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Room for cheese?
May 10, 2007 10:32 AM   Subscribe

Wild Recipes. And by "wild" they mean "different." I'll say: I like to take bologna and put it on a hot dog bun with string cheese and orange marmalade in the middle of the bologna, then micro wave it to melt the cheese a little--about 1 minute. Yum! I also like grape jelly and roast beef sandwhiches. I like grilled cheese sanwhiches, with strawberry jam and ham as the filling. Hamburgers on a plate, no bun, smothered in syrup or honey is good too.
posted by KevinSkomsvold (78 comments total) 5 users marked this as a favorite

 
Inspired by the Kool-Aid Pickle post, I tried to find a recipe I heard about that combined coffee and cheese. I found this site instead. Woah.
posted by KevinSkomsvold at 10:33 AM on May 10, 2007


A friend of my older sister's loved raw ground beef, ketchup and salt mixed together. This was in the '80s, before the recent mad cow scare, among others. She was also very attractive, so at the time I liked to think of it as a quirk rather than a disgusting preference.
posted by krinklyfig at 10:41 AM on May 10, 2007


I put sweet pickle relish on tacos.
posted by DU at 10:41 AM on May 10, 2007


Why the fuck are there so many recipes with INSECTS?? Jeebus, who are these people?

(That said, I would like a peanut butter and bacon sandwich for lunch, kthxbi.)
posted by tristeza at 10:42 AM on May 10, 2007


...before the recent mad cow scare...

Doesn't matter. Cooking beef doesn't reduce the risk of getting mad cow from it.
posted by DU at 10:42 AM on May 10, 2007


tristeza writes "Why the fuck are there so many recipes with INSECTS?? Jeebus, who are these people?

"(That said, I would like a peanut butter and bacon sandwich for lunch, kthxbi.)"


Calf brains (or a brain from something) seem to be a favorite too.
posted by KevinSkomsvold at 10:44 AM on May 10, 2007


Hard salami and grape jelly is an age-old tradition in my family.
posted by chrisamiller at 10:49 AM on May 10, 2007


The Original Road Kill Cookbook.
posted by ericb at 10:49 AM on May 10, 2007


Raw ground beef (really lean stuff), finely minced onion, capers and dry mustard -- that's pretty good on crackers or rye bread. We used to call that "cannibal sandwiches." Ideally, talk to your butcher; ask him to pick you out a really lean piece of tenderloin and wash the grinder beforehand.

I knew a guy who claimed to have lavishly spread peanut butter and grape jelly all over steaks before putting 'em on the grill. I've never been brave enough to risk ruining a perfectly good steak with that outlandish-sounding marinade.
posted by pax digita at 10:52 AM on May 10, 2007


While that raw ground beef recipe is tasty, pax digita, it isn't exactly strange. It's very close to the preparation of steak tartare. I'm not sure a common traditional dish counts as outlandish.

So it wasn't a cannibal sandwich, it was a traditional filet americain, as it is known overseas.
posted by Justinian at 10:55 AM on May 10, 2007


Pickles and peanut butter are surprisingly good... the sweet butter/sandwich kind. Have a regular peanut butter sandwich and dot it with 5 small pickles. You'll be startled at how much better it tastes. The pickles just disappear, but the peanut butter flavor becomes much more... peanutty, I guess.

Oh, and as far as mad cow goes: cooking doesn't affect prions. Even autoclaves don't kill the little bastards. Raw meat is just as safe as it ever was.
posted by Malor at 11:02 AM on May 10, 2007


Hey

Peanut butter and bacon actually isnt half bad...

when I was like ten or so....I used to make peanut butter and mustard sandwiches all the time.....not half bad either

then again...there's a reason I dont have a PBS cooking show
posted by timsteil at 11:03 AM on May 10, 2007


tristeza writes "(That said, I would like a peanut butter and bacon sandwich for lunch, kthxbi.)"

Ah, a favorite of Elvis'. I prefer peanut butter and dill pickle. Tastes great after a swim.
posted by krinklyfig at 11:05 AM on May 10, 2007


Oh, and as far as mad cow goes: cooking doesn't affect prions.

This is why switched over to ground turkey for dishes that usually call for ground beef. Which might also be a candidate comment for "weird recipes", except that most ground beef recipes (tacos, stew, etc) are so heavily flavored that you can't tell the difference. You can with hamburgers, though, so I still use beef for that.

