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Gordon Ramsey Hates Liars
May 20, 2007 1:12 PM   Subscribe


 
Is it just me, or are those scrambled eggs a bit too runny? I like his presentation style though.
posted by rolypolyman at 1:19 PM on May 20, 2007


Gordon Ramsay likes horse meat ... and recommends it.
posted by ericb at 1:22 PM on May 20, 2007


No, no, those scrambled eggs are just right. (My wife wouldn't agree; that's why she leaves her eggs in longer.)

Nice post!
posted by languagehat at 1:22 PM on May 20, 2007


Runny scrambled eggs. :: shudder ::
posted by The Deej at 1:24 PM on May 20, 2007


it's confusing at first if you're used to fahrenheit. he keeps saying that 200 degrees is a hot oven.
posted by snofoam at 1:26 PM on May 20, 2007


As a lame American of Midwestern origin, I've tended toward a rather philistine outlook on fancy cooking, and watching Ramsay's take on scrambled eggs reminds me why-- scrambled eggs don't need creme fraiche, or a tablespoon of butter. They need to be properly cooked, and salted and peppered to taste. I just don't understand why one would need to get fancy with eggs, which when fresh are just about perfect right out of the shell.
posted by Kwantsar at 1:31 PM on May 20, 2007


BTW -- Gordon Ramsay's "Hell's Kitchen "is back for a third season (starting June 4th.) here in the States.
posted by ericb at 1:41 PM on May 20, 2007


Lesson for the day: It is better to be an honest prat than a lying prat.
posted by miss lynnster at 1:41 PM on May 20, 2007


YOU DEEP FAT FRIED THESE POTATOES ! LIIAAAR !
*takes iron spatula, beheads the ivil french chef*
posted by elpapacito at 1:47 PM on May 20, 2007


it's confusing at first if you're used to fahrenheit. he keeps saying that 200 degrees is a hot oven.

That's nothing. Sometimes in the winter when my apartment gets cold I turn the oven up to 200°F and sit inside.
posted by tepidmonkey at 1:49 PM on May 20, 2007


The broccoli soup is extra-delicious. I have made it before (:
posted by ambilevous at 1:50 PM on May 20, 2007


I really enjoy Ramsey's shows on the BBC. Highly entertaining. Hell's Kitchen not so much.

As to the eggs, I was always taught that if they are done in the pan, they will be overdone on the plate.
posted by vronsky at 1:50 PM on May 20, 2007


I enjoy watching his program 'The F Word' here on BBC America. He's cantankerous -- all in his search for greatness and perfection. While mostly off-putting to many, one can see many moments of his "softer side." He cares deeply about quality cooking ... and about illuminating such to his colleagues and customers.
posted by ericb at 1:52 PM on May 20, 2007


I agree with languagehat and vronsky...those eggs are just about perfect, although I've always melted the butter beforehand. Maybe I'll try it his way.
posted by lackutrol at 1:56 PM on May 20, 2007


Weird, "The F Word" is not shown on the BBC in Britain -- it's on Channel 4.

But yeah, I think I'd start gagging if I attempted to eat scrambled eggs that gooey. Sorry Gord.
posted by afx237vi at 2:02 PM on May 20, 2007


You don't want to ask Ramsay for pumpkin.
posted by Aloysius Bear at 2:08 PM on May 20, 2007


Ditto the scrambled eggs being too runny. Other than that they sounded quite good. The cream is a bit fancier than the milk I used but it does taste good.
posted by MrBobaFett at 2:10 PM on May 20, 2007


Weird, "The F Word" is not shown on the BBC in Britain -- it's on Channel 4.

BBC America has bought the rights to a bunch of C4 shows for US broadcast, e.g. Father Ted.

They also show Footballers Wives, which was ITV IIRC.
posted by dw at 2:12 PM on May 20, 2007


That scrambled eggs link was fun!

