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The "Minutemen" ask if she weighs the same as a duck and wonder if they can build a bridge out of her.
June 30, 2007 1:22 AM   Subscribe

So much for that 300-mile border fence.
posted by orthogonality (111 comments total) 1 user marked this as a favorite

 
Now starting at seeker for the Tricolores de Quidditch...
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 1:29 AM on June 30, 2007


Those wacky Mexicans!
posted by Brittanie at 1:35 AM on June 30, 2007


That is totally not a weather balloon or a kite. It's motion is stable.

The first thing I thought was "unmanned drone."

Then I was like, "no, it's waaay too stable for that." Or for a witch for that matter. Not really organic movement.

My thinking is that the video we're seeing is one of those perspective tricks. We're seeing something close to the ground in the video, and maybe the camera is moving so that it appears the "witch" is moving. But then...

Please someone tell me what this thing is before I go to bed. I'm caught between, "ZOMGS, ALIENS," and "zomgs, really good hoax, how did they do that?"
posted by Mister Cheese at 1:44 AM on June 30, 2007 [1 favorite]


"When it comes to the unknown, anything is possible."

Unless you master your fear, fear will be your master!
posted by ZachsMind at 1:44 AM on June 30, 2007


...whatever. i need another corona
posted by ZachsMind at 1:44 AM on June 30, 2007


Please someone tell me what this thing is before I go to bed.

It looks like something fixed to a zip line.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 1:45 AM on June 30, 2007


ET goes ATVing
posted by caddis at 1:47 AM on June 30, 2007


It looks like something fixed to a zip line.

Like this.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 1:48 AM on June 30, 2007


It does look like it's on a zip line... Just like the flying saucer episode of The Brady Bunch.
posted by amyms at 1:54 AM on June 30, 2007


A zip line would make sense. Resolution of the clip isn't very high, but I guess it'd be difficult enough to see even in clearer video. I need to get more rest.

I guess the big question is why? Why scare people? Just some pranksters, or something more sinister, or... gasp... viral marketeering? Coca Azul???
posted by Mister Cheese at 1:57 AM on June 30, 2007


You have seen this somewhere before.
posted by caddis at 2:00 AM on June 30, 2007


Man, I wish it were aliens for real.

*kicks the ground with tennis shoe*

It's never aliens for real.
posted by Mister Cheese at 2:03 AM on June 30, 2007 [20 favorites]


I guess the big question is why? Why scare people?

Dude, Mexico is a third-world country. They're all about the magical horseshit down there. Jesus in a tortilla, Virgin Mary in your bathroom mirror, UFOs over Mexico City. The country is a target-rich environment for hucksters of all kinds.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 2:04 AM on June 30, 2007


I think it's a leprechaun.
posted by champthom at 2:07 AM on June 30, 2007


The fence is fine. It just means it needs to be backed up with AAA.
posted by Steven C. Den Beste at 2:08 AM on June 30, 2007 [2 favorites]


Es muy fácil — the good sisters of San Tanco are establishing a "pilot" facility in Mexico.
posted by rob511 at 2:09 AM on June 30, 2007


I like that the officer interviewed describes this personthing as having "claws." When I think of witches, that's typically the first thing I imagine.
posted by spiderskull at 2:17 AM on June 30, 2007


I think we're all just inches away from believing in superstitious nonsense. Even those of us in so-called developed countries. All it takes is for enough people to take it seriously, and for a couple of people to claim to have found "proof"...
posted by humblepigeon at 2:18 AM on June 30, 2007


I won't dispute your assertion, Cool Papa Bell, as I know that the images of "la bruja" is woven into the fabric Mexican folklore. But hucksters have to huck something, you know? So who would stand to benefit from fear of the cemetery via supernatural hauntings.