You can call it alarmist or you can call it zero-cost risk reduction.
posted by DU at 11:06 AM on May 10, 2007


Most of those recipes are something worse than disgusting: plain unappetizing.
posted by bigschmoove at 11:07 AM on May 10, 2007


A friend of mine drinks something that would make it here: whisky and chocolate milk on ice or served hot in the cold months.

And the links at the bottom of the page leaves me wondering what they mean by "Gook Book"?
posted by peeedro at 11:13 AM on May 10, 2007


Steak tartare isn't what I was calling outlandish, Justinian. I know it's a raw egg away from the way I like my ground chuck.

Steak a la Peter Pan and Welch's is what I was calling outlandish.
posted by pax digita at 11:14 AM on May 10, 2007


It's very close to the preparation of steak tartare.

Yeah -- add pepper, Worcestershire sauce and the optional raw egg on top and you've got steak tartare.
posted by ericb at 11:15 AM on May 10, 2007


Inspired by the Kool-Aid Pickle post

yeah, yeah . . . try to put the blame on me, whydoncha? :)

Scrapple:

1 hog's head
4 to 5 quarts cold water
4 teaspoons salt
4 teaspoons powdered sage
yellow corn meal (about 3 cups)


I had this for breakfast a lot when I was a kid. We did, of course, gloss over the "hog's head" part of it. You knew that there were pig parts involved but you tried very hard not to devote too much thought to the specifics.
posted by jason's_planet at 11:20 AM on May 10, 2007


Not the weirdest thing in the world, but my girlfriend likes to spread strawberry jelly and mayonnaise on her burgers.

She also dips her pizza slices in balsamic vinaigrette before each bite. Somehow this seems much weirder to me.

But I knew it was love when I saw her doing shots of barbecue sauce straight from the bottle and found it endearing.
posted by hifiparasol at 11:21 AM on May 10, 2007


Hard salami and grape jelly is an age-old tradition in my family.

OH MY GOD. When I was little, my favorite snack was pepperoni and grape jelly! Who knew there were others like me?
posted by Greg Nog at 11:23 AM on May 10, 2007


I am the local High Priest of the Shandy.

When the weather is nice, the first thing I do when I get home is don my ceremonial robes and vast, complicated headpiece and start a'mixin up some delicious shandies.

Being a member of the American Orthodox Shandy congregation, I usually mix up the classic lemonade and lager, but recently my chants have become for fervored and I have begun to try sprite and lemon sodas. This way is the Devil's path, however, and I fear that the serpent shall have a bulb of Orangina in my hand soon.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 11:24 AM on May 10, 2007 [1 favorite]


Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches with yellow mustard. Don't mock it before you've tried it. You'll thank me later.
posted by blue_beetle at 11:26 AM on May 10, 2007


I have a friend who dreamed he made a fortune selling café con queso. Some time later, we actually put EZ Cheez in some coffee and tried it. I had to drink two shots of Mezcal to get the taste out of my mouth.
posted by Token Meme at 11:26 AM on May 10, 2007


Favorites of mine include peanut butter, honey, and cheese sandwiches, or just honey and cheese. That said, where does one purchase:

1/2 cup dry-roasted crickets
1 cup dry-roasted rootworm beetles
1/4 cup dry-roasted army worms
1 hog's head
1 hog's tongue

And is there any other kind of roasting? I thought it was a "dry" method by definition.
posted by rossmik at 11:27 AM on May 10, 2007


everybody should have their own little manual clamp/crank meat grinder. i love mine, and it gives me much greater confidence in ground meat.
posted by bruce at 11:27 AM on May 10, 2007


Repent, o' bloody robot, for thou words are a smite upon mine eyes!
posted by NationalKato at 11:28 AM on May 10, 2007


A friend of mine drinks something that would make it here: whisky and chocolate milk on ice or served hot in the cold months.

This isn't so weird, I've drunk whisky (or better yet brandy) mixed with hot chocolate on many a cold night. Delicious!

The only weird combo of mine I can think of is fried baloney sandwiches. Put the baloney in a pan with a little butter, sprinkle brown sugar on top, and fry until 1 side is crispy. Tastes far better than it sounds.
posted by TungstenChef at 11:32 AM on May 10, 2007


I'm sure I can't be the only one, but on Thanksgivings, I mash together all the contents of my plate (turkey, mashed potatoes, yams, stuffing, etc.) into one giant medley. Most delicious meal of the year.
posted by Mach3avelli at 11:36 AM on May 10, 2007


Lime Pickle and Peanut Butter Sandwiches are exactly as awesome as they sound, which means that they are completely awesome. Also, despite the instructions there, hot lime pickle works great.
posted by moss at 11:41 AM on May 10, 2007


I grew up with bacon and strawberry preserves on toast. So. Good.
...But I wonder...

