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APOD
February 5, 2007 6:59 AM   Subscribe

Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day is simply amazing.
posted by ztdavis (45 comments total) 18 users marked this as a favorite

 
I was thinking, what are the chances of those happening all at the same time and someone taking a picture right then.

I then saw that it was a stiched panorama. Still... prodigious!
posted by phrontist at 7:04 AM on February 5, 2007


And tomorrow has the promise of an exploding sun...
posted by Burhanistan at 7:05 AM on February 5, 2007


Fantastic.

I, too, await the exploding sun.
posted by defenestration at 7:09 AM on February 5, 2007


I'd rather see Jupiter ignite. I've kind of grown used to having Solaris around.
posted by Balisong at 7:12 AM on February 5, 2007


That is an incredible photo - but seeing how it's a composite shot, couldn't someone have done some photoshopping of the people rather than just superimposing the versions on top of each other?

It's beautiful, but it could have been so much more...
posted by twine42 at 7:15 AM on February 5, 2007


Clearly an ad for Adidas. Look at those three guys in the central foreground.

This photo is amazing. I love it. Thanks for posting it, ztdavis.
posted by Milkman Dan at 7:19 AM on February 5, 2007


Cool!...





Dugg!
posted by chillmost at 7:20 AM on February 5, 2007


I was getting all het up, about to let loose a volley of choice perjoratives and vulgarities at he unmitigated audacity of the poster in their choice to post a one-link fpp to a commonly-known resource.

And then I clicked the link. Beautiful.

Good Show, ztdavis, Good Show.
posted by exlotuseater at 7:22 AM on February 5, 2007


I was getting all het up, about to let loose a volley of choice perjoratives and vulgarities at he unmitigated audacity of the poster in their choice to post a one-link fpp to a commonly-known resource.

Yeah, it's worth it even if APOD has been a post here a dozen times, even if it is a composite shot. It's nice work, and an amazing view of our extremely dynamic planet and cosmos.
posted by loquacious at 7:29 AM on February 5, 2007


And frankly I almost posted it myself, but I figured it would make it here soon enough, and I could continue trolling for rarer fruit.
posted by loquacious at 7:30 AM on February 5, 2007


I'd rather see Jupiter ignite.

IT'S SHRINKING!!! IT'S SHRINKING!!!!

I still think 2010 was a cooler movie than 2001. But then I wasn't on acid when I saw 2001.
posted by WolfDaddy at 7:32 AM on February 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


That is an incredible photo - but seeing how it's a composite shot, couldn't someone have done some photoshopping of the people rather than just superimposing the versions on top of each other?

It's beautiful, but it could have been so much more...


I don't understand this comment. I ask because it must be something my less-than-expert eyes don't see. The only problem with the people I see is due to their motion while the shutter is open. I can't find any stitching lines or anything. Just looking for clarification.
posted by Phantomx at 7:36 AM on February 5, 2007


Ah, Lucifer in the Sky with Diamonds, how doth thy diamondoid gravity-well dwell?
posted by loquacious at 7:37 AM on February 5, 2007


couldn't someone have done some photoshopping of the people rather than just superimposing the versions on top of each other?

Shots of lightning (and fireworks, for that matter) are usually 15 to 30 second exposures. While I'm sure that some of the crowd's blurriness is stitching things together, most of it comes from movement over the course of the exposure. Particularly blurry things, like people moving, barely show up and give you the feeling of things being superimposed.

(blatant self link to illustrate point: Here's a 90 minute exposure for an example of what I'm talking about.)
posted by ztdavis at 7:39 AM on February 5, 2007


If you look really closely, there is a volcano erupting in the background, and Mothra is rising from the sea.
posted by Astro Zombie at 7:40 AM on February 5, 2007


For some reason I immediately thought of Bad Day on the High Sea.

Great picture. Thanks, ztdavis.

I need to visit that page more often. Like, every day.
posted by cog_nate at 7:40 AM on February 5, 2007


The Universe is pure beauty ... sometimes ...
posted by homodigitalis at 7:42 AM on February 5, 2007


I need to visit that page more often. Like, every day.

Its my homepage on every browser. It's non-commercial. It has a beautiful photo every day. It also usually has some interesting facts about our Universe. Really, what more could you ask for?
posted by vacapinta at 7:47 AM on February 5, 2007


Its looks really processed, like an HDR photo.
posted by damn dirty ape at 7:49 AM on February 5, 2007


Also, anyone know why there are so many McNaught comet photos out there? Either its the most visible comet ever, or we've reached the point where everyone has a digicam.
posted by damn dirty ape at 7:51 AM on February 5, 2007


One stop phenomena shopping.
posted by CynicalKnight at 7:58 AM on February 5, 2007


Its looks really processed, like an HDR photo.

It's not HDR, just a long exposure. I think people are saying it's stiched just because it's really wide. I don't consider that sort of thing to be "altering" the photo because it's not really altering, you're not showing anything that wasn't really there...
posted by delmoi at 8:08 AM on February 5, 2007


I think people are saying it's stiched just because it's really wide.