In other words, I'm curious about the personal story of the perpetrators of the hoax. Is it exploitation of third world magical horseshit believers by paternalistic and condescending first world hooligans? Or the more likely huckestering of someone in the city itself that stands to benefit. Anti-witch medallions or potions and the like. Orchestration by the townspeople to draw media attention to the area and perhaps an increase in tourism? Marfa lights, anyone?
posted by Mister Cheese at 2:19 AM on June 30, 2007


This is basically the same thing.
posted by mdonley at 2:19 AM on June 30, 2007


Is this one of those 'flying burrito brothers' I'm always hearing about?
posted by dgaicun at 2:20 AM on June 30, 2007 [1 favorite]


Dude, Mexico is a third-world country. They're all about the magical horseshit down there. Jesus in a tortilla, Virgin Mary in your bathroom mirror, UFOs over Mexico City.

This is not a phenomenon unique to Mexico. Being a third-world country doesn't automatically mean all of its citizens are superstitious, just as being a first-world country doesn't imply the opposite.

Just look at all of the Virgin Mary toasts/trees/shadows/coagulated milk in the US.
posted by spiderskull at 2:21 AM on June 30, 2007 [4 favorites]


In other words, I'm curious about the personal story of the perpetrators of the hoax.

They could just be having fun. Hey look, we're on TV. That sort of thing.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 2:21 AM on June 30, 2007


Cool Papa Bell writes 'Dude, Mexico is a third-world country. They're all about the magical horseshit down there. Jesus in a tortilla, Virgin Mary in your bathroom mirror, UFOs over Mexico City. The country is a target-rich environment for hucksters of all kinds.'

I've got two words for you, Papa Bell. Deepak and Chopra.
posted by PeterMcDermott at 2:34 AM on June 30, 2007 [9 favorites]


I know this has been said before, but I DEMAND to know if there is some kind of Al-Qaeda of Rationality that I can join.

I mean, seriously people, why you even gotta do a thing?
posted by Avenger at 2:34 AM on June 30, 2007


I've got two words for you, Papa Bell. Deepak and Chopra.


Peter McD wins the internet.
posted by Avenger at 2:35 AM on June 30, 2007


This really pisses me off. Supernatural creatures have enough to deal with without having the stereotypes about us confirmed. Cape? Pointy hat? Is this Salem?? COME ON!!
posted by invitapriore at 3:08 AM on June 30, 2007 [1 favorite]


Oh, that's Don Juan! He's at it again, doing his Yaqui thing.

That or a Flying Burrito Brother on a zip line.

Lots of UFO stuff in the news recently. British airline pilot sees mile wide UFO over English channel, two. Another one in England. Salt Lake City.

Most dramatic was the statement by "Isaac" about the UFO sightings in California.
posted by nickyskye at 3:27 AM on June 30, 2007


No way, you're all wrong.

The crotchety old owner of the cemetery dressed up in a pointy hat and wig to scare away the townsfolk, so they wouldn't suspect he was plotting to sell the land where there families are buried to developers for a substantial profit. He would have succeeded, too, if it weren't for you meddling kids.
posted by louche mustachio at 3:27 AM on June 30, 2007 [9 favorites]


Fun with balloons. I do like that the UFO expert appears to have a batshitinsane logo on his shirt.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 3:35 AM on June 30, 2007


I like how they kept referring to the local UFO club for expert opinion. That was some hard-hitting Telemundo journalism right there.
posted by chuckdarwin at 4:14 AM on June 30, 2007 [5 favorites]


I like turtles.
posted by humannaire at 6:10 AM on June 30, 2007


does anyone know what system is being used at 2:48?
posted by spish at 6:15 AM on June 30, 2007


RONALDO WEASLEY! HOW DARE YOU STEAL THAT BROOM? I AM ABSOUTELY DISGUSTED! YOU'RE FATHER'S NOW FACING AN INQUIRY AT WORK, AND IT'S ENTIRELY YOUR FAULT! IF YOU PUT ANOTHER *TOE* OUT OF LINE, WE'LL BRING YOU STRAIGHT HOME! And Guadalupe, dear, congratulations on making it into Leónindor. Your Father and I are so proud.
posted by ND¢ at 6:16 AM on June 30, 2007 [10 favorites]