Rootworm Beetle Dip

Ingredients:
2 cup low-fat cottage cheese
1 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons skim milk
1/2 cup reduced calorie mayonnaise
1 tablespoon parsley, chopped
1 tablespoon onion, chopped
1 1/2 tsp. dill weed
1 1/2 tsp. Beau Monde
1 cup dry-roasted rootworm beetles


why so conscientious with the fat content, bugeaters?
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur at 11:43 AM on May 10, 2007


Repent, o' bloody robot, for thou words are a smite upon mine eyes!

Never! For lo, am I not girded in righteousness? Does not my right hand bear lager while my left bears lemondade? Am I not refreshed?*

Step no father, heathen, lest I utter the forbidden names of Shandygaff, Panaché, and Radler upon your doorstep, reducing your home to naught but ashes and empty beer cans.

* From Paul's Letters to the Parched 18:45
posted by robocop is bleeding at 11:44 AM on May 10, 2007 [1 favorite]


I'm a big fan of banana and Miracle Whip sandwiches. (Miracle Whip, not mayonnaise. Because that would just be gross.)
posted by flod at 11:45 AM on May 10, 2007


I have a German friend who claims that raw ground pork and finely chopped onions served on dark rye bread is a popular dish in her neck of the woods.

All I could think of was "I bet your entire family has worms."
posted by solid-one-love at 11:47 AM on May 10, 2007


Strawberry preserves on garlic/cheese sourdough. Yum.
posted by Big_B at 11:57 AM on May 10, 2007


Rather a fan of the Red Eye myself.

Lager and tomato juice.
posted by MiltonRandKalman at 12:08 PM on May 10, 2007


And is there any other kind of roasting? I thought it was a "dry" method by definition.

When you do roasted potatoes or roasted vegetables, many recipes call for them to be tossed in olive oil + various herbs ahead of time. You can also baste things with oils and butter during roasting. Presumably dry roasting uses none of these things.
posted by Zinger at 12:13 PM on May 10, 2007


I'm a big fan of putting vinegar on my mashed potatoes with a bit'o'butter and some salt. I like my Minute Rice the same way. Not too weird, but yummy. My wife thinks it's weird, but I showed her....I said, 'Oh yeah? Well, you're weird!'. Nice.
posted by Shfishp at 12:16 PM on May 10, 2007


I'm part Lebanese, and one of my very favorite things to make/eat is kibbeh nyah, which is basically raw lamb, bulgher wheat, onions and a ton of spices. Make a little cucumber yogurt salad and it's sheer heaven on a pita.
posted by dejah420 at 12:19 PM on May 10, 2007


Lager and tomato juice

Yeecch. I think I just threw-up a li'l bit in my mouth.
posted by ericb at 12:20 PM on May 10, 2007


I like to take bologna and put it on a hot dog bun with string cheese and orange marmalade in the middle of the bologna, then micro wave it to melt the cheese a little--about 1 minute.

This reminds me of the Microwave Gourmet from Gremlins 2.
posted by brundlefly at 12:20 PM on May 10, 2007


Pepperoni wrapped around Frosted Mini Wheats. Good shit.
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 12:27 PM on May 10, 2007


Yeecch. I think I just threw-up a li'l bit in my mouth.
posted by ericb


ericb, can you save that for me? I'm putting together my own Wild Recipe!
posted by NationalKato at 12:28 PM on May 10, 2007


Simple but good:

Slice of fresh soft white sandwich bread.
Slather with butter.
Add potato chips.
Fold over.
Eat.
posted by notreally at 12:29 PM on May 10, 2007


Y'all are some mighty adventurous eaters. And to think I once thought myself daring for having tried some of the concoctions favored by college buddies -- like putting ketchup on scrambled eggs and mixing a half-glass of Coke with a half-glass of chocolate milk over ice.
posted by ericb at 12:41 PM on May 10, 2007


A few months ago my SO and I decided to really try to reduce the amount of leftovers we toss out. I’ve found that as long as it’s a meat/starch type leftover almost anything can be palatable wrapped in a burrito wrap with some cheddar cheese and peppercorn dressing. Everything tastes… well pretty much like cheddar and PC dressing. I realize that’s not much of a recipe, and god forbid the day I’m so short on funds I’m reduced to eating animal heads and bugs, but if it came to that I guess this is how I’d do it.
posted by BostonJake at 12:42 PM on May 10, 2007


Rather a fan of the Red Eye myself.

