Oh, deer
October 20, 2007 1:29 PM   Subscribe

Oh, deer. "The catching was slow and they looked back to check their lines. They saw what appeared to be a seal with its snout out of the water, but they didn't think any seals were around their fishing grounds and they kept watching."
posted by mr_crash_davis (73 comments total) 1 user marked this as a favorite

 
Likely chased by dogs.
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 1:38 PM on October 20, 2007


Before we left, I looked him in the eye and said 'See you on opening day; payback time.'

I'm surprised the guy didn't just shoot him there in the water.
posted by item at 1:38 PM on October 20, 2007 [2 favorites]


Does it make me an asshole to hate this guy? It sounds like he decided to rescue the deer because he had nothing better to do.
posted by floam at 1:47 PM on October 20, 2007


Does it make me an asshole to hate this guy?

Yes. What the hell are you talking about?
posted by languagehat at 1:50 PM on October 20, 2007 [5 favorites]


Christ, guy saves dear, but you hate him because he didn't do it for the right reasons?

What would those have been?

What does it matter?
posted by 517 at 1:52 PM on October 20, 2007


I assume what floam is referring to is the fact that the guy basically gave his reason for helping the deer as "the fish weren't biting." I found it kind of strange too, but hey, he rescued a deer and put himself at a fair amount of risk to do so.
posted by DMan at 2:00 PM on October 20, 2007


so weird--how did it have the strength to stay afloat? (or are deer natural floaters or something? I'd think it would have to dogpaddle or something)
posted by amberglow at 2:01 PM on October 20, 2007


Cool story, crash - how surreal would that be, to find a deer out in the ocean. I hope the poor thing survived!
posted by madamjujujive at 2:04 PM on October 20, 2007


This story broke on 'The Magical Disney Forums'? Really??

God bless the internet.
posted by skammer at 2:08 PM on October 20, 2007 [2 favorites]


So, can he now hold his arms apart and go: "It was thiiiiiis big, I swear to god."
posted by quin at 2:11 PM on October 20, 2007 [2 favorites]


"so weird--how did it have the strength to stay afloat? (or are deer natural floaters or something? I'd think it would have to dogpaddle or something)"

Deer are quite good swimmers. One winter when I was a kid, out fishing on Flaming Gorge with my dad, in the middle of the gorge we saw a deer just paddling away, headed for the other side. Now, that's no mile-and-a-half, but it's a long swim and awfully cold, especially in the winter.
posted by mr_crash_davis at 2:12 PM on October 20, 2007


Deer are quite good swimmers.

oh--i had no idea--i never think of them as being water-friendly (probably because their legs look so spindly--I only know deer from tv/movies and zoos tho)

I guess the currents probably helped push it out to sea too.
posted by amberglow at 2:17 PM on October 20, 2007


Yes. What the hell are you talking about?

Languagehat: The guy basically said he planned on shotting the deer once it was legal, or something.

"Too weak to stand, he just sat there quivering. We picked him up again and put his feet underneath him, but he still couldn't walk or stand. We left him sitting there looking at us. Before we left, I looked him in the eye and said 'See you on opening day; payback time.'

I mean, Wtf?
posted by delmoi at 2:34 PM on October 20, 2007 [1 favorite]


'See you on opening day; payback time.'

I mean, Wtf?


Make the guy a lifeguard, and I think I have my NaNoWriMo plot set. Er, locked and loaded.
posted by dreamsign at 2:43 PM on October 20, 2007


So, this guy loves nature, but in a different way, so we should condemn him. While hunters have been responsible for enormous travesties against the environment, hunters have also been responsible for some of the best ecological conservation.
posted by agentofselection at 2:48 PM on October 20, 2007


hunters have also been responsible for some of the best ecological conservation.

For instance?
posted by Mr_Zero at 3:01 PM on October 20, 2007


What delmoi clarified upon, guy sounds like a shitheel.