Twenty five dollars. I have 25 bucks, in my hand, ready to give to the first person to make and ship me a t-shirt that says "local Mexican UFO club."
posted by XQUZYPHYR at 6:17 AM on June 30, 2007


From the shape of the object and the steady movement, I think it's a performer riding a tiny bicycle along a high-wire. Compare the silhouette. An oulandish explanation, but still more likely than witches or aliens.

NB, how come a Google image search for "tiny bicycle", "miniature bicycle" etc. turns up pictures of naked women?
posted by WPW at 6:19 AM on June 30, 2007


Outlandish, not oulandish.
posted by WPW at 6:21 AM on June 30, 2007


Hmm. It looks suspiciously like something filled with helium floating on prevailing air currents. Either that, or what happens when your tonal runs smack dab into your nagual.
posted by gallois at 6:27 AM on June 30, 2007


Ocham's Razor says it's a witch. It really is the simplest explanation. It's a motherfucking witch, yo.
posted by Astro Zombie at 6:33 AM on June 30, 2007 [3 favorites]


I WANT TO BELIEVE
posted by buriednexttoyou at 6:34 AM on June 30, 2007


here i am, i'm an e t complete with martian antennas
posted by pyramid termite at 6:46 AM on June 30, 2007


I don't care how much you first-world, scientific minds poke fun, this kind of stuff makes me glad I'm Mexican. Like a lot of developing countries, superstition and folklore are still very much a part of everyday life in the Mexican cultural experience. I'll take my Virgin Mary tortillas, flying witches, and Chupacabras any day over the dismissive, dry rationalism of the average Mefite.

It's fun, people! Like when you gather around the Ouija board, and you know that fucker Kevin's nudging the planchette to spell out Lucifer, but you go along with it and convince Mary something's moving in her closet. You play along and play along and halfway believe it, 'til the cat jumps out of the closet and you have a big ol' laugh, making sure everybody knows you were never scared, but you still dive under the covers when you get into bed that night. I love that feeling, the thrill of still believing in the supernatural. For a little while you forget about being a rational adult and can work yourself into a tizzy. It's fun!
posted by lychee at 6:55 AM on June 30, 2007 [15 favorites]


Q. What does a warlock pimp say when he gets up in the morning?

A. Where my witches at?!

/I'm so sorry...
//well, not really...
posted by spoobnooble at 6:55 AM on June 30, 2007 [5 favorites]


Q. What does a magician say upon looking into his empty top hat?

A. Witch you better give me my bunny!
posted by ND¢ at 7:07 AM on June 30, 2007 [5 favorites]


Dude, Mexico is a third-world country. They're all about the magical horseshit down there. Jesus in a tortilla, Virgin Mary in your bathroom mirror, UFOs over Mexico City. The country is a target-rich environment for hucksters of all kinds.

Dude, that's an ignorant frickin' thing you've just said. As many others have already pointed out, there's all sorts of superstition and magical thinking horseshit in the developed world.
posted by Ethereal Bligh at 7:09 AM on June 30, 2007


It looked like a dead witch on a Harry Potter vibrating broom.
posted by doctorschlock at 7:10 AM on June 30, 2007


I think we're all just inches away from believing in superstitious nonsense.
Lord forbid.
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 7:21 AM on June 30, 2007 [3 favorites]


The madness of crowds.
posted by Dave Faris at 7:26 AM on June 30, 2007


there's all sorts of superstition and magical thinking horseshit in the developed world

Leprechauns in Mobile, Alabama, to take an instance at random from the very next MeFi post.

