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Fasting for Dubya.
March 15, 2001 11:19 AM   Subscribe

Fasting for Dubya. And y'all thought the bit about the Britney Spears novel was scarifying? Whoa.
posted by raysmj (40 comments total)

 
I personally wish regularly that all of the great wisdom of humanity should dawn in Dubya's mind... although, I think my motivation is different than these folks'.
posted by mblandi at 12:37 PM on March 15, 2001


I first read this as "Fisting for Dubya". Talk about scarifying...
posted by MrBaliHai at 1:36 PM on March 15, 2001


MrBaliHai: Thanks. And the Sominex Corp. will thank you for making me take three more this evening.
posted by raysmj at 2:28 PM on March 15, 2001


Make sure you read how it works. No, really, there's more to it than just not eating.
posted by dhartung at 2:29 PM on March 15, 2001


Christians are called to pray for those in leadership over them. They are also called to fast. Corporate fasting and prayer for any number of things is time-honoured and longstanding. Why is it so odd that there might be a concerted effort to do so now, especially for a leader who professes born-again Christianity for himself? It makes perfect sense.

It's starting to become distressing to see how often people of faith are being mocked for normal expressions of their faith; especially Christians.
posted by Dreama at 2:45 PM on March 15, 2001


I've never known a Christian who fasted, actually. I always thought that was more an Islam thing.
posted by kindall at 2:56 PM on March 15, 2001


Hey Dreama: I grew up Baptist in rural Mississippi. I knew plenty of conservative Presbyterians, of the ilk who sponsored this site. I never heard of anyone, especially anyone describing themselves as "born again," say they were fasting for a president. Serious born-again folks wouldn't make a public effort of it either, or put up a pic of Dubya with a soft-focus border either, as if here a saint. This is a whole new thing.
posted by raysmj at 3:01 PM on March 15, 2001


JC 'imself fasted at times.

I wouldn't say it's common, but it's definately not unknown, either. Some folks swear by it.
posted by sonofsamiam at 3:01 PM on March 15, 2001


Dreama, that is so true, unfortunantely christians are the one acceptable group left to hate and it's politically correct okay in today's culture.
posted by PrivateParts at 3:01 PM on March 15, 2001


His Holiness? I assume that's not a title.

I just get the feeling that the effort is somehow linked to "May God's name be lifted up by this Presidency" not during.

I also wonder why the commitment is only until Bush's term is up.
posted by mblandi at 3:02 PM on March 15, 2001


mblandi, your nitpicking sematics in the guise intellectualism
poorly diguises your intended barb against Christians... bigot
posted by PrivateParts at 3:36 PM on March 15, 2001


PP, did you come here just to pick fights?
posted by Avogadro at 3:42 PM on March 15, 2001


Hey Dreama: I grew up Baptist in rural Mississippi. I knew plenty of conservative Presbyterians, of the ilk who sponsored this site. I never heard of anyone, especially anyone describing themselves as "born again," say they were fasting for a president. Serious born-again folks wouldn't make a public effort of it either, or put up a pic of Dubya with a soft-focus border either, as if here a saint. This is a whole new thing.

Hey raysmj, so your limited experience is supposed to define who christians can and cannot fast for and where they can and cannot do it, when did these rules go into effect, Adolph?


posted by PrivateParts at 3:44 PM on March 15, 2001


Excuse me, PrivateParts? What on Earth are you talking about? I think the key there was my stating that they don't usually go public. Anything else you conjecture about me is . . . well, projection.
posted by raysmj at 4:14 PM on March 15, 2001


my first thought was wishing some of these people would fast for several months straight, we'd all be a lot better off.
posted by DiplomaticImmunity at 4:19 PM on March 15, 2001


Also, didn't say anyone could or couldn't do anything they wanted. Troll alert!
posted by raysmj at 4:20 PM on March 15, 2001


You're right dhartung, the whole schtick is apparently a email based political pressure generator. They don't exactly say this, but the implication is that they'll be sending Dubya (or the whitehouse anyway) an email listing the numbers and names of people fasting for the president on any one day.

While not overtly politically slanted, it certainly reminds him that the Christian voters of the nation are paying attention, and willing to make sacrifices.

Maybe I'll put together a Breathing-for-Bush site with similar intentions...
posted by daver at 4:40 PM on March 15, 2001


I think I'll start Drinking for Bush, to offset the fact that it's only a matter of time before the first real crisis sends him to the Oval Office liquor cabinet.
posted by holgate at 5:18 PM on March 15, 2001


Why stop at drinking? I've got an idea that virtually guarantees I'll get laid at least once a month. Hell, why limit it to once a month?

Hail to the Chief, baby.
posted by kindall at 5:22 PM on March 15, 2001


I too have started my own prgram for this administration. It's called Trolling for Bush. For today's installment I will call people bigots and compare them to Hitler, in an ironic attempt to silence opinions different than my own.
posted by donkeymon at 6:54 PM on March 15, 2001


How about taking a dump for Bush? I'd do it. =P
posted by PWA_BadBoy at 7:52 PM on March 15, 2001


4bush.com is taken.
4dubya, however, is avaliable.
posted by evad at 8:39 PM on March 15, 2001




just closing the tag, carry on (except PP, who's a total troll)
posted by jpoulos at 8:39 PM on March 15, 2001


donkeymon, PWA BadBoy, thank goodness I wasn't drinking anything when I scrolled down to your posts, or my monitor would be dripping.
posted by lia at 8:40 PM on March 15, 2001


What if I pray that Dubya reaches heaven really soon? Does that count?
posted by solistrato at 9:06 PM on March 15, 2001


I just got laid off today. Another web designer done gone, I'm afraid.

