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Sending Texans a message
March 27, 2001 1:59 PM   Subscribe

Sending Texans a message -- more than one million Texans can look forward to receiving a "video version of the New Testament account of Luke" in their mailboxes. The group's goal is to send the video to every Texas home -- eight million. The video was made 22 years ago and is 83-minutes long.

Will the message fall on deaf ears? Isn't there a better way?
posted by 7sharp11 (50 comments total)


 

Be cool!
Watch it on the Jesus Video Project Homepage. I liked what the ADL had to say about it: They're not targeting non-Christians ... we don't have a problem with it.
posted by rschram at 2:12 PM on March 27, 2001


Remember texans, if you put a piece of duct tape over the little copy protection square slot on the right side of the tape, you can record over it.
posted by mathowie at 2:12 PM on March 27, 2001


Will the message fall on deaf ears?

If you send a non-christian, a christian tape...they will either throw it away, or patch the copy-protect tab (atleast that's what I did with all my free AOL diskettes).

Many people know the stories though, and christians will probably appreciate the addition to their library, but what I don't understand is why this organization is spending (read wasting) 2.7 million on entertainment when they could have directed it to help the needy? Just my take on it though.
posted by samsara at 2:15 PM on March 27, 2001


I guess Jesus hired a PR/Marketing firm.
posted by jennyb at 2:19 PM on March 27, 2001


I guess Jesus hired a PR/Marketing firm.

It was probably the work of this guy.
posted by jpoulos at 2:27 PM on March 27, 2001


Why do you consider this movie entertainment, samsara? I think the idea here is that they're trying to proselytize through a popular medium. It's my impression that the purpose of religious groups was to spread the word, not take care of the needy.
posted by OneBallJay at 2:29 PM on March 27, 2001


We just have a different viewpoint, that's all. My impression is that the spreading of the word happens through many levels...helping the needy being one of them (ie. creating missions to offer guidence along with the supporting of needs). I also find this as entertainment because in my view, entertainment is symbiotic with popular mediums.
posted by samsara at 2:35 PM on March 27, 2001


Will the message fall on deaf ears?

To a lot of fundamentalists, it doesn't matter. What matters is that they make the attempt. They'd like to have a high success rate, natch, but they're compelled to try regardless.
posted by aaron at 2:37 PM on March 27, 2001



Does anybody, Christians or otherwise recognize this as dangerous? What we have here, it seems is serious political propaganda, masquerading as outreach. Oops, I guess that would be the definition of "outreach" if your goal is to have everybody think, act and believe alike.

Stoking those coals of fear of progressive secularism.

I want to laugh because it bolsters certain Texas stereotypes, but this is scary, even from so far away.
posted by crasspastor at 2:53 PM on March 27, 2001


Return to Sender. Wrong Address.
posted by Wizzle at 2:56 PM on March 27, 2001


From the JVP web site: "We are servants of God and the Harvest is plentiful. Would you want to be fired by God?"
posted by rschram at 2:59 PM on March 27, 2001


Wizzle: record Marilyn Manson vids over it, carefully re-package it in the original box, THEN do a return to sender. With any luck, they'll try again with another address.
posted by frykitty at 3:04 PM on March 27, 2001


Totally harmless. At least its more entertaining than the crap these idiots fill my mailbox with.
posted by owillis at 3:05 PM on March 27, 2001


Hey, I used a Val-U-Pak coupon once...I think...

I don't see much harm in it either, I'll probably watch it just to say I did. I can also see how some people might relate it to junk mail.
posted by 7sharp11 at 3:14 PM on March 27, 2001


The irony for me, is that the video this group is sending-out to all of Texas was produced, in large part, by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. You know: the Mormons.

I don't need to remind anyone of the "warm" and "friendly" feelings that a significant sub-set of Protestants have for Mormons... something tells me that this niggling detail will not make it onto the promotional material.

: )

As a member of a proselyting church myself (I'm Mormon), I wholeheartedly agree with Samsara's second comment... there's no use talking about Christ unless there's food on the table and some reasonable amount of personal security; churches must address the whole human.

Of course, Samsara's first comment sounds typical of many comments I've heard from people that don't understand, condone, or sympathize with the proselytizing paradigm. It's an increasingly rare paradigm in this age, so I'm not surprised... but for most people who believe in their respective cause, proselytizing is a natural manifestation of deep-seated feelings.
posted by silusGROK at 3:15 PM on March 27, 2001


Movie of the Book of Luke = political propaganda?