And plus, y'know, he owns a boat.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 3:04 PM on October 20, 2007


i was really hesitant to click on the link--i thought it was going to have a completely different ending. one with deer steaks for dinner or something. i'm quite relieved. and i think it's a fabulous story.

fwiw, i read the "Since the fish weren't biting," and 'See you on opening day; payback time' as an attempt at wit. but then, i am pretty gullible.
posted by msconduct at 3:06 PM on October 20, 2007


mr zero, there's always ducks unlimited and other organizations that want to keep the wild as wild as possible, if only so they'll have more animals to kill.
posted by msconduct at 3:07 PM on October 20, 2007


I think that this is a bit of a hoax - I've seen these pictures elsewhere.

Looks like an endangered Key Deer (found in a couple of spots in the Florida Keys) and they cannot be hunted.
posted by cinemafiend at 3:08 PM on October 20, 2007


Deer are quite good swimmers.
Yep, something similar happened near where I live a while ago.
posted by punilux at 3:11 PM on October 20, 2007


hunters have also been responsible for some of the best ecological conservation.

>For instance?



Ducks Unlimited
's wetland conservation work comes to mind.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 3:13 PM on October 20, 2007


Mr_Zero writes "For instance?"

Theodore Roosevelt was a fanatical hunter and also highly respectable for his conservation efforts.
posted by mullingitover at 4:12 PM on October 20, 2007


AFAIK, nearly every dollar spent on state and federal duck stamps (hunting permits, basically) gets spent on wetlands and habitat conservation and acquisition. I don't hunt ducks, but I do like to visit places like the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge, which hosts a huge population of migrating birds, including the largest number of wintering bald eagles in the lower 48.

Everyone's getting duck stamps in the xmas stockings this year!
posted by rtha at 4:13 PM on October 20, 2007


This story didn't break on that forum. I've seen these pictures before, a while back. I doubt the story is true either.
posted by puke & cry at 4:14 PM on October 20, 2007


It dates back to June apparently. FWIW Snopes lists it as true, and traces it to the Marykand Gazette.
posted by Flitcraft at 4:32 PM on October 20, 2007


damn typo - Maryland.
posted by Flitcraft at 4:34 PM on October 20, 2007


This story broke on 'The Magical Disney Forums'? Really??

No. There is a clear attribution at the bottom:

Source: Burton, Bill. "Oh Deer, What a Fishing Expedition on Bay."
Maryland Gazette; June 13th, 2007.


If you search the Maryland Gazette archives you will find that story, although it doesn't let you read it without a subscription.
posted by D.C. at 4:36 PM on October 20, 2007


Ah and this chap called the original reporter and checked it out.
posted by Flitcraft at 4:39 PM on October 20, 2007


Mr_Zero: In my area Wild Turkey have been, basically, "extinct" for decades without hunters we would have none.

They were brought back to hunt but great restrictions are placed (by the hunters and law) on how many are bagged.

In fact as a non-hunter I would say that hunters are some of the most nature respecting people nowadays. I don't hunt but I have a bunch of respect for modern hunters. Even though the Turkeys scare the hell out of me. Especially during Turkey "love" season
posted by mrgroweler at 4:45 PM on October 20, 2007


Dammit, that link worked for me and then suddenly disappeared behind a registration screen! It was checked by Mike Desotell at the Eagle Herald

My next call was to Bill Burton, the Maryland reporter who broke the original story and he assured me of its authenticity.

The 81-year-old veteran newsman was quite amused with the e-mail version that was circulating here in Marinette/Menominee.

In Burton's article, Bo looked the deer in the eye before leaving and said, "See you on opening day; payback time."

posted by Flitcraft at 4:46 PM on October 20, 2007


"Too weak to stand, he just sat there quivering. We picked him up again and put his feet underneath him, but he still couldn't walk or stand. We left him sitting there looking at us. Before we left, I looked him in the eye and said 'See you on opening day; payback time.'

I mean, Wtf?