No, they're saying it's stitched because the APOD site says it's stitched:

"The above image is actually a three photograph panorama digitally processed to reduce red reflections from the exploding firework."
posted by dnash at 8:16 AM on February 5, 2007


Either its the most visible comet ever, or we've reached the point where everyone has a digicam.

It's one of the brightest comets in recent history.
posted by dseaton at 8:18 AM on February 5, 2007


I think people are saying it's stiched just because it's really wide.

The last line of the caption reads: "The above image is actually a three photograph panorama digitally processed to reduce red reflections from the exploding firework."

So, right above the promise of an exploding sun tomorrow, it says it's been stitched together from three individual photos. Here's the rightmost individual photo and the where it fits in with the whole composited shot. Both are located at the photographer's site.
posted by now i'm piste at 8:20 AM on February 5, 2007


No, they're saying it's stitched because the APOD site says it's stitched:

"The above image is actually a three photograph panorama digitally processed to reduce red reflections from the exploding firework."


Which leads to the HDR-like quailties of the imagery, because the reflections are kinda screwy and the eye/mind intuitively knows something odd is afoot. Still gorgeous.
posted by loquacious at 8:20 AM on February 5, 2007


damn dirty ape-
There are so many pictures of it because it is incredibly bright, the brightest in the past 30 years and because of the proliferation of cameras. At its peak brightness you could snap a pic of it with only one or two second exposures. That and it is mighty big. Go back a few days on the astronomy pic of the day for an awesome image that is a northern and southern hemisphere view of the comet. you can see how far the tail is stretching. truly awesome.
posted by Phantomx at 8:23 AM on February 5, 2007


Thanks for linking to the actual website, instead of pulling a digg and just hotlinking to the image. At least mefi still has some class.
posted by tehloki at 8:38 AM on February 5, 2007


So, ladies and gentlemen, the candles are lit, the band plays softly and as the force-shielded dome above us fades into transparency, revealing a dark and sullen sky hung heavy with the ancient light of livid swollen stars, I can see we're all in for a fabulous evening's apocalypse!

~posted by Max Quordlepleen at The End of the Universe EST [+] [!]
posted by Rock Steady at 8:48 AM on February 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


It just seems a tiny bit sad that you have this extraordinary celestial event and yet we still blow off the shiny things right in front of it.
posted by Rumple at 9:21 AM on February 5, 2007


I actually had the good fortune to witness a simultaneous lightning storm/fireworks show in Providence once. The smoke from the fireworks built up to the point where all you could see was flashes of white and colored light interspersed through clouds and smoke, with explosions and thunder and driving rain. For a while there, it was like some kind of cosmic battle, then they ran out of fireworks and the just storm kept going. An amazing experience that I won't soon forget.
posted by cubby at 10:13 AM on February 5, 2007


My favorite part: "Tomorrow's picture: sun explodes"
posted by smackfu at 10:40 AM on February 5, 2007


Everyone seems to be missing out on the left-hand cloud formation depicting that facelift scene in Brazil .
posted by CynicalKnight at 10:40 AM on February 5, 2007


Tomorrow's picture: sun explodes

*looks out the window nervously, stockpiles canned food*
posted by brundlefly at 10:55 AM on February 5, 2007


The good demonstration of natural wonders!
posted by oMoses at 11:25 AM on February 5, 2007


So the comet heralds an exploding sun, symbolically rendered in the exploding fireworks of the...uh.....stuff.

And meanwhile here, every damn time there's a comet, meteors, eclipse, ANYTHING, it gets cloudy. Not. Fair.

(though maybe the clouds will help when the sun explodes)
posted by Salmonberry at 11:35 AM on February 5, 2007


Salmonberry, me too. There's an uncanny correlation between cloud cover and aurora borealis. It used to puzzle me, and then I remembered that I live in Maine, and cloud cover is the norm. but what's the use of living in a cold climate if you miss the aurora?
posted by theora55 at 2:03 PM on February 5, 2007


Aww, it’s pretty amazingly spectacular....I guess.


I would enjoy a picture of our asploding sun for at least 8 minutes.
posted by Smedleyman at 2:05 PM on February 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


If you have a means of getting that picture 8 minutes in advance I know a bunch of physicists who'd be interested in talking to you.
posted by true at 2:54 PM on February 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


quantum entanglement polaroid film?
posted by tehloki at 3:12 PM on February 5, 2007


That was a good shot - lights from three different sources:

Man, earth, and the cosmos.
posted by rougy at 4:25 PM on February 5, 2007


One of my sixth graders discovered APOD a few weeks back, and every day during their 15-minute break breathlessly asks me, "Can I go see today's astronomy picture?" He always asks this with the air of someone saying "I know I'm asking a lot of you, but ..."

Heh. As if I'm ever going to say no.
posted by Chanther at 6:55 PM on February 5, 2007


is that a comet verily?
posted by dminor at 8:53 PM on February 5, 2007


7:59...7:58...7:57...

**frantically looks for sunscreen**
posted by grateful at 7:15 AM on February 6, 2007


Wonderful image, thanks ztdavis.
posted by nickyskye at 4:26 PM on February 6, 2007


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