Somewhere you lost me. If it was the white house, or one of dubya-D-40's cronies doing this, then maybe. But the Campus Crusade for Christ isn't really a political group. And how is this encouraging everybody to think, act, and believe alike? They're evangelizing, not practicing thought control. If they were sending out copies of Ben-Hur (one of my personal favorites), would you be saying the same thing?

If you don't like it, tape over it, send it back, whatever. Is it so hard to believe that some people are actually sincere about their beliefs and want to share that with others?
posted by OneBallJay at 3:19 PM on March 27, 2001


Sorry about that folks... I didn't proof the links I used in my last post. My bad.
posted by silusGROK at 3:20 PM on March 27, 2001


ugh... videocassete?! this Texas residents' (i wasn't born here so i'm not really a texan) VCR and video tapes are in a box somewhere in the garage. I'm all dvd and TiVo, none of that grainy, fuzzy, poor sound quality, pan and scan Jesus for me.
posted by jbelshaw at 3:22 PM on March 27, 2001


There's a reason that it isn't Ben Hur. Sending a copy of a production of, by and for a particular religious ideology to every household in a large jurisdiction is patently politically motivated. Perhaps not seemingly on its surface, but down below, where these things count, Campus Crusade for Christ is an organization whose purpose is to have everybody thinking and acting in unison, in a country that they control, precisely because certain individuals acted in unison to make that power possible.

There is hardly the barrier we thought between government activity and it's best mouthpiece--the churches and the propaganda machines that Focus on the Family, Campus Crusade for Christ et al are.
posted by crasspastor at 3:29 PM on March 27, 2001


Sending a copy of a production of, by and for a particular religious ideology to every household in a large jurisdiction is patently politically motivated

Read:

Sending a copy of a production. . .is patently politically motivated and exists as a potent rallying call. Unlike Ben Hur. . .
posted by crasspastor at 3:34 PM on March 27, 2001


Produced by the Mormons? Anyone else see a Blockbuster Video relationship here? And as far PR firm, perhaps it is for this guy.
posted by bison at 3:40 PM on March 27, 2001


well this has already got me learning one thing - IMDB will NOT let me search for movies that are less than 83 minutes long. Being ever positive, I was tryin to find a constructive use for the tape...
posted by DiplomaticImmunity at 3:47 PM on March 27, 2001


There is hardly the barrier we thought between government activity and it's best mouthpiece--the churches and the propaganda machines that Focus on the Family, Campus Crusade for Christ et al are.

I'm not sure how I would approach that other than the possibility why is because the added power of unison is really only seen as a plus to a much larger goal...which is to indentify and share a common belief. I sincerely doubt that there is anything wrong with this, I mean, god forbid that religeon has a voice in this country. But on the other hand, as Vis10n pointed out, there is a great need (rather, almost an obligation) for organized religeons to reach out. Mormons, in particular, are known for their huge social gatherings and heavy advertisement

From personal experience, I was training in Rochester, NY a couple years ago with nothing to do. I saw pamphlets throughout the place advertising a huge event not too far away. The show was spectacular, yet I was thrown off a bit by enthusiats speaking their beliefs and handing out literature. That's all it was to me, just different beliefs than mine. To make a long story short, I ended up hitching a ride back to the hotel with a mormon couple. With great enthusiasm, they told me about how they were drawn to the book...and how they were converted. As they dropped me off, they gave me "The Book of Mormon" from the trunk of their car.

They were really nice folks with good intentions. I kept the book, yet am still going to stick with my own beliefs...
posted by samsara at 3:51 PM on March 27, 2001


Crasspastor... although I cannot patently reject the idea that there may be political motivation to CCfC's efforts, but I do disagree with your (apparent) assertion that proselytizing must equate to politicking... especially considering your ominous "big brother" tone. It's absurd.

Bison... the Church has long been involved with motion pictures. No big surprise, when communication is a large part of your job/calling.

Samsara... thanks for the anecdote... I know the pageant you attended, and it's quite a big to-do. A little overwhelming, especially with all the people outside of the event trying to tell you why Mormons are going to Hell. It's a great testament to the passion that so many people have for their beliefs. I think it's great fun.