This scrambled egg link is fun, too: Perfect Scrambled Eggs by Negativland.
posted by 2or3whiskeysodas at 2:12 PM on May 20, 2007


To my eyes, there's nothing at all runny about those eggs -- they're perfectly cooked, just coagulated, nice and creamy. True, the butter and crème fraîche is gilding it a bit, but the cooking technique is spot on. Gentle heat and lots of stirring is the key.
posted by sriracha at 2:35 PM on May 20, 2007


Ramsay is a hero of mine. He tolerates no bullshit in the pursuit of doing things properly. And his recipes are spot on.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 2:42 PM on May 20, 2007


Ramsay embodies a key principle that years of Usenet taught me well; Being an asshole doesn't mean you aren't right. But by the same token, being right doesn't mean that you aren't an asshole.
posted by Justinian at 2:52 PM on May 20, 2007


Thank you for this - I've been trying to figure out why my eggs end up a bit lumpy and obviously I'm not stirring enough.
posted by joannemerriam at 2:56 PM on May 20, 2007


I like Gordon Ramsey. I like his intensity and passion. I like that he swears a blue and purple streak.

I do blame him for bringing "spot on" into the American lexicon. There's nothing wrong with the phrase itself, but it should be spoken with a British accent. Hearing it in our American twang is jarring.

Though, just once, I'd like to hear GWBush say it. Just to kill that phrase dead.
posted by mmahaffie at 2:58 PM on May 20, 2007


The best egg tip I ever read was from Eric Ripert. Beat the eggs in a bowl and add cream or sour cream. Then, put the mixture into a COLD pan and turn stovetop to medium. Continuosly stir as the heat comes up and you will be rewarded with beautifully soft and delicious scrambled eggs.

(also I love it when Ramsey screams "you DONKEY!". His best shows are Kitchen Nightmares and Boiling Point though.)
posted by vronsky at 3:14 PM on May 20, 2007 [1 favorite]


ericb, thank you for alerting me to this wanker's meat preference. Ugh. There are many, many people who know lots of things about cooking and are -not- advocates of this, and they are the ones from whom I'll take my advice, thanks.
posted by po at 3:15 PM on May 20, 2007


So, by your standards, the French know nothing about cooking? Interesting.
posted by languagehat at 3:18 PM on May 20, 2007


They're doing a US version of Kitchen Nightmares this fall (to air Thu at 9 PM). It's a much better show than Hell's Kitchen, and shows that Ramsay is actually a good chef and a good guy. I'm not sure if it's going to be the same format — the UK seasons are only 4 to 6 episodes long.

Incidentally, Hell's Kitchen in the UK is a much different show than the US one. It's a Big Brother-style show with celebrities doing the cooking, and the viewers voting people off.
posted by smackfu at 3:24 PM on May 20, 2007


languagehat, how'd you get that conclusion out of what I said?

I simply have no need or desire to take cooking lessons from someone whose tastes make me physically ill. (and from the sound of those articles, his style of delivery doesn't sound charming, either.) If I feel the need to watch a cooking show, there are plenty of other knowledgeable folks who do not make me feel sick to my stomach that I can watch instead.
posted by po at 3:27 PM on May 20, 2007


Eat horse? Neigh!
posted by smackfu at 3:32 PM on May 20, 2007


Liars...?
posted by sparkletone at 3:34 PM on May 20, 2007


The New Yorker on Ramsay (in true New Yorker style, it's ten pages long with about eight devoted to explaining that sometimes he gets a bit angry).
posted by Aloysius Bear at 3:42 PM on May 20, 2007


My scrambled egg "recipe."

Scramble with a splash of milk. Cook with real butter, stirring constantly.

They are a big hit with my guests at the canoe house in Amsterdam.
posted by The Deej at 3:50 PM on May 20, 2007


Whoa! I now feel fat. I should have avoided watching those before breakfast, but my interest was sufficiently piqued that I had to wander up to the shop for cream and butter. And I added a little mature cheese. Beautiful. But rich, very rich. Thanks sluglicker, I'll send the bill for my triple coronary bypass.
posted by peacay at 3:55 PM on May 20, 2007


Carrying a dead deer through the restaurant has to be some sort of health code violation, doesn't it? I mean, ewww, think of all the ticks.

