.) It's always been a competition among the televangelists as to who can bag the biggest mainstream celeb as "their convert."

Too busy trying to build City of Faith, which rapidly turned into an albatross around the neck of ORU (and the denouement that was the "God will call me home" speech). As the Tulsa Tribune pointed out at the time, the area already had five hospitals that were never at capacity; why build something that ginormous when there was zero local demand?

My grandfather was big into Oral Roberts at the time. After going to a revival/fundraiser where people were pledging elevators and doors and other things, he walked away disavowing organized religion.

I think people forget how big the "Born Again" thing was in the late 70s. Everyone (ok, not everyone, but a lot of people) wanted to be in on the Oral Roberts-Jim Bakker "name it and claim it" movement, as well as Jerry Falwell's "Moral Majority." We elected our first "Born Again" president in Jimmy Carter. And it was bleeding over into other parts of Christianity and into other faiths as well. It surprises me that Lennon wrote to Oral and Pat, but at the same time it doesn't surprise me.

And on my namesake, Slow Train Coming is a great album, and has been upheld has a milestone in what we now call Contemporary Christian Music. Hell, my second grade Sunday school teacher looked like Bob Dylan, with the hair and the leather jacket. It was that influential.

But Saved and the other two Christian albums were crap. As was most of what Dylan did in the 80s.

Any other sources for this besides known liars and proselytizers?

Oh 2sheets and your lovable hating-on. I've met some of the CT writers and editors, and they're good journalists with their particular biases. Like the folks at The Nation and New Republic have theirs.
posted by dw at 1:04 PM on January 4, 2007


cool post. i can't remember where i read this, but supposedly around '67 he had a brief period during his acid phase where he announced to the other beatles that he was Christ reincarnate. anybody else recall seeing that?
posted by aquanaut at 1:11 PM on January 4, 2007


As the Tulsa Tribune pointed out at the time, the area already had five hospitals that were never at capacity; why build something that ginormous when there was zero local demand?

That is true! A relative of mine worked there as a nurse, and he said it was mostly empty beds and hallways. Oh wait! That's cuz they were all healed!!!!!
posted by The Deej at 1:20 PM on January 4, 2007


Am I the only one still skeptical about the veracity of this? I don't see references or how, otherwise, the author would know these things. This being an excerpt from The Gospel According to the Beatles does not soothe my worries.
posted by jmhodges at 1:36 PM on January 4, 2007


The "bigger than Jesus" article and fallout. John comes across as cheeky, spoiled by his new wealth, and likely toying with the journalist.

Alan Watts podcasts.

I had heard about Dylan's born-again phase for a long time, and the song title "Gotta Serve Somebody" sounded hilarious to me. It was really disappointing to finally hear the song, and find out that the stress was on "serve" rather than "somebody."

Good post, y2k, thanks.
posted by ibmcginty at 1:54 PM on January 4, 2007


My thinking about Dylan was an abstraction based on the way he treated his folk following with such disdain.

>well, judging by the way they acted when went electric, they had it coming.
posted by jonmc


But dude, they knew him, he was theirs!
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 1:54 PM on January 4, 2007


On a tangent here, in regards to the disdain with which the big treat the little, one anecdote reported about Gerald Ford this week was that, while he was President, he walked his own dog on and picked up his own dog's poop off the White House lawn. That's the way he had always done it and he refused to let, let alone make, anyone else walk his dog or scoop it's poop just because he'd become President. What a guy. There's a true man of the people.
posted by y2karl at 1:54 PM on January 4, 2007


Interesting article, thanks... I think it's strange that it's on the website of Christianity Today: A Magazine Of Evangelical Conviction, since it definitely reveals things that don't put evangelical christianity in a good light.
posted by amyms


I am no fan of the magazine, but I have read it from time to time. It is surprisingly critical of a lot of things that don't put Christianity in a good light, although I do think they to not make too many enemies.
posted by The Deej at 1:56 PM on January 4, 2007


jmhodges

See above.
posted by The Deej at 1:59 PM on January 4, 2007


aquanaut: I wouldn't be surprised. Acid is good for helping people realize that :)
posted by jtron at 2:15 PM on January 4, 2007


