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Flying with the green fairy
December 5, 2007 8:44 AM   Subscribe

Meet St. George Absinthe Verte, "the first American-made absinthe on the market in almost a century." Since Absinthe was legalized earlier this year, various brewers have moved into the market--but is is really the same thujone-enhanced drink that drove many-an-artist to madness?
posted by dead_ (65 comments total) 19 users marked this as a favorite

 
I see absinthe for sale in the LCBO up here, but the giganto price tag has always put me off. Anybody have any firsthand reports?
posted by the dief at 8:52 AM on December 5, 2007


I'll stick to importing my Jade. I haven't tried Lucid yet, but - even though I have a tremendous amount of faith in Ted Breaux - I'm afraid that it would let me down when compared to his French labels.
posted by kaseijin at 8:53 AM on December 5, 2007


Previous absinthe discussions: 1, 2, 3, 4
posted by pineapple at 8:53 AM on December 5, 2007


The dief - real absinthe is quite good, with a complex herbal flavor. I would suggest heading over to the fee verte forums (feeverte.net) and making acquaintances. The people there are very knowledgeable about what is good on the current market.
posted by kaseijin at 8:55 AM on December 5, 2007


I saw a bottle of "Absente" the other day in the liquor store and it was priced around $60, IIRC. Included the spoon, too. I've been intrigued by the stuff on and off for awhile now, and keep returning to AbsintheClassics for another look-see.
posted by jquinby at 8:58 AM on December 5, 2007


"Absente" is nasty. It tastes like you're sucking on a black jellybean. I would put that $60 bucks to importing a good bottle.
posted by kaseijin at 9:04 AM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


Anybody have any firsthand reports?

I had some once, before this legalization or whatever. It's a very delicious drink (good enough that I checked to see if the PA state liquor stores had any, but of course not), but for me, definitely just a drink.
posted by TheOnlyCoolTim at 9:07 AM on December 5, 2007


A few years ago I actually made some absinthe from scratch. It was maybe in 2001, and the process was laborious. We used Skyy Vodka as our base, and a whole bunch of wormwood. During our "brewing" I felt like some kind of witch, standing over a cauldron (there's a lot of steeping and boiling and so-forth, if I remember correctly).

In the end it tasted like crap--really heavy on the anise--but the hallucinogenic effects came on in full-force, and I'm considering doing it again, purely for that purpose.

A fascinating drug, indeed.
posted by dead_ at 9:10 AM on December 5, 2007


If you're interesting in acquiring the various accouterments to accompany your absinthe, Frenchman Sarl has a great selection, and they are of decent quality as well.

I've got a couple of Pontarlier reservoir glasses from him, and they are beautiful, beautiful glasses.
posted by kaseijin at 9:10 AM on December 5, 2007


This slightly older Wired article on Ted Breaux is excellent. Older authentic absinthe tested at very low thujone. I've tasted some of Breaux's imports and they are excellent, and I look forward to trying some of the made-in-U.S. varieties.
posted by exogenous at 9:11 AM on December 5, 2007


We just designed a website and collateral for an Absinthe bar.
posted by tkchrist at 9:15 AM on December 5, 2007


Seven years ago, I moved in with my girlfriend. The night before the big move, I was a little nervous and couldn't sleep. At about two in the morning I went into the kitchen of the apartment she shared with a couple other people to see if there was anything to, you know, take the edge off and help me get some shuteye. The only booze in the house was a bottle of absinthe a friend of hers had brought back from Prague. I didn't know much about absinthe, but I did know I wanted to get some sleep, so I poured myself a couple of stiff shots and gulped them down. It tasted like fermented Scope, but let me tell you...it chilled me right the fuck out.
posted by The Card Cheat at 9:16 AM on December 5, 2007


Since Absinthe was legalized earlier this year...

Can anyone provide a citation? My understanding is that this a unique label made specifically to circumvent US regulations regarding thujone.
posted by malocchio at 9:17 AM on December 5, 2007


Everything I've read about absinthe suggests that thujone is a red herring at best. A lot of the stuff being produced today has artificially high concentrations of it due to the common misconception that it was responsible for the popularity of (and supposed hallucinatory qualities of) Pre-Ban absinthe. Recent tests have concluded, though, that Pre-Ban absinthe had minuscule levels of the chemical. In effect, it's like putting more strychnine in your blotter acid.
posted by lekvar at 9:35 AM on December 5, 2007


My understanding of Absinthe's legal status is that absinthe in the US must be "thujone free", but that "thujone free" translates in practical terms to less than 10ppm (parts per million).