Now if you'd only read that book.... ; )
posted by silusGROK at 4:03 PM on March 27, 2001


I'm still not quite clear where the political motivation for sending these movies out comes into play. Yes, large Christian groups are often politically active, but I don't understand why you see this as a political move, or a potent rallying call for political action. Mayhaps I'm too trusting of their motives, but this seems like the equivalent of a Billy Graham television crusade, not Washington telling Texas that the Christian way is the only way through their "best mouthpiece" (or maybe you would see the Billy Graham crusade the same way). Yes, the CCC probably would like to see everybody believe the way they do, but I don't think they're trying to force anybody into anything. Their 1st amendment right to send material through the mail (just like everybody else) doesn't seem to me to be crossing the line separating church and state.

My analogy with Ben Hur is that they are both about the life of Christ, although Ben Hur's storyline is from a different perspective. I think the message contained in both is the same, that Jesus and his teachings can be life-changing, and maybe you (the watcher) may be interested in making that change.
posted by OneBallJay at 4:03 PM on March 27, 2001


Of course, this being the linky place that it is, maybe I should have said it this way:

"Now if you'd only read that book.... ; )"
posted by silusGROK at 4:16 PM on March 27, 2001


Oh for sure guys. I agree with most everything everyone's is saying, as they are all ideas and we're all welcome to them. But still, I think there is qualification for distrust of large organized proselytizing groups. Indeed all groups are made of individuals and I've never had a fear so poignant that I had an inability to see the person through the ideals they subscribe to.

My only point is that it is scary when it is possible to send out such media (perhaps it would have been cheaper to broadcast on PAX) for the sole reason that it is possible at all. . .make sense? In other words it wouldn't be being done if an impact of the qualities I've earlier related to, weren't attainable. It is the wholesale embracing of those qualities that are exactly what I fear. Nameless, faceless Christian Soldiers while on a recruitment crusade.
posted by crasspastor at 4:44 PM on March 27, 2001


CrassPastor... they are neither nameless, nor faceless. We know who they are, and for the most part what they stand for. Moreover, each individual receiving the mailing will _individually_ decide whether to take action or not.

You might as well be complaining about any mass marketing effort. The issue can't be the scale of the endeavor... so it must be the message. If you have a problem with Christianity, then say so... but ascribing to some large-scale effort by a group of (seemingly) sincere folks to get their message out in a non-threatening way some nefarious goal is ludicrous.
posted by silusGROK at 4:55 PM on March 27, 2001


You ever been to a Promise Keeper's rally in a sold out 80,000 strong stadium? That my friend is political, drenched in nothing but costumed propaganda. . .and as far as I'm concerned everybody there but myself remains to this day nameless and faceless. That was scary!

If I have a problem at all it is indeed huge corporate-like Christian orgs that never do anything without the ulterior motive of increasing membership. Increased interest base translates into increased lobby power.
posted by crasspastor at 5:10 PM on March 27, 2001


someone sends me something I did not ask for and do not want...I call it spam, no matter who it is about or what it is for. Used to come to the door selling encylopedias or vacuums. Now giving tapes. Toss it at them.
posted by Postroad at 5:57 PM on March 27, 2001


crasspastor: And what do they do, or have done, with lobby power? I personally don't fear groups of people that get together for a common goal....if it never happened, then nothing would had ever got done in this country. So I really don't see where you're speaking from, unless you suggesting that these people are less intelligent or more evil than the norm. I would have to totally disagree with you on that basis. What exactly are you suggesting?
posted by samsara at 6:04 PM on March 27, 2001


See, crasspastor, Postroad at least calls a spade a spade.
posted by silusGROK at 8:53 PM on March 27, 2001


if you want to help people, you help people.

if you want to use marketing to increase membership, or get a bigger mailing list that you can use later on for lobbying purposes [God doesn't like proposition 007!] you send out mass mailings. It is expensive and isn't done as a service, but for Gain. I'll bet you the church execs behind it know exactly what they are doing. Is that sorta what you were thinking crasspastor?

calling a spade a spade indeed. Marketing is marketing. It is never for the benefit of the end user, but for the company/organization spewing it out. If they wanted to help people they should send them information on improving their lives thru nutrition and education, with perhaps some safe-sex info thrown in to boot.
posted by th3ph17 at 9:13 PM on March 27, 2001


if you want to help people, you help people.

Exactly. I think the issue we're having here is that Christians believe it is their duty to spread the "good news", therefore any and all efforts of that are deemed good. And indeed spreading the word around to them is helping people.