Oh, and the article wasn't written by a CT writer; it's an excerpt from this book by Steve Turner, who also wrote the authorized Johnny Cash biography and I believe something else about Clapton that I can't find on Amazon right now but remember it as a pretty good book of interviews with EC.
posted by dw at 2:17 PM on January 4, 2007


I'm bigger than Jesus, too. He was pretty short. And thin.
posted by It's Raining Florence Henderson at 2:23 PM on January 4, 2007


No, I can't be bothered to read every single goddam reply to this post to see if someone has already said what I would say in a heartbeat: This FPP is another proof that some drugs can, temporarily, at least, make you stupid enough to believe anything that might get you off of those drugs. Pftoof!
posted by sighmoan at 2:53 PM on January 4, 2007


I think it's strange that it's on the website of Christianity Today: A Magazine Of Evangelical Conviction, since it definitely reveals things that don't put evangelical christianity in a good light.
posted by amyms at 12:27 PM CST on January 4


Well, sure. We're not all out to get you. Truth is a Good ThingTM.
I'm not all that familiar with John Lennon, but this was an interesting read. Thanks for the link.
posted by niles at 2:55 PM on January 4, 2007


"fame, riches and friends are no protection"

Still they've got to be better than obscurity, poverty and loneliness.

Would you rather be an unhappy rich person or an unhappy poor one? Those who prefer the latter, well, I'll gladly accept your money; it might not make happier either but at least I'll look spiffy while I suffer.

In closing, the Beatles and Bob Dylan were over-rated media whores. To hell with 'em.
posted by davy at 3:07 PM on January 4, 2007


one anecdote reported about Gerald Ford this week was that, while he was President, he walked his own dog on and picked up his own dog's poop...

But... would he pick up John Lennon's poop? I bet not.
posted by tkchrist at 3:31 PM on January 4, 2007


Well, sure. We're not all out to get you.

Niles: I'm not sure who the "we" and "you" are in that sentence... I was just making the observation that it was funny to see an article critical of christianity under the auspices of a site called Christianity Today, not taking "sides."

(in small print so as not to derail what it otherwise a very interesting thread, especially all the rock history observations ~ thumbs up)
posted by amyms at 4:42 PM on January 4, 2007


Taking the "whispering font" cue from amyms.

The Wittenburg Door is a Christian mag that regularly beats up on mainstream Christianity.

posted by The Deej at 5:09 PM on January 4, 2007


I was just making the observation that it was funny to see an article critical of christianity under the auspices of a site called Christianity Today, not taking "sides."

I can understand that, but while CT has its share of cheerleader writing (and Chuck Colson still writing back-page political hack grumpy old man screeds), it's also the closest thing Evangelical Christianity has to a Newsmagazine Of RecordTM. They're willing to be critical and talk about the problems. It's pretty much what Billy Graham had in mind when he established the magazine 50+ years ago.

Personally, I like First Things more, but it's a journal rather than a magazine, so apples:oranges.

(Disclosure: The wife unit wrote a piece for one of CT's magazine years ago.)
posted by dw at 5:18 PM on January 4, 2007


Thanks, The Deej and dw, for answering my curiosity about christian magazines that don't necessarily fall into lockstep and toe the party line (mixed metaphor, I know). Very interesting.
posted by amyms at 5:24 PM on January 4, 2007


Btw, not that it matters, but I'm an atheist-leaning agnostic, but I really enjoy reading religious publications (mostly to see which ones are rabidly dangerous)... I'm always on the lookout for something new and interesting to read.
posted by amyms at 5:28 PM on January 4, 2007


The Wittenburg Door
Best. Religious magazine. Ever. It's Colbert-era This Week In God in print form.

posted by dw at 5:42 PM on January 4, 2007


I'm always on the lookout for something new and interesting to read.

CT being the House Organ of the Evangelical Church, it will give you a lot of insight into how us scary Evangelicals think.