Lager and tomato juice.


That's popular in Minnesota, where it's called a red beer. Despite what ericb thinks, it's not that bad (ever had a bloody mary with a beer chaser?)

Red eye, on the other hand, is an awful mixture of burnt sugar, grenadine, and everclear where I come from (ND). It's served at weddings where the poor groom (me!!!) is forced to take shot after shot of the stuff. I shudder every time I think about it.
posted by TungstenChef at 12:46 PM on May 10, 2007


Soy bacon - the morningstar farms stuff that looks like oddly painted cardboard and is dangerously addictive - and peanut butter on toast is the king of quick breakfast sandwiches. Even better than the real bacon and peanut butter sandwich, I swear. When I was a kid my mother used to make me butter, applesauce, lettuce and powdered sugar sandwiches on white bread and they rocked then although okay, I'm afraid to try them now.
posted by mygothlaundry at 12:47 PM on May 10, 2007


I also wonder how many of these food combinations were discovered as a result of hazy bouts of the "munchies."
posted by ericb at 12:50 PM on May 10, 2007


On preview, lager & tomato juice is called a bloody beer in South Carolina and I had a boyfriend once who swore by them for hangovers but I have no interest in ever, ever trying one.
posted by mygothlaundry at 12:50 PM on May 10, 2007


pax digita writes 'Raw ground beef (really lean stuff), finely minced onion, capers and dry mustard -- that's pretty good on crackers or rye bread.'

That's essentially a hybrid of steak tartare and tartamad. Are you Danish, by any chance?
posted by jack_mo at 12:50 PM on May 10, 2007


Also, for some reason this thread has made me crave ackee - not weird food if you're Jamaican, but I'm always slightly creeped out by it: there's something distinctly odd about eating a fruit that looks and tastes pretty much like scrambled eggs.
posted by jack_mo at 12:56 PM on May 10, 2007


I used to eat Head Cheese and Chitterlings until I found out what they were.
posted by doctorschlock at 1:34 PM on May 10, 2007


jason's_planet writes "Inspired by the Kool-Aid Pickle post

"yeah, yeah . . . try to put the blame on me, whydoncha? :)



Ah, but you are my inspiration!

Re: Red Beer. Yes, as a Minnesotan, I recall many a summer days out on the porch watching my mom and her friend down a few mugs of this stuff. V-8 mixed with Special Export. Ughh!
posted by KevinSkomsvold at 1:37 PM on May 10, 2007


beer and tomato juice has several different names throughout the midwest and south.

Here in SF, I call it a conversation starter.
posted by MiltonRandKalman at 1:43 PM on May 10, 2007


From my Dear Old Dad, Peanut butter, mayo and banana sammich.

My kids and half of Texas, ketchup on their eggs. Mages me gag!

I put my sausage patty or my bacon between my pancakes and add lots of butter and syrup...mmmmm - bacon and syrup!
posted by winks007 at 1:45 PM on May 10, 2007


My wife likes fried bologna. The smell will run me out of the house and into my detached safe-haven.
posted by winks007 at 1:46 PM on May 10, 2007


Up here in Canada, I have wacky friends who LOVE a variation of the Red Eye. They substitute tomato juice with Clamato (a clam/tomato) juice. It is shite.

Even though...

I love beer and I love a nice Caesar, where Clamato is the main ingredient, but mix'em up, and it is pure yuck.
posted by Shfishp at 1:55 PM on May 10, 2007


I'm curious about the Red Eye. What proportion of beer to tomato juice are we talking here? One shot of juice in a beer? 50/50? I might try it.
posted by jeff-o-matic at 2:04 PM on May 10, 2007


If we're talking Elvis, I highly recommend the Grilled Peanut Butter and Banana sandwich.

But I draw the line at Peter Pan- must have Arrowhead Mills PB
posted by MtDewd at 2:05 PM on May 10, 2007



I'm curious about the Red Eye. What proportion of beer to tomato juice are we talking here? One shot of juice in a beer? 50/50? I might try it.

It's 1 shot of tomato juice to 1 beer as I know it. You can also add traditional bloody mary seasoniongs like a dash of Worcestershire or hot sauce.
posted by TungstenChef at 2:11 PM on May 10, 2007


It's 1 shot of tomato juice to 1 beer as I know it.
yeah about right, 2oz shoot to a pint.

salt to taste.
posted by MiltonRandKalman at 2:17 PM on May 10, 2007


This weekend I discovered the deliciousness that is a romano cheese bagel with peanut butter, red onion, and pickles. As so many have noted, PB works great with savory tastes.