Yet the most obnoxious thing about it is that by simple dint of accepting the tales of the Bible as truth, automatically precludes debate, and moreover, automatically deems all other philosophies false and not to be seriously considered. To the Christian (or indeed any evangelical religionist) it is not the desire to present rational argument, but rather appeal to emotions and our society's built in fear of sin.

So I really don't see where you're speaking from, unless you suggesting that these people are less intelligent or more evil than the norm.

People are regularly swayed by this persuasive attempt and that one. Am I looked at by Campus Crusade for Christ as less intelligent and evil because they felt it their need to intrude with what I do not accept? Who here has the monopoly on morality, truth and happiness? Clearly, by there surely being non-christians in Texas, CCC has taken it upon themselves to tell all straight thinking people that they are wrong and we are right. I disagree with those kind of values.

When Christian missionaries go to far away lands have they traditionally gone to learn what different cultures can teach them and us? No, they are there to make the indigenous choke down their flavor of truth one way or the other. Same thing here in America. Large groups of organized Christians tend to think that the rest of the country should swallow what they have. This is propaganda. . .and it's purpose is to mold society into what they think it should be.
posted by crasspastor at 9:50 PM on March 27, 2001


What would be the percentage of Texans who already consider themselves Christians?

98%? or something?
posted by lagado at 11:13 PM on March 27, 2001


I understand that with the media being what it is, the militants of every group are the ones who get heard most often and therefore, if one forms an opinion of a whole group based on the words of a select few, one might take the view that all members of a particular group are militant, oppressive, dim-witted and out to control the world. If they were sending out a video-taped sermon, I would tend to agree that it was propaganda. However, what they are sending out is essentially (if you are a non-Christian), a screen-play based on a story in a book. Personally, if someone sent me a video version of Siddhartha, I'd watch it, without assuming the Buddhists were out to control me...but then again, I went swimming yesterday, so maybe my Christian-mind-control-implant got wet and I need to have it replaced.
posted by freeride at 11:55 PM on March 27, 2001


Included in the mailing, I imagine, is how to find out more and who to contact for that. . .

The day "Siddhartha" is sent out to every home in any state is the day that we can all admit that the American virus has finally affected most every divot of religious uncannyness there is. Godbless the Buddhists for minding their own buisiness. Christians are control freaks.
posted by crasspastor at 3:22 AM on March 28, 2001


I went swimming yesterday, so maybe my Christian-mind-control-implant got wet and I need to have it replaced.

Replace it with what? Another one?
posted by crasspastor at 3:40 AM on March 28, 2001


Christians are control freaks.

You're baiting, aren't you? Nonetheless, keep in mind the actions they are taking will not cause you to wake up one Sunday morning and have a hankering to attend your local church. Read above, someone mentioned that this is a passive means of introducing people to their religion. If you're a texan, you wont be strapped into a chair with your eyelids taped open (clockwork orange was a great movie, btw) and forced to watch all 83 minutes. You can toss it, or tape your favorite porno over it...that's your decision. But to specifically attack an organization just because you want this thread to plummet towards Godwin's Law, well, that's absurd ;P
posted by samsara at 5:58 AM on March 28, 2001


What would be the percentage of Texans who already consider themselves Christians? 98%? or something?

That depends on where you live. From my experience (I am a Texan) there aren't really a whole lot of Christians in the cities (although many profess it). Urban:40%? Rural:85-90%? How is anyone supposed to estimate this? I guess if you focus on the word "consider" these percentages might be a lot higher. I, however, do not "consider" myself anything at all.
posted by csovine at 7:34 AM on March 28, 2001


People are regularly swayed by this persuasive attempt and that one.

True story #1: I once got a videocassette in the mail. It did not fall into my VCR. I checked to see who sent me the videocassette. I determined that I was not interested in watching the videocassette. In a stroke of free will, I did not watch the videocassette. Net result: Whatever behavior the senders of the video cassette wanted me to engage in never occurred.

True story #2: Last night I watched some TV. While watching the TV, I was informed that I was too fat, too ugly, poorly dressed, lacking status symbols, and that I needed to spend more time with my family. I was also informed as to what products could cure these ills. I purchased exactly none of them. My self image also survived the evening intact.

True Story #3: Just yesterday, a good friend tried to convince me that Duke was going to roll over Maryland in their Final Four game this weekend. I, on the other hand, pointed out that I believe that Maryland has outplayed Duke quite a bit this season and that I thought that they had a decent, if not significant, chance to beat Duke. My friend was not swayed. I was not swayed. We're still friends.