Or maybe those English deer are too proper to have parasites. I dunno.
posted by mr_crash_davis at 3:59 PM on May 20, 2007


(and sometimes I add some American or cheddar cheese.)
posted by The Deej at 4:02 PM on May 20, 2007


I love Gordon Ramsey. He'll be opening a new restaurant in an Irish hotel the same weekend my brother gets married there. I am strongly considering ditching the wedding to go back to my roots and get a job peeling spuds in the kitchen instead.
posted by jamesonandwater at 4:02 PM on May 20, 2007


I love Gordon Ramsey, i actually bought the book that included the dvd that these scenes are from. I made the salmon, and it was one of the best pieces of fish i've ever had.
posted by Derek at 4:04 PM on May 20, 2007


Higher quality quicktime and more recipes at the Times Online
posted by rschroed at 4:18 PM on May 20, 2007






His scrambled eggs looked pretty good to me, too. His mushrooms and tomatoes were a little undercooked, but I suspect that's more a hazard of the short presentation. I'd have kept them going for another 10 minutes.
posted by Dave Faris at 4:43 PM on May 20, 2007


I'd just like to take this opportunity to come to the defense of horse meat. I have yet to have the pleasure of making it's acquaintance, but it's long been on my to do list. It is, I hear, the most ethical of meats, the anti-veal if you will, in that the older the animal the more tender it's meat. Hence a horse can live a long, pleasant, and natural life and still produce choice yield. It's outrageous to me when people make some big show of their disgust for unusual meats, as though there were some divinely appointed difference between one quadruped and another. Especially considering how repugnant the modern industrial meat production and harvesting system is, to which, I repeat, horse meat is apparently antithetical. In short, eating horses is being nice to horses, and beef is often gross.
posted by kaspen at 4:53 PM on May 20, 2007 [4 favorites]


Those eggs look delicious! I like my eggs nice and smooth. I usually cook mine with milk and/or cream but I've been known to use sour cream too and it is really nice for a change.

Also, if I don't have any chives I'll sometimes add a little bit of very finely chopped onion to my scrambled eggs if I feel like something different.

On preview: I agree with Dave Farris that the mushrooms and tomatoes were a bit undercooked and I also think the bread could have done with a few more minutes in the toaster.
posted by sveskemus at 5:00 PM on May 20, 2007


It's outrageous to me when people make some big show of their disgust for unusual meats, as though there were some divinely appointed difference between one quadruped and another.

Indeed, perhaps if you don't like meat at all there would be some logic involved, but not eating the cuter animals is pure hypocrisy.
posted by mek at 5:11 PM on May 20, 2007


I prefer to eat the cute animals. I'm currently hoping to find a nice Scottish Fold to eat.

mmmm tasty.
posted by Justinian at 5:29 PM on May 20, 2007


I recently found something that profoundly changed my scrambled eggs. This English fellow and his female partner (could be the other way around, I simply don't know) sell a fresh goat cheese mixture - garlic and a few other herbs - at the Hollywood Farmers Market and it transforms scrambled eggs (or salads) into sublime eating. I just follow the basic milk and butter approach and in the final moments I sprinkle in the fairy dust goat magic and serve. I've always been a goat cheese maniac, but my wife wouldn't go near the stuff. She claims that this is more subtle, more like feta. I couldn't care less as long as it comes out of a goat, it's in my fridge and on my food.

I'm always looking to add more animals to the growing list of things I don't eat and I admit that cuteness is a factor. It makes it easier to put them on the list. My principles are an inconvenient mess of emotions and logic. Why can't lambs be ugly? They are so damned tasty.
posted by lazymonster at 5:43 PM on May 20, 2007


Cooking is cooking, people like Jamie Oliver and Gordon Ramsay need ways to keep the basics fresh because it is their livelihood. I always remember one of the earlier Jamie Oliver programs about 5 years ago-

"Cook ya pasta, bish bosh, salt the water and add a splash of oil, not your best olive oil, any old supermarket brand will do."