Gee, of course that couldn't have been, like, a joke or anything. Naah, he must be a deer-hating sonofabitch who went to all the trouble of saving this deer just so he could shoot it later. Yeah, that's the ticket.
posted by languagehat at 4:58 PM on October 20, 2007 [2 favorites]


Or he could be some dude who was worried his friends'd tease him for saving Bambi, so he tried to establish his manliness by making a lame hunting joke.

Sadly, until we all become level 12 telepaths, we'll never really know.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 5:27 PM on October 20, 2007


I'm sad that they didn't give it any water and some vegetation to munch on. If it had been swimming all night it was probably very dehydrated and hungry. Not much use if it dies right there on the beach because it can't move from exhaustion.
posted by wires at 5:35 PM on October 20, 2007


And what "horrible ecological devastation" are hunters supposedly responsible for? Leaving beer cans around? Shooting animals they weren't supposed to shoot? Ok, but compare that to say... logging. Or mining. Or that suburb built 50 miles away from the nearest job. Hunting is such a *minor* ecological nuisance and hunters have such an obvious desire to preserve habitat that I think we can at least say that such people are net positives from an environmentalist perspective.
posted by TeatimeGrommit at 6:09 PM on October 20, 2007


Sort of on topic: when I was a kid fishing up at Lake Alice one of our more crazy Irish setters managed to find (and chase!) a full grown buck moose. Fortunately the moose decided to run instead of just stomping the dog flat, and ran to the lake, jumped in and swam straight across. The dog followed for a while, but gave up after a hundred yards or so. The moose casually swam all the way across the lake, his huge antlers visible the whole while. Pretty awesome actually.
posted by dopeypanda at 6:44 PM on October 20, 2007


What ridiculous over-reaction. If the guy is a successful hunter, he will bag himself a deer this fall. What earthly difference does it make if he bags some other deer instead of this one? A deer's gonna be put in someone's freezer one way or another. What makes this one so special that it should have an exemption from that fate?
posted by five fresh fish at 7:13 PM on October 20, 2007


FFF: I don't have a problem with hunting in general, but the 'casual cruelty' of this guy is just striking, in that it struck me as being very weird. He saved this deer so he could kill it later? And this whole "you owe me" thing.

I just found it very weird and disturbing. I mean, he obviously saved the deer because he had empathy for it, but he's going to kill it anyway?

If he didn't have empathy for the thing, he wouldn't have saved it in the first place.

if a person X's empathy for a thing Ex and a person kills a thing Kx then weirdness = Ex ∩ Kx.
posted by delmoi at 7:37 PM on October 20, 2007


It just sounds douchey to save a deer and then vow, as it shivers in shock before you, to kill it later. And if he was kidding, he has a douchey sense of humor.

I love the small town reporter schtick - from the original story in Maryland (by an 81-year-old? awesome) to the diligent Wisconsin checker-upper.
posted by CunningLinguist at 7:41 PM on October 20, 2007


The guy basically said he planned on shotting the deer once it was legal, or something.

Given that he was out there in his boat for some recreation killing of things this seems consistant on his part. Why the outrage at the hunting but not the fishing? Maybe he could have held it's head under until it drowned and claimed he tried to rescue it but was too late. MMmm... off season vension...
posted by adamt at 7:49 PM on October 20, 2007


Hunting is such a *minor* ecological nuisance and hunters have such an obvious desire to preserve habitat that I think we can at least say that such people are net positives from an environmentalist perspective.

I'm sure the American Bison would agree with you.
posted by euphorb at 8:31 PM on October 20, 2007


I can't see how you guys don't read him as "joking". He's talking to a deer. If he thinks the deer is taking it seriously, he's got more problems than just failing to make you laugh.
———
Euphorb, why would you want to write that? You under the impression we're still harvesting buffalo for their phosphorus and pelt? C'mon, give your head a shake.
posted by five fresh fish at 8:41 PM on October 20, 2007


For folks who see a disconnect between saving the animal and hunting it: I see where you're coming from, but hunters think about this differently. The act of killing an animal is tightly bound up with the respect and empathy the hunter has for the animal and for nature in general. Killing an animal in the context of the hunt is different from killing an animal in an inappropriate manner/place/time. What these guys did makes perfect sense to me (although I also think that they were mostly joking around).