I checked out www.snopes.com to see if there was anything about this "witch", and that's always a reminder of how superstition is universal.
posted by WPW at 7:27 AM on June 30, 2007


Clearly what we have going here is some kind of magical realism. My theory is that it's Vincente Fox, soaring above his people by his own force of ancient will before returning to squat in his palace, an aged monster seamed by time but still canny, my own Rosa, still in some glancing shadow the already-tarnishing warrior that in the misguided strength of his arms bayoneted three monkeys in the plaza on that harsh-shadowed afternoon when you lost the first bloom of your heart.
posted by ormondsacker at 7:36 AM on June 30, 2007 [9 favorites]


NB, how come a Google image search for "tiny bicycle", "miniature bicycle" etc. turns up pictures of naked women?

Because it's the internet--anything you search for will, eventually, turn up pictures of naked women.
posted by LooseFilter at 7:40 AM on June 30, 2007 [2 favorites]


Just look at all of the Virgin Mary toast//trees/shadows/coagulated milk in the US.

Just this week in Florida: Woman Sees Virgin Mary in Watermelon.
posted by ericb at 7:42 AM on June 30, 2007


The first thing I thought was "unmanned drone."

Must we go through this again?
posted by squalor at 7:42 AM on June 30, 2007 [2 favorites]


::Witch you better give me my bunny!::

I laughed out loud.
posted by Hands of Manos at 7:46 AM on June 30, 2007


Here are the ground rules for claiming proof of extraordinary phenomena in 2007.
posted by dgaicun at 8:00 AM on June 30, 2007 [1 favorite]


Someone in Mexico scraped together the $250K.
posted by jimmythefish at 8:05 AM on June 30, 2007


Mexico has a seriously enthusiastic UFO culture. The first time I visited (and not in a typical tourist place, a rural village near Veracruz that had just become known for a bird migration phenomenon) I was surprised to see at this small village news stand multiple entire magazines devoted to UFO sightings and abductions.

I suppose this is a way to be more modern while still enjoying the frisson of spookiness that the old legends produced, as lychee suggests.
posted by localroger at 8:30 AM on June 30, 2007


Great video, thanks for the posting.

Do remember that educated observers do see things that are very hard to explain.

That said, this video looks like a clever hoax. It simply looks too much like a cartoon witch perched on a broom.

If it were a hoax, I'd suggest a zipline like some of you said. However, it can't be a person -- the thickness of the line required to carry a person that far would be substantial, you'd have to see it. I'd suggest that it's some sort of low-weight construction, perhaps 10-20 pound in weight, and that it rides down the line, perhaps on a wheel, inside the body of the item, with a weight below it to keep it stable.

It's still pretty good. If you designed it according to my theory, you'd expect it to rock from side to side a little as it went. If there were any wind at all, it'd catch it and rock even more. You really see none or very little of that...
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 8:48 AM on June 30, 2007


Metafilter: Here I am, I'm an E.T. complete with Martian antennas!
posted by forallmankind at 8:49 AM on June 30, 2007


I am naming my next band "Local Mexican UFO Club"!
posted by AccordionGuy at 8:52 AM on June 30, 2007


On preview, it actually could be a jetpack, see this video.

I'd still lean towards the "model on a wire" theory because you don't get much time aloft on a jetpack.
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 8:53 AM on June 30, 2007 [1 favorite]


Or it could be this sort of joke...
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 9:02 AM on June 30, 2007


“Dude, Mexico is a third-world country. They're all about the magical horseshit down there. Jesus in a tortilla, Virgin Mary in your bathroom mirror, UFOs over Mexico City. The country is a target-rich environment for hucksters of all kinds.”

LOLMexicans? Really?

Would donating your balls to a comet count as magical horseshit, or do we call it something else in the developed world?
posted by EatTheWeak at 9:04 AM on June 30, 2007 [1 favorite]


Mexicans might have their primitive superstitious beliefs but unlike the US they don't actually start wars about them.
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 9:06 AM on June 30, 2007 [1 favorite]


¡Ella me hizo en un axolotl!
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 9:22 AM on June 30, 2007


As many others have already pointed out, there's all sorts of superstition and magical thinking horseshit in the developed world.