The moral of these stories: people have free will to decide how to deal with what everyone else tells them (as samsara and others have pointed out quite eloquently above). Unless we assume that most people are incapable of telling other people's opinions from their own (in which case we might want to rethink some of those oft quoted freedoms), we'd better come to terms with the fact that sometimes Group X will tell Individual Y about something, and that then Individual Y will choose to agree with Group X. Sure, people can tell you what you should believe, but you don't have to actually believe it. You can refute others with with fact, you can refute others with nonsense, you can scream, cover your ears, and run from the room. There's an awful lot of people trying to get you to see things their way going on (one could argue that this is the goal of all communication; that is, to change the behavior/thoughts of another) - not all of it necessarily has to do with politics. It's just that some (all?) people think that they are right about certain things. Considering that we're posting stuff here at MeFi, you and I are probably among those people.

(I hope I've affected your thinking in some way.) ;)
posted by iceberg273 at 8:22 AM on March 28, 2001


Being a (non-native) Texan, I received the Jesus Project video yesterday. I am not a practicing Christian, BTW. It seems harmless to me, and a waste of money for this group. All it is is a television movie produced by Warner Brothers. They could have sent out Ben-Hur or The Ten Commandments instead. It's a very soft sell. If they actually think it's going to convert anyone, they need some help.

I would be a lot happier though, if someone had sent me some sample marijuana in the mail, so I could find out what it was like. If we could just get all these Christians to try marijuana, they would see that it's not really as bad as they think it is (and they might loosen up a little).

The Marijuana Project -- coming soon to an area near you.
posted by timothompson at 8:35 AM on March 28, 2001


Off topic bit!

iceberg273: I believe that Maryland has outplayed Duke quite a bit this season and that I thought that they had a decent, if not significant, chance to beat Duke.

Ha! In your dreams...

Okay, sorry for the interruption. Back to the topic at hand:

I completely agree with Postroad's assessment that this video is spam. I would get as annoyed with this group of Christians for spamming my mailbox with a video as I get with the porn sites who send me emails inviting me to check out pictures of Misty, who has just turned 18 and is now ready to party.

I'm happy that these people are happy enough with their faith that they want to share it. However, just like how I feel about all junk mail, I'm not happy with the amount of wasted resources (production of materials) and piles of trash (materials sent to people like me who don't want them) that this endeavor generates. If you want to reach people, go stand on a street corner and preach. It's better for the environment.
posted by jennyb at 8:48 AM on March 28, 2001


It's my impression that the purpose of religious groups was to spread the word, not take care of the needy.

If the primary goal of religious groups is to "spread the Word", then I really, really, really don't want anything to do with them...and I especially don't want the government funding them.
posted by jpoulos at 10:29 AM on March 28, 2001


jpoulos, I totally agree. And I'm looking at it from the other side. Keep your government money out of my organization. I don't think any honest religions would want to accept government funding in a country that is founded on the separation of church and state.

Religion does do a lot of good in the world with the poor and the needy, but their ultimate goal is to make sure everyone has the opportunity to choose whether or not to follow Christ. As for wasting money that could be spent on the poor on mailing this video, I think most Christians would agree that it's not only the needy that need preachin'. This isn't the way I would choose to share my faith, but there are many routes into a person's mind in our society, one of which is through the television.

crasspastor: Yet the most obnoxious thing about it is that by simple dint of accepting the tales of the Bible as truth, automatically precludes debate, and moreover, automatically deems all other philosophies false and not to be seriously considered. To the Christian (or indeed any evangelical religionist) it is not the desire to present rational argument, but rather appeal to emotions and our society's built in fear of sin.

You may speak for yourself, but not for me. I'm open to debate. I seriously consider all faiths (or lack thereof), and have a lot of respect for the beliefs of others. I don't actively indoctrinate people that don't come to me with questions about what I believe. I live my life hoping that people will notice that there's something different about me, and will want to know what it is. I think the message Christians should be advertising is the hope for something more, not the fear of sin.

It seems somewhere in your past some Christian person/organization did you wrong. I try not to judge the motives of all Christians/Jews/Hindus/Buddhists/Muslims/Athiests/etc from my interaction with a select few, why is it too much to ask for that courtesy from you?
posted by OneBallJay at 11:53 AM on March 28, 2001


You're baiting, aren't you?

Couldn't be further from the truth. It was said that if a movie on Siddhartha was sent out to every house in a particular area, that would be okay, equally okay as a movie about Jesus being sent out. Therefore, I made the point that it wouldn't be done by Buddhists and that such behavior is typical of Christians. Indeed, American Christians.

True story #1: I once got a videocassette in the mail. It did not fall into my VCR.

If we are all so immune to this, then why is the tactic employed at all? I suggest. . .to persuade.

I live my life hoping that people will notice that there's something different about me, and will want to know what it is.

That's fine. If you'll notice, clear at the very top of this thread I wrote. . .
I agree with most everything everyone's is saying, as they are all ideas and we're all welcome to them. But still, I think there is qualification for distrust of large organized proselytizing groups. Indeed all groups are made of individuals and I've never had a fear so poignant that I had an inability to see the person through the ideals they subscribe to.

I feel the same way, as I've already stated. I'm not hateful. It seems you're inferring some deep seated fear or hatred that I have of *Christians*. Nope. I only disagree with the use of organized movements to drown out the alternatives to what I tend to think isn't necessarily all true.

It seems somewhere in your past some Christian person/organization did you wrong.

I'm sorry that I can't quite be pigeonholed into that one. I made an argument and have more or less spelled out my points. It's really no big deal. Yet, it reminds me of most any theological debate and how they usually end. . .with little notice to the premises given throughout the discourse, the "unbeliever" is usually admonished of his ways and told he'll be prayed for. As one day we'll see the light. And that's where these things end.

And to add one last thingy. . .I didn't involve myself in this thread for endless theological debate. And also I apologize if I've offended any of you. I think if we reread the thread we can see there really are no hard feelings. At least coming from me.
posted by crasspastor at 3:50 PM on March 28, 2001


True story #1: I once got a videocassette in the mail. It did not fall into my VCR.

If we are all so immune to this, then why is the tactic employed at all?


Just because people happen to do something doesn't mean it works. Stupid ideas that don't work have a way of surviving despite all odds.
posted by dagnyscott at 4:52 PM on March 28, 2001


While not a huge fan of the man myself, I think James Dobson might find you a bit hateful, crasspastor. :)

I only disagree with the use of organized movements to drown out the alternatives to what I tend to think isn't necessarily all true

I've never heard of Christian or any other organized movements in America (other than Scientologists and the RIAA) trying to repress other people's ideas. Yes, large movements have a large voice, but that doesn't mean they're cramming it down your throat or beating down any dissent. They might say they think the dissenters are wrong, but isn't that their right - it's just like we do here on MeFi, just scaled up. There are lots of folks that think Christianity isn't all true, and nobody's trying to silence them. (or is that the Jesuits knocking on your door right now)

I'm also not trying to involve myself in a theological debate, but I don't understand why this move frightens you so much. Credit card companies send me their messages promoting the religion of debt spending ten times a week (and they just reformed our bankruptcy system with a little green paper grease and some Dubya-D-40, maybe we should be frightened). AOL does the same. Like others have mentioned, I don't think this method of evangelism will be very effective, but at least the money isn't being spent on Capitol Hill pushing the pro-life agenda. Seems you should be glad they're throwing away their money in Texas, instead.

By the way, I have no hard feelings at all, and I'm not offended in the least.
posted by OneBallJay at 5:34 PM on March 28, 2001


While not a huge fan of the man myself, I think James Dobson might find you a bit hateful, crasspastor. :)

It's true I'm no fan of any of it. I'll probably end up getting called out on that link acctboy! ;-}

(and they just reformed our bankruptcy system with a little green paper grease and some Dubya-D-40, maybe we should be frightened).


Aye. . .a brand new can of worms! Won't go into it here, but one way or the other it seems religion and absolute control go hand in hand and makes for some very prosperous times for the select few.


Oh and one more thing I noticed. . .

There are lots of folks that think Christianity isn't all true, and nobody's trying to silence them.

"Nobody" is perhaps a little blanketed.
posted by crasspastor at 8:31 PM on March 28, 2001


A note of interest: got my tape today. It was in my mail box(real one). No wrapping, no name , no address. Just a tape in shrink wrap. ASSEMBLED IN MEXICO Cost to sender-not much.
posted by bjgeiger at 2:52 PM on March 29, 2001


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