Hunters and anglers were pivotal in the birth of American conservation movement 100 years ago, when ethical sportsmen led the charge to shut down wanton market hunting and protect habitat for fish and wildlife, and they're just as pivotal today. Fish and wildlife conservation is overwhelmingly funded by hunters and anglers. Most state fish and wildlife agences are funded largely/exclusively by license sales rather than taxpayer dollars, and the core federal programs that provide funding for fish and wildlife - the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act and the Dingell-Johnson/Wallop-Breaux Sportfish Restoration Act - are funded from excise taxes on firearms, ammunition, fishing tackle, motorboat fuels, and a few other stray taxes. So snark all you want about these guys, but the reality is that they have probably put more of their own cash into wildlife conservation than your average mefite.
posted by wick47 at 8:47 PM on October 20, 2007 [3 favorites]


A Runnable Stag:
When the pods went pop on the broom, green broom,
And apples began to be golden-skinn'd,
We harbour'd a stag in the Priory coomb,
And we feather'd his trail up-wind, up-wind,
We feather'd his trail up-wind-
A stag of warrant, a stag, a stag,
A runnable stag, a kingly crop,
Brow, bay and tray and three on top,
A stag, a runnable stag.

Then the huntsman's horn rang yap, yap yap,
And 'Forwards' we heard the harbourer shout;
But 'twas only a brocket that broke a gap
In the beechen underwood, driven out,
From the underwood antler'd out
By warrant and might of the stag, the stag,
The runnable stag, whose lordly mind
Was bent on sleep though beam'd and tined
He stood, a runnable stag

So we tufted the covert till afternoon
With Tinkerman's Pup and Bell- of-the-North;
And hunters were sulky and hounds out of tune
Before we tufted the right stag forth,
Before we tufted him forth,
The stag of warrant, the wily stag,
The runnable stag with his kingly crop,
Brow, bay and tray and three on top,
The royal and runnable stag.

It was Bell-of-the-North and Tinkerman's Pup
That stuck to the scent till the copse was drawn.
'Tally ho! tally ho!' and the hunt was up,
The tufters whipp'd and the pack laid on,
The resolute pack laid on,
And the stag of warrant away at last,
The runnable stag, the same, the same,
His hoofs on fire, his horns like flame,
A stag, a runnable stag.

'Let your gelding be: if you check or chide
He stumbles at once and you're out of the hunt
For three hundred gentlemen, able to ride,
On hunters accustom'd to bear the brunt,
Accustom'd to bear the brunt,
Are after the runnable stag, the stag,
The runnable stag with his kingly crop,
Brow, bay and tray and three on top,
The right, the runnable stag.

By perilous paths in coomb and dell,
The heather, the rocks, and the river-bed,
The pace grew hot, for the scent lay well,
And a runnable stag goes right ahead,
The quarry went right ahead--
Ahead, ahead, and fast and far;
His antler'd crest, his cloven hoof,
Brow, bay and tray and three aloof,
The stag, the runnable stag.

For a matter of twenty miles and more,
By the densest hedge and the highest wall,
Through herds of bullocks lie baffled the lore
Of harbourer, huntsman, hounds and all,
Of harbourer, hounds and all
The stag of warrant, the wily stag,
For twenty miles, and five and five,
He ran, and he never was caught alive,
This stag, this runnable stag.

When he turn'd at bay in the leafy gloom,
In the emerald gloom where the brook ran deep
He heard in the distance the rollers boom,
And he saw In a vision of peaceful sleep
In a wonderful vision of sleep,
A stag of warrant, a stag, a stag,
A runnable stag in a jewell'd bed,
Under the sheltering ocean dead,
A stag, a runnable stag.