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED
posted by ROU_Xenophobe at 9:23 AM on June 30, 2007


lupus, those stories from your link remind me of one I read, which I unfortunately can't find right now, of a woman seeing a flying saucer with the letters "UFO" written on the sides.
posted by Snyder at 9:31 AM on June 30, 2007


It's a streetlight.
posted by furiousxgeorge at 9:36 AM on June 30, 2007


lupus_yonderboy: "Great video, thanks for the posting.

If it were a hoax, I'd suggest a zipline like some of you said. However, it can't be a person -- the thickness of the line required to carry a person that far would be substantial, you'd have to see it.
"

I disagree. It could easily be a human load on a zip line. If that object is the size of a human it could be a quarter of a mile away from the camera, and 1/4" wire rope could be very difficult to see from that range and quite capable of carrying a human load. If you really want to pull it off and don't concern yourself with saftey factor you could even pull it off with 1/8"
posted by MrBobaFett at 9:38 AM on June 30, 2007


One of the very interesting things about UFOology is stories from multiple witnesses reporting details like that which they themselves know are stupid.

A favorite of mine is two men who reported that an man in a spacesuit came out of a flying ship and asked them what time it was. "2:30," they said. "You lie, it is 4 o'clock," said the "man," and left -- but it was in fact 2:30. They both reported this and of course people in their small town were skeptical but they stuck to their guns -- even though it was clear that they felt themselves pretty stupid reporting this.

The question is -- why would you make this up -- particularly in a small town where you had to live with the people there for the rest of your life? (Not that I think this proves anything at all of course -- but it's a strange story anyway...)
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 9:42 AM on June 30, 2007 [2 favorites]


I disagree. It could easily be a human load on a zip line. If that object is the size of a human it could be a quarter of a mile away from the camera, and 1/4" wire rope could be very difficult to see from that range and quite capable of carrying a human load. If you really want to pull it off and don't concern yourself with saftey factor you could even pull it off with 1/8"
Good points, but consider the length of such a wire -- it's got to be a half a mile long from several of the shots. If you make something very light, you can simply use a couple of strands of monofilament fishing line on a track... and afterwards you can just cut it -- but wire rope would be heavy bulk and expensive in that length.

And there are few if any advantages to using a human over a model.

One of them would be that the human could move, obviously be animate -- but we don't see ANY movement in the videos. I mean, if you were sliding down a wire, terrorizing the natives, wouldn't you want to make threatening gestures? I know I would!
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 9:57 AM on June 30, 2007


All amusing anecdotes about a culture's relative superstitious nature aside, it's a bunch of balloons.

And the cops are either in on it, very susceptible to the power of suggestion, or should be tested for drugs. I'm leaning towards the middle one. They got spooked, the were talking to one another about what they thought they saw and then, in a situation of heightened stress, they saw what they were just talking about.

This sort of thing happens with you humans all the time.
posted by quin at 10:02 AM on June 30, 2007 [1 favorite]


Well, waddya know. Somebody's remade Gisele Kerozene.
posted by Smart Dalek at 10:15 AM on June 30, 2007 [2 favorites]


Quin nails it: "it's a bunch of balloons"

Yes. Perfect. Accounts for everything, particularly the smoothness. I knew I recognized that sort of motion from somewhere...

A very successful prank!
posted by lupus_yonderboy at 10:15 AM on June 30, 2007


Swamp gas.
posted by jfuller at 10:25 AM on June 30, 2007


My theory is that it's Vincente Fox, soaring above his people by his own force of ancient will before returning to squat in his palace, an aged monster seamed by time but still canny, my own Rosa, still in some glancing shadow the already-tarnishing warrior that in the misguided strength of his arms bayoneted three monkeys in the plaza on that harsh-shadowed afternoon when you lost the first bloom of your heart.