A favorite of my grandmother's was chili with cottage cheese (separate bowls, a little of each on the spoon). Very tasty, and cools the heat if your chili is spicy.

This isn't weird, exactly, but it's good, and something that hadn't occurred to me until I tried it in a moment of desperation: a root beer float made with chocolate rather than vanilla ice cream.
posted by ottereroticist at 2:37 PM on May 10, 2007


Dried red pepper flakes on a peanut-butter sammich. I call it "inexplicably delicious".
posted by rifflesby at 2:50 PM on May 10, 2007


My mom's got a bunch of old church-lady fundraiser cookbooks from 1950s Minnesota. They're filled with Jello combinations that trouble my soul. I believe there's even a song, "Lime Jello Marshmallow Cottage Cheese Surprise." The closest I've seen to a matching recipe also included carrots and maybe some miracle whip. I can't bring myself to try making any of them, but apparently people used to think that kind of food was good.
posted by vytae at 2:52 PM on May 10, 2007


ericb writes "mixing a half-glass of Coke with a half-glass of chocolate milk over ice"

That's not too far from a Colorado Bulldog (essentially a tall white russian with a top of coke).
posted by krinklyfig at 2:54 PM on May 10, 2007


An old college girlfriend of mine used to love steamed white rice, soy sauce and sour cream wrapped in a flour tortilla. It was the most pointless burrito ever.

N-thing the peanut butter/bacon combo. On toasted cinnamon-raisin bread!
posted by emelenjr at 3:01 PM on May 10, 2007


I believe there's even a song, "Lime Jello Marshmallow Cottage Cheese Surprise."

I have a hard and fast rule about not ordering anything with 'Surprise' in the name. The only surprise should how many drinks your ordered when the bill comes.
posted by MiltonRandKalman at 3:31 PM on May 10, 2007


With beer and tomato juice you're most of the way to a Michelada. Yummy!
posted by magicbus at 4:18 PM on May 10, 2007


The beer and tomato juice reminds me of that classic cocktail, red wine and Coca-cola. Popular with both Glaswegian housewives and Russian oligarchs. (It's probably a faintly racist urban myth, but I've heard a sommelier tell of reds worth many thousands of pounds a bottle being doused with coke. By oligarchs, not housewives, obviously.)
posted by jack_mo at 5:30 PM on May 10, 2007


The beer and tomato juice reminds me of that classic cocktail, red wine and Coca-cola.

Actually those are called Calimochos, huge in Spain.
posted by MiltonRandKalman at 5:38 PM on May 10, 2007


"As so many have noted, PB works great with savory tastes."

Yup, just think of all that Indonesian peanut hot sauce, including over salad (Gado-gado).
posted by Listener at 5:39 PM on May 10, 2007


Fried bologna is awesome - think about it, it's basically a hot dog!

Neither of these things are that gross, but it's all I've got:

As a kid, my siblings and I used to pretend we were royalty and walk around wearing capes and whatnot. And we would make hors d'oeurves - Ritz crakers + American cheese, melted in the microwave. When they come out, add a slice of a dill pickle and enjoy.

Also, the famous Hot Truck in Ithaca, NY serves (or served, in my day - I've heard Bob sold the Truck a few years back) french bread pizzas with all kinds of things on them. My favorite combo? The WGC (Wet Garlic and Cheese - garlic bread, sauce, and cheese) with grease (mayo), garden (lettuce), sunshine (mustard), and onion.
posted by misskaz at 5:51 PM on May 10, 2007


I'm getting intestinal cramps just reading this thread.
posted by lekvar at 6:15 PM on May 10, 2007


So who're ready for the most awesome meetup evah?
posted by robocop is bleeding at 6:18 PM on May 10, 2007


See also, which segued into this one.
Here's a riddle: What do you call shit mixed with NASA's favorite beverage?
posted by rob511 at 6:43 PM on May 10, 2007


I wonder if these recipes are all symptoms of pica.
posted by stavrogin at 8:42 PM on May 10, 2007


I don't know why anyone would think that salami/jelly was so strange - when I was a kid, a favorite cocktail snack my folks served at parties was: kosher salami (peeled), scored with a knife, covered with a mixture of apricot preserves and mustard, and baked. When it came out of the oven it would be sliced, and served on little slices of Rubschlager rye. That salami was always gone in seconds.

It was very similar to this recipe:

http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,174,157178-227202,00.html
posted by pinky at 8:10 PM on May 11, 2007


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