So a fateful hope lit up his eye,
And he open'd his nostrils wide again,
And he toss'd his branching antlers high
As he headed the hunt down the Charlock glen,
As he raced down the echoing glen
For five miles more, the stag, the stag,
For twenty miles, and five and five,
Not to be caught now, dead or alive,
The stag, the runnable stag.

Three hundred gentleman, able to ride,
Three hundred horses as gallant and free,
Beheld him escape on the evening tide,
Far out till he sank in the Severn Sea,
Till he sank in the depths of the sea
The stag, the buoyant stag, the stag
That slept at last in a jewell'd bed
Under the sheltering ocean spread,
The stag, the runnable stag.
Hunters getting credit for protecting wildlife? It's a bit like praising some rich guy for saving the local girls' school because he wants to ensure the supply of young girls in short skirts to chase.
posted by pracowity at 9:06 PM on October 20, 2007


For folks who see a disconnect between saving the animal and hunting it: I see where you're coming from, but hunters think about this differently. The act of killing an animal is tightly bound up with the respect and empathy the hunter has for the animal and for nature in general. Killing an animal in the context of the hunt is different from killing an animal in an inappropriate manner/place/time. What these guys did makes perfect sense to me (although I also think that they were mostly joking around).

I agree with you that there are some hunters like that. I sold outdoor sporting goods in a former life and I would posit that there are many "hunters" who drive logging roads half drunk and then just blast the crap out of anything not wearing blaze orange.

But, yes, hunting is generally a net gain for the environment when confined to deer (lord know there's more than enough of those critters here). It's the hunting of endangered species and animals taken strictly for a prize like their head, horns or claws that's not so hot.
posted by maxwelton at 9:08 PM on October 20, 2007


It's really sad if you look at those pictures backwards :(
posted by mikesch at 9:23 PM on October 20, 2007 [6 favorites]


Holy crap, I just dropped in to add some ittle stories about swimming deer and I run into a full fledged debate on the ethics of hunting, epic poetry and conservation movement history...

Anyway, at the risk of derailing this very interesting thread let me just say that I know for a fact that deer are great swimmers. The British Columbia Gulf Islands, where I live are chock full of deer, many of whom live on islands that their predators can't reach. Bowen Island, where I live is about two miles from the nearest land, and that across a choppy and cold tidal chuck Quite a swim for any non-marine animal, but deer make it all the time. I see deer in the water probably once or twice a year, making shorter journeys, but it never ceases to amaze me how surreal it seems.

About ten years ago a commercial fisherman friend of mine told me a story of seeing a deer paddling tiredly out in the middle of the Strait of Georgia. He estimated that the deer was upwards of five miles from land, and he didn't give it much of a chance for survival. He was amazed to see it out there though.

But you probably want to hear a more verifiable story and so , here is a lovely one of a deer rescued off Cornwall by a couple of local fishermen. The rescuers grabbed it out of the water and packed it in their van before contacting the RSPCA. Hopefully that vignette should give comfort to those who wish for more rescuers with more pure motives.

(Course they did get right back out to sea to resume their lobster slaughter. Back to the debate...)
posted by salishsea at 9:32 PM on October 20, 2007


Wow, y'all are a bunch of damn ninnies. What was he supposed to do, sign it up for PETA? He's a hunter, for God's sake.
posted by nasreddin at 9:56 PM on October 20, 2007


This is another great example of MeFi overthinking a plate of beans. Seriously. The guy made a joke. It was a joke. So just... y'know. Chill.

It's really sad if you look at those pictures backwards :(

I cracked up at this.
posted by CitrusFreak12 at 10:46 PM on October 20, 2007


I mean, he obviously saved the deer because he had empathy for it, but he's going to kill it anyway?

Can't imagine dying from exhaustion and subsequent drowning today is a preferable death to a clean kill a few years from now.