Yeeeessss.... that's the stuff. *rummages in bookshelf for Marquez*
posted by jokeefe at 10:47 AM on June 30, 2007


I think quin got it right. If you look at the very beginning of the video you can see what appears to be a person on the ground at the far left, in a perfect position to release a bunch of balloons with fabric draped over them.
posted by LeeJay at 11:05 AM on June 30, 2007


Where's the Scooby gang when you need them?
posted by effwerd at 11:10 AM on June 30, 2007


This is basically the same thing.

Are the only voice actors in Mexico culled from game shows, or is it just a coincidence?
posted by Uther Bentrazor at 11:11 AM on June 30, 2007


"...the thickness of the line required to carry a person that far would be substantial, you'd have to see it."

You can't always see the zip line, depending on the angle. (Warning : Dumb people die in this video)
posted by Liosliath at 11:26 AM on June 30, 2007


Seriously though Mexican prank people...a witch? Riding a broom? Aren't we kind of scraping the bottom of the monster barrel here? I think, as a rule of thumb, if a monster has been featured in the title of an Abbott and Costello movie all of its possible scariness and intrigue have been erased forever.

I can see how local legends can still legitimately tap into local emotions, but after generations of pop cultural imagining and Halloween commercialization, the folk credibility of a green, wart-nose, pointy-hat, broomstick witch should be about on par with a Count Chocula.
posted by dgaicun at 11:26 AM on June 30, 2007


You know what I just realized? It's not a witch or a zip line. IT'S GREG BRADY PLAYING A TRICK ON MEXICO.

Mystery solved! ¡Es tiempo del tequila!
posted by miss lynnster at 11:40 AM on June 30, 2007


Yeah, ormondsacker has it.

I cracked up when the astronomer put the antennae on and claimed to be an ET though.
posted by hattifattener at 11:52 AM on June 30, 2007


balloon
posted by mr.marx at 12:33 PM on June 30, 2007


Oooo, that's pretty interesting, mr.marx. Full length video with audio from the people taping it. Seems there's a great deal of speculation, but probably can be summed up with:

"this is not a bird we're seeing, it's a balloon,"

"it's big!"

and

"it's a horse that flies!"

The people video taping don't seemed frightened at all. Initially they're speculative as they try to spot the thing, then the woman in the tape declares it's just a balloon, and the jokes come out near the end.

This gives me some ideas, though :P
posted by Mister Cheese at 12:49 PM on June 30, 2007


Seriously though Mexican prank people...a witch? Riding a broom? Aren't we kind of scraping the bottom of the monster barrel here?

Doubling back with my comments above ... I just don't think you guys understand the cultural climate to Mexico. You can snark at me with Deepak Chopra, Leprechauns in Alabama and Heaven's Gate and whatnot. But you're missing the larger point that Mexico is a profoundly rural, magically religious country. The ground is fertile for hucksterism to a far, far greater degree than the U.S. and the U.K. I mean, it's not even close. Saying, "hey Americans believe stupid shit, too" simply fails to grasp the astonishing amount of magical belief in a country like Mexico.

Call me shortsighted, whatever, I don't care. Don't miss the forest for the trees.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 12:51 PM on June 30, 2007


Did anyone else hear part of the X-files theme at about 2:07 into the clip?
posted by hector horace at 12:53 PM on June 30, 2007


Mister Cheese: "It's never aliens for real."

*kicks the ground with tennis shoe*

Word.

I hope to be alive when it's not a false alarm. I believe in the possibility of non-terrestial life. However, I am also a strong believer in Drake's Equation, and the odds of non-terrestrial life ever finding this little spitball in space are not very good.