Wow, Jamie has several olive oils and saves his best ones for when they will influence the flavour. The secret is not to waste expensive olive oil lubricaing pasta. Must note.

Cut to three seasons later and he's low on ideas but still stuck cooking some pasta dish

"Cook ya pasta, bish bosh, salt the water but don't bother adding oil. It clogs the pan and the idea that olive oil stops pasta sticking is a myth."

Television chefs will say anything if they think you will believe they are imparting their secrets to you. They usually aren't.
posted by fire&wings at 5:50 PM on May 20, 2007


Watching the guy cook makes me lose any appetite I might have had... Cooking is not a time trial.
posted by uncle harold at 6:05 PM on May 20, 2007


Keep in mind that Gordon is almost certainly starting with eggs at room temperature... YMMV. As to them appearing too runny, that's not because they're undercooked, but because he's pretty much made a smooth custard of them.

Me, I'd go for a bit of smoked salmon and dill, please.
posted by deCadmus at 6:16 PM on May 20, 2007


i've eaten horse meat, as sashimi. it's pretty good. like a beef carpaccio, but darker and softer and a little bit chewy.
posted by snofoam at 6:40 PM on May 20, 2007


fire&wings: It's not possible that Jamie managed to.. iunno.. learn something in the intervening years, instead of just making shit up?
I know that a couple of years ago he spent a lot of time going back to basics in Italy -- I'd be more inclined to suggest that his sojourn there taught him a few more tricks than he'd previously known......
posted by coriolisdave at 6:46 PM on May 20, 2007


His hilarious episodes of Kitchen Nightmares were absolutely fantastic, and were one of my main inspirations for getting off my lazy ass and cooking more often. Basic ingredients, simple processes, it doesn't have to be a hassle if you don't make it one.
posted by nightchrome at 6:53 PM on May 20, 2007


Silly as it may sound... I won't eat cute animals, that's my rule. I've eaten ostrich and buffalo, and I've eaten gator and felt fine about it -- not to mention that a gator would eat me in a second so it seems fair. But no ducks, no bunnies, no lambs, no puppies. My Austrian friend's ex-boyfriend was obsessed with trying to get me to eat a horse sandwich when I was there in 2001, and he lost that battle big time too. Not happening. Sorry.
posted by miss lynnster at 6:55 PM on May 20, 2007


dude is on speed.

i thought this was going to be one of those mockumentary tv sendups everyone likes so well...
posted by geos at 7:06 PM on May 20, 2007


"But it seemed to me that if humans eat chicken, then obviously they'd eat their own species, otherwise they'd just be picking on the chickens."

-Kryten
posted by uri at 7:12 PM on May 20, 2007


Silly as it may sound... I won't eat cute animals, that's my rule. I've eaten ostrich and buffalo, and I've eaten gator and felt fine about it -- not to mention that a gator would eat me in a second so it seems fair.

Aren't you just precious.
posted by Smart Dalek at 7:36 PM on May 20, 2007


Jamie Oliver: Easey Peasey! Pukka! Jools!
posted by ericb at 8:26 PM on May 20, 2007


I don't know what that is he made, but it's not scrambled eggs. He's made some sort of bastardized hollandaise, or something.

I mean, sometimes things are a certain way for a reason.

For example, if you use the same ingredients used in spaghetti, but you end up with a soup, you've no longer made the dish we call "spaghetti".
posted by Ynoxas at 8:35 PM on May 20, 2007 [1 favorite]


Good point, Ynoxas. Maybe his dish should be called Mushrooms, Tomatoes, and Toast with Egg Sauce.
posted by The Deej at 8:50 PM on May 20, 2007


It's really strange watching him on his cooking show, not swearing at anyone. Really, really strange. It'd be cool if he started freaking out at himself.
posted by chunking express at 8:57 PM on May 20, 2007


This man obviously doesn't know what he's on about. Scrambled eggs are brown and firm, with an orange crust of melted/hardened longhorn cheese and Tabasco on top.
posted by carsonb at 9:27 PM on May 20, 2007


Those eggs look so good. I don't usually make eggs w/ butter/milk/cream/green things, but I might try that recipe tomorrow.

Horse? I've had basashi, it's pretty good. Of course, I'll eat almost anything as long as mayonnaise isn't involved.
posted by betweenthebars at 10:05 PM on May 20, 2007


I have no problem with someone refusing to eat cute animals. I do have a problem with people forbidding me to eat cute animals, or attacking someone who advocates the eating of cute animals, unless they also advocate strict vegetarianism, don't wear leather, and buy cruelty free products.
posted by BrotherCaine at 10:50 PM on May 20, 2007


Heston Blumenthal is the best chef in Britain, and his eggs are perfect.

Ramsay gives ME nightmares. The whole thing on The F Word where he gets amateurs in and abuses the shit out of them is just unwatchable. The only times I like seeing him on the telly is when some celebrity cooks a dish in a classic style and everyone in the restaurant prefers it to Gordon's OTT version. Janet Street Porter has done this to him repeatedly.

I've figured out why there are so many celebrity chefs and TV shows (masterchef, in particular) in the UK: eating out here is so expensive that if you want to eat well, you have to learn to cook well.
posted by chuckdarwin at 1:30 AM on May 21, 2007


Watching the guy cook makes me lose any appetite I might have had... Cooking is not a time trial.

It is if you're running a fucking restaurant, you fucking donkey.
posted by The God Complex at 1:31 AM on May 21, 2007


Well I don't run a restaurant.

I also don't call people in peaceful cooking threads a fucking donkey, but to each his own.
posted by uncle harold at 2:04 AM on May 21, 2007


Gordon Ramsay and Simon Cowell prove that the worse you treat people, the faster your rise to television stardom.
posted by splitpeasoup at 2:10 AM on May 21, 2007


uncle harold: "Well I don't run a restaurant.

I also don't call people in peaceful cooking threads a fucking donkey, but to each his own.
"

I believe TGC was bringing a little of Gordon's piquant and inimical inimitable personal style to the thread.

Personally, I don't see where all the Gordon-love is coming from. The guy's a boor, a troll and an asshole, and proud of it. But hey, I don't like Clarkson either, so for my part I'm obviously a tosser.
posted by Drexen at 2:17 AM on May 21, 2007


believe TGC was bringing a little of Gordon's piquant and inimical inimitable personal style to the thread.

Watching it again with audio, your probably right. Ahem.
posted by uncle harold at 2:20 AM on May 21, 2007


Drexen: I was going to say that though I loathe Clarkson with a passion, I have a lot of time for Ramsay -- perhaps it's that the end product with Ramsay is extraordinarily good food, rather than the fatuous self-satisfied guff that Clarkson produces.
posted by patricio at 2:21 AM on May 21, 2007


Drexen, I find it very amusing that Mr Clarkson - a man who has made a career of taking the piss out of America - may well be broadcasting his #1 show Top Gear from the US...
posted by chuckdarwin at 2:32 AM on May 21, 2007


That's pretty much the way I do scrambled eggs. No creme freche, I usually drop in more butter. Yum. And runny yes. American scrambled eggs always seem like the crap you get served with McDonald's Big Breakfasts over here. Yuk.

Gordon Ramsay is a class act. I think these are the long versions of what is shown on his F-Word show which get edited down to 2 minute, punchy guides that show the cooking being don with a few key words thrown in. "Eggs! Into the pan!. Sour dough bread!. Off the heat! Stir! Tomatoes! Olive Oil! Serve!"

Good post!
posted by brautigan at 4:29 AM on May 21, 2007


I don't understand why a tasty end product allows you to treat people like dirt. I read that New Yorker article and was disgusted with how accepted Ramsay's behavior was. Maybe it's because I've worked in an abusive environment (not even close to as bad as Ramsay's kitchen) and know how horrific it can be...but it's just bullshit that his attitude is somehow OK because the end result is good.

I sometimes put chive cream cheese in scrambled eggs. Yum. And I don't even have to yell at anyone to enjoy a good meal!
posted by miss tea at 5:14 AM on May 21, 2007


Why did you bother with all the youtube links? Most of the additional videos came up in the "Related" YT tab from the scrambled egg link. That said, it was nice to see a lefty chef in some swift knife action.
posted by michswiss at 5:33 AM on May 21, 2007


The scrambled eggs he makes have been referred to me as "french style", and it's not just a recipe he's made up. If you're used to american style scrambled eggs, I can see how this might seem completely different to you, but you should give it a shot. The eggs are not runny, but come out more custard-y and creamy.

BTW, The old-school way of making these was to cook on very low heat and stir constantly for 30 minutes or so. I think it's only been recently that chef's relized they can use the high-heat/remove from heat method to cook these in a matter of minutes.

Fire & wings: As cooking has gotten more popular, people have been investigating/debunking myths in favor of a more scientific approach. He's right saying oil doesn't stop pasta from sticking together (although it does help break up surface tension and prevent the starch from causing the water to boil over). If you don't want your pasta to stick together, give it a quick rinse (or a splash of oil) after you drain it. If you do this though, your sauce isn't going to stick to the pasta, so it really depends on what your doing with the pasta.
posted by Crash at 5:45 AM on May 21, 2007


I don't understand why a tasty end product allows you to treat people like dirt.

Well, in a starred Micheline restaurant, the customers don't care how you treat the staff. And the staff can quit if they don't want to be abused. They choose to work for him regardless — or even follow Ramsay when he quits, in one memorable case.
posted by smackfu at 6:41 AM on May 21, 2007


Fuck Gordon Ramsay.

If I were on his show and he yelled at me to make his scrambled runny egg goop shit, I'd show up with a lukewarm McDonald's Egg McMuffin still in the wrapper, toss it to him, and say "Here are your eggs, stupid. Now what?"
posted by Pastabagel at 9:08 AM on May 21, 2007


That would show him.
posted by smackfu at 10:08 AM on May 21, 2007


Well I don't run a restaurant.

I also don't call people in peaceful cooking threads a fucking donkey, but to each his own.


Yes, just a bit of Ramsey for you ;)

Though, truthfully, if one is to run a restaurant I suspect the sort of speed and efficiency Ramsey shows is a necessity. I'm not a hug fan of Hell's Kitchen (Nightmare is far, far better, as you get to see the funny/soft side of Ramsey), but there was one truly hilarious episode where he ripped into one of the "contestants" for being too slow: "Here's what I suggest: buy a restaurant, put in one table, because anything more than that you're fucked."

Seriously though, if there's anyone here that hates Ramsey and has yet to catch Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares, I suggest you at least give it a shot. I absolutely loathed the guy after watching an episode of Hell's Kitchen, but find him to be an admirable rapscallion now! (And, after converting, if you will, I've found Hell's Kitchen to be somewhat enjoyable for what it is: comedy!).
posted by The God Complex at 10:43 AM on May 21, 2007


Sadly, the ranting raving boss is not a Ramsay trademark. I've encountered it more times in more jobs than I can remember.
posted by Pastabagel at 10:47 AM on May 21, 2007


Sure, but it's not like he's any old boss you might be randomly assigned to in a corporation or wherever, or one that appears normal at interview and turns out to be psycho later -- his personality traits are well known and yet junior chefs are clamouring to get to work for him. That doesn't give him free reign to act like a c.nt, or lessen how it feels to be screamed at, but to suggest he's just another ranting boss is missing the point.
posted by patricio at 11:36 AM on May 21, 2007


I love that last link.