Christian Century is the voice of the mainline-to-liberal church. Fewer personality pieces, more think pieces. Also the home of the best Christian blogger today.

Sojourners falls between CT and CC. I consider it religiously conservative, politically liberal. So, in a sense, it's the right side of the Religious Left.

First Things is scholarly and a look into the Catholic mind. Serve with a tawny port or merlot.

National Catholic Reporter is probably the closest you'll get to an independent voice of the Catholic Church in America. It's more newsy (and ballsy).

Wittenburg Door is what it is. It ranges from profane to sublime to insightful to hilarious, usually all at once.

And there's your tour of Christian magazines you never asked for.

posted by dw at 5:57 PM on January 4, 2007 [1 favorite]


Btw, not that it matters, but I'm an atheist-leaning agnostic...

And I am an athiest-leaning Christian! :)

This from my Wittenburg link Cracks me up:

Christian Video Games Explo 2007
Trick neighbors into circumcision and then kill them.

(Ya... I was brave and went for the unsmall font.)
posted by The Deej at 6:21 PM on January 4, 2007


Poor Yoko, not even the Christians forgive her for marrying John Lennon. They made a saint out of Mary Magdalene, you know.
posted by Kattullus at 6:22 PM on January 4, 2007


Yoko is definitely odd. But the story I always remember (maybe inaccurately) is Lennon describing going to one of her art exhibits soon after meeting her.

In one room was a ladder. He climbed up the ladder, and there was a magnifying glass, and a word written very small on the ceiling. He used the magnifying glass to read the word in this awkward position. It just said "Yes."

I love that.
posted by The Deej at 6:27 PM on January 4, 2007


amyms: eh, I had a much longer response, but it was too off-topic. It was just a long way of saying I should have thrown a :) in there somewhere.

posted by niles at 6:44 PM on January 4, 2007


One of my favorite John Lennon quotes, related to religion, is this:

"Well, you make your own dream. That's the Beatles' story, isn't it? That's Yoko's story . That's what I'm saying now. Produce your own dream. If you want to save Peru, go save Peru. It's quite possible to do anything, but not to put it on the leaders and the parking meters. Don't expect Jimmy Carter or Ronald Reagan or John Lennon or Yoko Ono or Bob Dylan or Jesus Christ to come and do it for you. You have to do it yourself. That's what the great masters and mistresses have been saying ever since time began. They can point the way, leave signposts and little instructions in various books that are now called holy and worshipped for the cover of the book and not for what it says, but the instructions are all there for all to see, have always been and always will be. There's nothing new under the sun. All the roads lead to Rome. And people cannot provide it for you. I can't wake you up. You can wake you up. I can't cure you. You can cure you."

I had heard it, and read it, many places before, but I didn't want to post it without being able to cite a source, and I finally found where it's from, a 1980 Playboy interview.

P.S. Thanks again, The Deej and dw, for the reading recommendations. Just don't show up at my doorstep with any magazines. ;) lol
posted by amyms at 6:59 PM on January 4, 2007


You're welcome amy. Don't worry, I don't even my door for religious nuts with literature either! :)
posted by The Deej at 8:49 PM on January 4, 2007


^^^"open my door"^^^ (blush)
posted by The Deej at 9:04 PM on January 4, 2007


Slavery was banned. We do not own artists. They get to be humans and do all the stupid things that other humans do: marry women we don't approve of, turn all religious-like for periods or time ... or forever, etc. Lennon seemed happy with Yoko. That's good enough for me. I don't give a crap if she is a flake or not. If she conspired to steal antiquities, that's a matter for the police. If she broke up the Beatles, let them sort all that out amongst themselves. If Picasso abused the women in his life, that's a matter for his soul and not his art. And to all of you who are so disappointed by Dylan, damn! You expect too much of others. Do you hold yourself to the same standards?
posted by a_day_late at 7:48 AM on January 5, 2007


Yes.
posted by matteo at 9:57 AM on January 6, 2007


« Older Dr Alice Gorman...  |  Christmas card delivered witho... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments