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I'll trade you a Farrah for a Frampton.
June 18, 2007 11:10 PM   Subscribe

Classic trading card scans from 1930-1980. Okay, I confess, I had some of the Sgt. Pepper's (movie, not album) cards. What young 70s girl didn't swoon over Peter Frampton as Billy Shears (sigh)? A boy down the street from me had most of the Star Wars cards, but I would never trade my Charlies Angels or my Six Million Dollar Man cards with him, although he really wanted Farrah.
posted by amyms (19 comments total) 6 users marked this as a favorite

 
God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, Need'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, Need'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, God'em, Need'em, Need'em.

Many a recess spent. I had Star Wars series one. Though my true passion was hockey cards. Good times. Goes well with this.
posted by srboisvert at 1:38 AM on June 19, 2007


I had a full set of Kiss cards in the late 70s. Wasn't even a fan. WTF?

VFL footy cards were the duck's, however.

49 Ian Cooper, Collingwood was the hardest one to get at my school. Name and card number permanently etched into my brain.

Then all of a sudden, after many months, he'd be in every 4th pack.

I reckon the bastards at Scanlens were dudding us poor kids. Wonder if that still happens?

/still was fun, but.
posted by uncanny hengeman at 3:56 AM on June 19, 2007


I had some of those Six Million Dollar Man cards. Bionic Woman cards, too. Some peeled off to become stickers. They are still stuck to my bedroom door back at my Dad's house.

You know, six million dollars will barely get you a bionic eye nowadays.
posted by Balisong at 5:11 AM on June 19, 2007


I had misread this as "scams" initially. Which was then confirmed by uncanny hengeman's report.
posted by imperium at 5:38 AM on June 19, 2007



I can see some good photoshops coming from these.
posted by fizzix at 6:03 AM on June 19, 2007


One of the great memories from my childhood is the banana flavored gum that came with "Planet of the Apes" cards.
posted by davebush at 6:42 AM on June 19, 2007


You know how smelling a certain smell can evoke a strong memory? I just had that experience looking at these cards. Thank you!
posted by suki at 7:11 AM on June 19, 2007


I'm a little bit too young for this site's cutoff date. These were the cards of my childhood.
posted by Faint of Butt at 7:42 AM on June 19, 2007


The spokes on my tricycle are watching. And waiting.

paperclip standing by!
posted by CynicalKnight at 8:16 AM on June 19, 2007


Were these the cards that each had a piece of a puzzle on the back of them? If so, I wish someone with a complete set would assemble and post a scan.
Do any of you remember the Battlestar Galactica cards? I think they came in packages of Wonder Bread.
posted by Dr. Zira at 10:09 AM on June 19, 2007


I inherited several of the Civil War News cards as a child. Looking back now, I can't believe these were ever meant for children. They are rather violent.

for example
posted by WhipSmart at 10:13 AM on June 19, 2007


I just loved growing up in the 70s!
posted by squalor at 11:05 AM on June 19, 2007


Oh, dear...I bought some of the Sgt. Pepper ones, too, because I thought Paul Nicholas was teh major hotness at the time. I also bought lots of the ones that were a crapshoot between Queen, Kiss, the Village People and the Babys. I was looking for the full Queen set, didn't mind the Kiss cards, but....the Village People?? Ack.
posted by Oriole Adams at 11:12 AM on June 19, 2007


It's strange to think that the R-rated Alien was targeted at kids.
posted by Pastabagel at 11:13 AM on June 19, 2007


I love these! Thank you!! Even though I must admit, I am more of a Garbage Pail Kids era kind of girl!

I agree with the photoshop potential as mentioned by fizzix.
posted by psylosyren at 12:23 PM on June 19, 2007


Some peeled off to become stickers. They are still stuck to my bedroom door back at my Dad's house.

My kids both decorated their bedroom doors with stickers (nothing as cool as the ones from my childhood, though... My daughter has since moved out on her own and she tried to peel some of her favorites off the door to take with her. No luck... Those things will survive a nuclear blast, I'll bet.
posted by amyms at 9:04 PM on June 19, 2007


So... anyone figured out a way to grab these scans without saving them one by one? :-)

I had nearly all the weird wheels, carefully stored in a book, including rare ones worth more than their weight in gold (or better - marbles) at school. Then, naturally, I lost the book. :)
posted by -harlequin- at 2:58 AM on June 20, 2007


I can't believe these were ever meant for children.

I remember the community parents were always up in arms about whatever the trading cards du jour was, trying to enact bans and boycotts and the like.

And I think part of the appeal of the cards was that they sometimes had stuff that was interesting to kids, rather than being entirely stuff that was bland enough to pass the paranoid parenting filter :)
posted by -harlequin- at 3:06 AM on June 20, 2007


My daughter has since moved out on her own and she tried to peel some of her favorites off the door to take with her. No luck... Those things will survive a nuclear blast, I'll bet.

They may survive a nuclear blast but they come off nicely with a good smearing of peanut butter. Even 20 years later. Of course this peanut butter power complicates cold war relations.
posted by srboisvert at 4:40 AM on June 20, 2007


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