According to Isaac Asimov, there's a mathematical near-certainty that as you read these words, out in space there are a bare conservative minimum of thirty communicative, space-faring civilizations which are close enough to our perception of sentient life to be of mutual value. Frank Drake's own calculations were far more idealistic: ten thousand sentient non-terrestrial lifeforms in the Milky Way.

The Milky Way Galaxy contains approximately 200 billion stars.

You'd have a better chance finding one bone needle in a couple thousand haystacks.
posted by ZachsMind at 1:17 PM on June 30, 2007


communicative, as in "able to communicate" not as in "diseased" or something. =P
posted by ZachsMind at 1:18 PM on June 30, 2007


Oh man, someone already beat me to my idea.

Also, I think the amount of magical belief in Mexico is only astonishing if you aren't familiar with its cultural inheritance of indigenous and Catholic beliefs. Coming from more secularized backgrounds, it's easy to dismiss these beliefs and go LOLMexicans. I feel, however, that this is a disservice to the experience of those in fear and even to those perpetrating the hoax. The involvement of the police is very interesting, not to mention the media.

So the approach I'd take, once again, is why? Especially given the casual tone of the viewers in the unedited videotape. There were no cries of witch within, no real fear. Someone decided to take, it though, and run with it. And of course, it's the people within the culture that know best how something of supernatural nature will be received. So there's intent behind making this available to the media. It may be just a bunch of attention grabbing, but then look, we're discussing it here on Metafilter, no?

I'll ask my pa if he saw anything on the way back up from Michoacan. :)
posted by Mister Cheese at 1:20 PM on June 30, 2007


I think the amount of magical belief in Mexico is only astonishing if you aren't familiar with its cultural inheritance of indigenous and Catholic beliefs.

Oh, totally agreed there. I think what's astonishing is that the country could be literally next door to the U.S. and its colossal media machine and still retain its level and particular flavor of magical belief. I think that speaks more to the level of governmental corruption within Mexico, that it is still economically backward, and has not raised its educational levels. Compare Mexico to the other next-door neighbor, Canada, and the difference is astonishing.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 1:30 PM on June 30, 2007


EatTheWeak, that site you linked to about the balls tried to install system doctor.
posted by IronLizard at 1:32 PM on June 30, 2007


I bet those witches make a kickass mole sauce.
posted by jefbla at 1:47 PM on June 30, 2007


If they were witches, they wouldn't make a mole sauce, they'd make a mole sauce. Or perhaps in this case it'd be an otter sauce.
posted by Zack_Replica at 2:21 PM on June 30, 2007


A flying witch with thriller sound.
posted by phoque at 2:32 PM on June 30, 2007


Though it could have been ... a lawnmower.
posted by phoque at 2:36 PM on June 30, 2007


That particular TV "news" show is not the most serious, respected, or reliable, to put it mildly.

Also, beware that the translations and summary on the video site are blatantly incorrect. This wasn't in a "remote town", when the subtitles are saying "remote town", the presenter woman is actually saying "city". This is in Monterrey, Mexico's third biggest city, and a center of industry and business in the North.
posted by Joakim Ziegler at 2:38 PM on June 30, 2007


It's strange to see him in Mexico but it's obviously CELEDON.
posted by radiobishop at 3:02 PM on June 30, 2007


That was incredible. I couldn't stop laughing. I love a well engineered prank but the Isaac link that Nickyskye posted was just amazing. Check the documents at the upper right...that launguage primer is awesome.
posted by Mcable at 5:50 PM on June 30, 2007


I am seconding dgaicun's suggestion about ground rules for evidence. Crappy video, so I'm not squandering away any further fractions of my life on this.
posted by hodyoaten at 8:42 PM on June 30, 2007


That would take about 4 minutes to make in Premiere or whatever.
Next.
posted by signal at 10:04 PM on June 30, 2007


And to all the people trotting out their 'Spanish' (to use the term loosely) or their 'funny' (ditto) stereotypes about Mexico, please don't. It's embarrassing.
posted by signal at 10:08 PM on June 30, 2007


What are the business ethics of a viral marketing scheme that involves bribery of police officials to make false statements? Well, it might make a good story.
posted by iamck at 11:26 PM on June 30, 2007


This has been thoroughly debunked. It's not a witch. It's Cory Doctorow's Balloon.
posted by mmoncur at 11:33 PM on June 30, 2007


Ironlizard - !!! Oh, crap. Sorry about that.