I recall reading that mass spec analysis of original absinthe from pre-ban days shows that thujone quantity was likely under this threshold to begin with. Furthermore the suspicion is that that a lot of the supposed uniquely malicious effects of absinthe were trumped up as a combination of ill-informed science and the strength of the temperance movement that eventually helped push through general prohibition at least here in the US.

That said, I've found a frustratingly wide variety of vaguely worded stories on the legal status of absinthe in the US. I think the basic gist at least is that absinthe has technically been legal all this time, and that it just took some motivated producers to convince the FDA/whoever. Does anyone have a more detailed and authoritative word on this?

Hopefully these first few brands will help clear up the misconceptions and urban legends surrounding absinthe.
posted by pziemba at 9:42 AM on December 5, 2007


a combination of ill-informed science and the strength of the temperance movement

Not to mention that absinthe gained a massive amount of popularity in France, leading to the production of a lot of low-quality labels. Many of these used heavy metals to achieve a louche effect. It's theorized that some of the reputation of absinthe at the time stems actually from heavy metal poisoning.

Not to mention the fact that it is a fucking stiff drink. It has a very high proof. People who were drinking it multiple times every day were likely suffering not from "absenthism" but from DT's.
posted by kaseijin at 9:46 AM on December 5, 2007


WTG me, starting two thoughts with "Not to mention."

WTG me, starting two thoughts with "Not to mention."
posted by kaseijin at 9:47 AM on December 5, 2007


Since Absinthe was legalized earlier this year...

The laws surrounding Absinthe haven't changed. You're just a victim of clever marketing.

What's changed is that now a distiller can make absinthe, then remove the thujone, and sell it in the US as "absinthe". The product must be tested by the department of the treasury, and must contain less than 10ppm thujone.

That is a somewhat different drink than you get when you go to the UK or Mexico and get a bottle of Absinthe.
posted by toxic at 9:50 AM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


thujone... has long been considered the cause of the drink's supposed side effects: hallucinations, artistic inspiration, degeneracy and homicidal mania.

Big deal. Whiskey does the same thing if you're drinking it right.*



*Right before breakfast, right after lunch, right before bedtime, etc.
posted by Mister_A at 9:55 AM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


That is a somewhat different drink than you get when you go to the UK or Mexico and get a bottle of Absinthe.

That may be true, and I've certainly seen websites advertise "high thujone" absinthe, but I guess my question is - why is that preferable?

I guess this gets into the sticky argument of what 'real' absinthe is, which something tells me is probably very hotly debated amongst those absinthe-heads out there. It seems to me you could make a pretty convincing argument that absinthe was never really about the thujone, and furthermore (though I can't find the references offhand), I've read that 'authentic' absinthe never really had that much thujone to begin with.

Could the high thujone absinthes that some distillers produce these days just be a byproduct of the myths and legends surrounding it?

Personally, I'm looking forward to a market for absinthe where distillers forget about thujone and just focus on what makes a delicious and enjoyable glass. I'm heartened that such respected and meticulous distillers (Ted Breaux, Lance Winters) are pushing the drink in this direction.
posted by pziemba at 10:05 AM on December 5, 2007


I haven't tried the new legal variety, but I doubted it's the real deal (hope I'm wrong on that, but at $60 a bottle I can wait to find out). What I would use that stuff for if I was flush, is to give a bit of a more palatable complex flavor to a homemade batch (which usually will work but often tastes foul).

This homemade recipe looks about right, although I've also heard you can also use Pernod and wormwood.

but the hallucinogenic effects came on in full-force.

Yes. But they can also creep up on you stealthily, especially if you're mixing with other alcohol or stuff (i.e., roll able), so steady as she goes and don't under any circumstances drive and make that decision before hand because afterwards YOU WILL feel like you're a lot more in control than you think you are.
posted by Skygazer at 10:09 AM on December 5, 2007


What's changed is that now a distiller can make absinthe, then remove the thujone, and sell it in the US as "absinthe".

I'm pretty sure that distillation, as practiced by pre-ban absinthe makers, removed the thujone.
posted by exogenous at 10:11 AM on December 5, 2007


That may be true, and I've certainly seen websites advertise "high thujone" absinthe, but I guess my question is - why is that preferable?

Well, it's preferable because it sells to folks like the kids over on Erowid and at Burning Man.

Skygazer and dead_: I have no doubt that you tripped out on some nasty homebrew, but you both seem to have been a bit of a victim of the mythology of this drink. