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"I could call them Labori, but that strikes me as a bit bookish."
June 24, 2007 7:28 PM   Subscribe

The play R.U.R. (or Rossum's Universal Robots) and the novel The War with the Newts, both by the redoubtable Karel Čapek.
posted by Iridic (8 comments total) 12 users marked this as a favorite

 
CAPEK and RUR: staples of crossword puzzles everywhere. These should be fun to read. Thanks.
posted by painquale at 7:46 PM on June 24, 2007


knowing about it for ages but never having the chance to read r.u.r, I have to say this is just lovely.

what surprises me is the style quite reminds me of saki or wilde, where I was expecting stanislaus lem. superb.
posted by dorian at 8:00 PM on June 24, 2007


I have never been able to read R.U.R. either.

Surreal, but wonderful.
posted by blacklite at 8:21 PM on June 24, 2007


Both are great reads. I'm glad to see them online.
posted by debgpi at 8:38 PM on June 24, 2007


these are two of my all time favourite stories. thanks for spreading to good word.
posted by kendrak at 10:33 PM on June 24, 2007


Yes, thanks! I am an admirer of Čapek.

(And yes, dorian, reminds me of Saki, as well.)
posted by trip and a half at 10:43 PM on June 24, 2007


I was in a production of "R.U.R." in college. I played the Cassandra-ish old-man scientist, even though I looked about 12 at the time. (Hair sprayed silver -- very convincing.) I had the embarassing task of delivering the last line of the play, spoken as a pair of male and female robots seem to have discovered the emotion that we humans call love: "Go, Adam, go Eve -- the world is yours." My friends sat in the audience and jeered at me. That said, there's something appealing -- if overwrought -- about the play.
posted by adgnyc at 7:43 AM on June 25, 2007


The War with the Newts
I can't read that without thinking "Fink-Nottle."
posted by Wolfdog at 7:29 PM on June 25, 2007 [1 favorite]


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