I see nothing the least self-contradictory in preferring it die quickly while in its prime, than to linger in ill health for a year until winter kills it off; or to starve during a drought; or to be mauled by a big cat; or to break a leg and slowly waste away.
posted by five fresh fish at 10:54 PM on October 20, 2007


And of course he rescued it. You can always fish another day. It's not damn often you get to rescue a deer. Especially in a boat. Helluva story to tell your buddies, way better than the one about how the fish weren't biting.

Geez, why immediately think the guy is some sort of monster? What a negative view of people.
posted by five fresh fish at 10:56 PM on October 20, 2007


I can't see how you guys don't read him as "joking".

I did, I just didn't think he was funny. Given the context of the story, the 'Yeah, I saved it, but come this fall, the gloves are off,' ending came off as defensive posturing to me.

Geez, why immediately think the guy is some sort of monster?

Why immediately assume that everyone who found the comment off-putting are weak sisters who don't understand a thing about hunting?
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 4:25 AM on October 21, 2007


Wow, y'all are a bunch of damn ninnies. What was he supposed to do, sign it up for PETA? He's a hunter, for God's sake.

Indeed. I'm sorry he didn't stand up and give a speech on how we are all stewards of this earth and must do everything in our power to protect all life. He was out fishing, that gives you a clue on his motivations in relation to nature, and as far as I'm concerned that's just fine.
posted by Mr.Encyclopedia at 5:31 AM on October 21, 2007


I see nothing the least self-contradictory in preferring it die quickly while in its prime, than to linger in ill health for a year until winter kills it off; or to starve during a drought; or to be mauled by a big cat; or to break a leg and slowly waste away.

But that still belies this attitude that the animals life exists for the guy's pleasure, that he has the right to decide whether it lives or dies or whatever. Plus the whole "payback time" thing.

Look, I'm not opposed to hunting, but that doesn't mean I can't find the attitudes of some hunters a little creepy.
posted by delmoi at 7:45 AM on October 21, 2007


still belies this attitude that the animals life exists for the guy's pleasure

Ludicrous.
posted by five fresh fish at 9:34 AM on October 21, 2007


What delmoi clarified upon, guy sounds like a shitheel.

And plus, y'know, he owns a boat.


A boat! Quelle horreur! My god, will he stop at nothing?
posted by enn at 9:43 AM on October 21, 2007


A boat! Quelle horreur! My god, will he stop at nothing?

Probably at or slightly over the shoreline, I'm guessing. Wakka-wakka.

I was making a joking reference to this Mitt Romney FPP.
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 11:30 AM on October 21, 2007 [1 favorite]


For folks who see a disconnect between saving the animal and hunting it: I see where you're coming from, but hunters think about this differently. The act of killing an animal is tightly bound up with the respect and empathy the hunter has for the animal and for nature in general. Killing an animal in the context of the hunt is different from killing an animal in an inappropriate manner/place/time.
Unless you're Dick Cheney and his buddies, of course. That whole "bringing a cage full of animals to some designated area just to be released and shot by rich old men out pretending to be hunters" thing is extra-disgusting. Regular hanging out in the woods, having a license, waiting for a non-endangered animal to come by, and not cheating is better i guess, if you have to do it.
posted by amberglow at 11:48 AM on October 21, 2007


Without thinning the deer herds, which always eventually become a problem, the situation for the deer gets considerably worse anyway. Hunters provide a valuable service, and not just when they're saving drowning Bambi.
posted by nasreddin at 2:18 PM on October 21, 2007 [1 favorite]


Plus the whole "payback time" thing.

Really, delmoi. It was a joke. Let it go and/or develop a sense of humor before critiquing a throwaway joke from someone who saved an animal's life.
posted by dhammond at 3:50 PM on October 21, 2007


Regular hanging out in the woods, having a license, waiting for a non-endangered animal to come by, and not cheating is better i guess, if you have to do it.