Horse meat is delicious. You people who get 'physically ill' at the idea of eating it need to learn some self-discipline. Ideas should not make you ill.
posted by ikkyu2 at 1:10 PM on May 21, 2007 [1 favorite]


Um, ikkyu2, I generally like and respect what you say around here. But please do not tell me I need "self-discipline" to just get over it.

I've worked with horses since I was 6 years old, and have been closer to them than to many people in my life. I do not have any desire to "get over" my "hangup" about this particular issue. The idea of eating horsemeat, to me, has (as I'm sure you can guess) about the same emotional weight and impact as the idea of eating my little sisters, or my best friends.

I'm not on a campaign to stop everyone else from eating what they like. I recognize that this is a commonly accepted food source in other places and to other people, and for them, that's fine. But I myself have a gut reaction of physical revulsion at the idea of reducing creatures with whom I interact, who I have cared for and put countless amounts of time and effort and love into, and who have given me in turn their affection and utmost effort, into a hunk of meat on a plate. Or, perhaps even more, I hate the idea that what goes onto a plate never had such attention and effort put into it during life. I have a deep spiritual respect for horses, one which does not extend to packing them onto trucks and shipping them thousands of miles without food or water to be slaughtered and disarticulated and consumed anonymously, and then forgotten. I could get behind the consumption of a much-loved animal at the end of its life, by those who had cared for it in life, as a gesture of respect for the animal's work and utility, and allowing it to serve a final purpose.

Do these beliefs make me a hypocrite, someone who needs to grow up and learn self-discipline? Judge however you like, but do not tell me how to live my life and govern my preferences.
posted by po at 1:38 PM on May 21, 2007 [1 favorite]


Sadly, the ranting raving boss is not a Ramsay trademark.
we
Especially in a restaurant! Pretty much all the head chefs I've worked with were headcases. The rest were thieves.
posted by jamesonandwater at 1:42 PM on May 21, 2007


It's kind of funny that someone randomly posted that Ramsay advocated horsemeat (in the 2nd comment), and that randomly brought out someone for whom it's a hot button issue that they can't resist commenting on.
posted by smackfu at 1:54 PM on May 21, 2007


what po said.
posted by Pallas Athena at 3:11 PM on May 21, 2007


I would absolutely eat horse meat. However, here in the heart of Canada cowboy country, it's unlikely.

But I've eaten every meat I've had a chance to...ostrich, bison, kangaroo, duck, goose, turkey, pig, cow, chicken, grouse, deer, moose, caribou, elk, bear, muskox...and more (lots of various fishes, of course). I'm thrilled every time I get a chance for something new. Maybe I'll seek out snake next.
posted by Kickstart70 at 4:37 PM on May 21, 2007


Aren't you just precious.

Why yes. Yes, I am. Thank you for noticing.
posted by miss lynnster at 7:24 PM on May 21, 2007 [1 favorite]


creatures with whom I interact, who I have cared for and put countless amounts of time and effort and love into, and who have given me in turn their affection and utmost effort, into a hunk of meat on a plate.

Since you haven't cared (presumably) for the actual, specific horses Ramsay cooks, why is this an argument against eating horsemeat, rather than an argument for vegetarianism?
posted by game warden to the events rhino at 10:41 AM on May 22, 2007


Kickstart70, you are missing all the reptiles, snake, gator, etc... the ones I've had all have a similar flavor. There's a kind of musky taste to the meat that is indescribable, not unpleasant, but probably an acquired taste. If you like ostrich, emu is good too.

Oh, and if you are epicurious, you've got to try uni if you haven't already.
posted by BrotherCaine at 2:46 AM on May 25, 2007


Game Warden, she has an emotional response to horses, and she's not arguing that anyone else should forgo horsemeat. I'll assume you misread her post and aren't trolling.
posted by BrotherCaine at 2:49 AM on May 25, 2007


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