Therefore, in an effort to increase my "holiness" (recruiters are looking for that nowadays), I hereby launch the Fast for Dave initiative: Please send all food you would have eaten (non perishables, if you don't mind) my way. Thanks! My prayers are with all of you!
posted by aladfar at 9:36 PM on March 15, 2001


I'll just point out that I am a Christian, that in fact I am a Baptist and therefore technically born again, that in my church people have chosen to fast for Lent, people I respect greatly, and I wouldn't mock them at all. And I still thought this was silly.

Fasting is an utterly personal expression of faith; to make it a website, to make it an e-mail campaign, especially one with political overtones -- I find that crass. And I will freely mock it.
posted by dhartung at 10:16 PM on March 15, 2001


solistrato: the secret service knock at your door yet?
;)
posted by pnevares at 10:20 PM on March 15, 2001


Christians are called to pray for those in leadership over them. They are also called to fast. Corporate fasting and prayer for any number of things is time-honoured and longstanding. Why is it so odd that there might be a concerted effort to do so now, especially for a leader who professes born-again Christianity for himself? It makes perfect sense.

What's strange here isn't so much that people are fasting; if they were fasting for world peace or a little girl stuck in a well, then fasting could be seen as an expression of love or faith. The issue is that they're fasting for a politician. While they're presumably not fasting for the tax cut, it doesn't seem as spiritual.
posted by Loudmax at 11:26 PM on March 15, 2001


Bravo, dhartung.

Oh, and Dreama, I will speculate that the current trend to mock and ridicule much of Christianity is due in no small part to the couple thousand years of atrocities performed by Christians on everyone that was different than they. Karma may not be instant, but it's hard to deny.

True Christians -- the ones who really want to be Christ-like -- are fine with me. But I just don't see many of them.
posted by goto11 at 6:59 AM on March 16, 2001


Don't be silly PP. I am not intolerant of Christianity. I think that all the doctrine about peace, not killing people, and love, is really wonderful, and very helpful to many.

I think this kind of political stuff -- trying to make Dubbaya holy and "our kind of guy"-- will only hurt Christianity's reputation more than it has been already.
posted by mblandi at 7:43 AM on March 16, 2001


Episcopalians pray for the president by name every Sunday no matter who it is. We spent the last 8 years praying for William and will spend the next 4 praying for George (althought I'd be surprised if there aren't a few rascally liturgists who lead their congregations in praying for Dubya).
posted by straight at 7:46 AM on March 16, 2001


Gee, Scottkramer, I didn't realise that you were G-d, who saw and judged the hearts of all and could determine who was and was not a "true" anything.

I've clearly been worshiping the wrong guy! How could I have been so wrong?
posted by Dreama at 9:19 AM on March 16, 2001


I think we'd all be doing better work by fasting for the Dow Jones Industrial Average ... before we end up in a soup kitchen, and starving the old-fashioned way.
posted by crunchland at 10:05 AM on March 16, 2001


Dreama, I would say that scottkramer probably says he doesn't see too many true Christians around because he sees self-proclaimed Christians acting in non-Christ-like fashion. That's how I feel too.

Oh, but wait - you knew that's what he meant, didn't you? You're a smart lady. You're just being your usual defensive, snarky self.

Whatever.
posted by acridrabbit at 11:04 AM on March 16, 2001


Yeah, we don't tolerate no snark on metafilter.
posted by sonofsamiam at 11:11 AM on March 16, 2001


Gee, Scottkramer, I didn't realise [sic] that you were G-d

Scottkramer is secretly George dubya? Wow.

I agree with what you're saying about karma, Scott. A lot of Christians would just as soon forget all of the people who were killed or otherwise hurt in the name of Christianity.

On the other hand, if you don't see many true Christians, it's more likely because the Christians who are visible in the media (i.e., the ones pursuing a political agenda that I, and presumably you, don't agree with) are not representative of Christians as a whole.

I grew up in the Southern Baptist church, and my experience of christians is that, like everyone else, they come to church to worship and for a sense of community. Most don't care much about politics, and most are very kind people.

That said, I have noticed a few of the judgmental Christian types around here, but, again, they're more visible because they're judgmental. They appear to have forgotten Christ's admonition: let he who is without sin cast the first stone.

But that doesn't mean that we heathens should cast stones either.

posted by anapestic at 11:29 AM on March 16, 2001


Judgmental Christians are no different than judgmental atheists or Buddhists or Maoists or Mac vs. PC flamers. They're all annoying because they're zealots who feel the need to preach their particular brand of gospel. They deserve all the mockery they open themselves up to.

There's a lot of "true" Christians around who simply don't feel the need to advertise it at large. Live and let live.
posted by Skot at 11:47 AM on March 16, 2001


Please do NOT fast for the stock market. In fact, the best thing you could do is go out and buy lots of food. Now that I think about it, go ahead and fast, but please buy up as many routers as possible. I hear Cisco's really hurting.
posted by daver at 11:49 AM on March 16, 2001


I didn't realise that you were G-d, who saw and judged the hearts of all and could determine who was and was not a "true" anything.

I think there was a guy once who said something like, "By their fruits ye shall know them," which would seem to apply here...
posted by kindall at 3:21 PM on March 16, 2001


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