... wonder how nervous I should be about not noticing anything when I clicked it earlier?

Apologies all around for the tainted link, my friends.
posted by EatTheWeak at 8:31 AM on July 1, 2007


[removed the link from EtW's comment]
posted by jessamyn at 8:49 AM on July 1, 2007


No worries, after the first time it happened I tried to get it to do it again with firebug open just to get a look at what code was called, but it wouldn't do it (with those msgboxes, you can't get the browser to do anything until you close them). It may have been code from one of the rotating ads displayed and not necessarily the site itself (it had a heck of a lot of popups/banners plastered on it).
posted by IronLizard at 9:01 PM on July 1, 2007


I grew up a half hour from Mexico & am a quarter Spanish. My family makes tamales for Christmas. So my sucky Spanish will not be silenced, ese.
posted by miss lynnster at 9:15 PM on July 1, 2007


there's all sorts of superstition and magical thinking horseshit in the developed world.

*cough*Iraqi nukes*cough*
posted by octobersurprise at 7:06 AM on July 2, 2007


there's all sorts of superstition and magical thinking horseshit in the developed world.

*cough*Iraqi nukes*cough*


Speaking of Iraq and magical beliefs... We all know how this turned out, but for a while there...

Even on the run, Hussein has Iraqis under his 'spell'

By James Hider | Special to The Christian Science Monitor
BAGHDAD – As US forces rolled into Baghdad, Saddam Hussein, the Ace of Spades in the US Army's deck of cards of wanted Iraqis, did a spectacular vanishing act. Many Iraqis believe their former leader, a lifelong dabbler in the occult, will never be found by coalition troops scouring the country. His trick, they say, is a magic stone that protects him from harm.

Mr. Hussein and his inner circle were obsessed with the dark arts: his son Uday even advertised on his own television channel for those with supernatural powers to come forward and serve the ruling family. In a country where decades of isolation and repression have cut people off from the modern world, belief in the occult is commonplace, and Iraqis regularly consult soothsayers to find stolen cars or tackle mental illness. Many believe Hussein has shrouded himself in his dark powers.

"Saddam never takes any step unless he consults with his magician advisers. I'm sure he has two or three with him now," says Qassem Ali, an electrician in Baghdad.

"He brought them in from China and Japan because he wanted specialists," says colleague Ali Mahdi. As they talked, a crowd gathered around to earnestly chip in their stories about Hussein's supernatural prowess.

"Saddam is indestructible because of these powers," Mr. Mahdi insists. Such a belief, widely but by no means universally held here, has contributed to the atmosphere of fear and mistrust that is hindering coalition attempts to rebuild the country.

Coalition leaders admit that a key to convincing Iraqis that the old regime is dead is capturing or killing the bogeyman who still casts a long shadow over Iraq.

The most commonly held view in Baghdad is that Hussein wore a "magic" stone around his neck, which warded off assassins' bullets.

"It's all true about the magic stone," says car dealer Mokhaled Mohammed, sitting in a cafe on Baghdad's upmarket Arasat Street. "First of all, he put it on a chicken and tried to shoot it. Then he put it on a cow, and the bullets went around it."

posted by Cool Papa Bell at 10:41 AM on July 2, 2007


His trick, they say, is a magic stone that protects him from harm.

I gotcher magic stones right here. Meanwhile, speaking of Saddam and magic, some people believe in astrology; some people still believe in those nukes.
posted by octobersurprise at 7:19 PM on July 2, 2007


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