I find this to be just as disgusting as what Cheney does. I take a days hike into the heart of the forest, put a plate on the ground, and wait for a non-endangered animal to lay itself down on the plate and will itself to death.
posted by CitrusFreak12 at 4:21 PM on October 21, 2007


All I have to say is that I have a kick-ass black bean and venison chili recipe so if any of you all bag one this season and have a few spare steaks, send them my way.
posted by octothorpe at 6:39 PM on October 21, 2007


Without thinning the deer herds, which always eventually become a problem, the situation for the deer gets considerably worse anyway. Hunters provide a valuable service, and not just when they're saving drowning Bambi.

Why do you think deer populations grow so large that they need to be thinned?
posted by euphorb at 7:28 PM on October 21, 2007


2005: Deer eating away at forests nationwide
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 7:33 PM on October 21, 2007



Why do you think deer populations grow so large that they need to be thinned?


Because animal populations expand to the carrying capacity of their environment?
posted by nasreddin at 9:20 PM on October 21, 2007


Without thinning the deer herds, which always eventually become a problem, the situation for the deer gets considerably worse anyway.

If it were possible to keep the numbers manageable without killing deer (perhaps by sterilizing them with darts or something in their food), thus making it unnecessary to kill them, then you'd be for banning deer hunting, right?
posted by pracowity at 9:21 PM on October 21, 2007


Why do you think deer populations grow so large that they need to be thinned?

Because animal populations expand to the carrying capacity of their environment?

I'll give you a hint.
posted by euphorb at 9:32 PM on October 21, 2007


If it were possible to keep the numbers manageable without killing deer (perhaps by sterilizing them with darts or something in their food), thus making it unnecessary to kill them, then you'd be for banning deer hunting, right?

Due more to laziness than having an issue with it, I've never done it myself - but I'd rather kill and eat them than just sterilizing them.

The latter seems a lot more like just fucking with the environment.

And would be a lot less delicious.

It's also sure a lot more humane and 'natural' than the way most meat is produced.
posted by flaterik at 11:12 PM on October 21, 2007


I'll give you a hint.

The deer's predators were not exterminated by individual recreational hunters. They were eradicated by the government through a series of systematic and deliberate programs.


If it were possible to keep the numbers manageable without killing deer (perhaps by sterilizing them with darts or something in their food), thus making it unnecessary to kill them, then you'd be for banning deer hunting, right?


No. I'm not basing a defense of hunting on pragmatic considerations, but I do consider these an added benefit. Besides, I am not convinced that forced sterilization is any more respectful of the deer's rights than killing them outright.
posted by nasreddin at 11:37 PM on October 21, 2007


this happens lots of time in Europe. The young deers gets scared by dog and falls into canals. The side of the canals are vertical, so the deer just swim until he dies.

While boating on the canals i managed to save one and failed to saved another one.

They are usually so tired they don't offer any resistance at all. We wrapped the deer with some towels and put him on deck just where the hot air of the engine room blows out (it was winter, freezing cold).

After half an hour of this he was frisky again, once put on land he went for the woods.
posted by elcapitano at 3:37 AM on October 22, 2007 [2 favorites]


"Does it make me an asshole to hate this guy?"
posted by floam at 1:47 PM on October 20

Answer: No. I stopped reading at "Since the fish weren't biting" part and didn't get to savor the "See you on opening day; payback time" bit. Look on the bright side, though. Maybe one of his buddies will accidentally shoot him on opening day.
posted by cousincozen at 9:43 AM on October 22, 2007


Thanks for being our poster-boy for retardation this Monday, cousincozen!
posted by five fresh fish at 7:33 PM on October 22, 2007


Yeah, right. And you're the one who fantasizes that hunters mete out "clean kills."

I think it was an apt observation made by an earlier commenter, that, for this latent psychopath and his buddies, flipping through the pix in reverse order made just as much sense.
posted by cousincozen at 9:28 PM on October 23, 2007


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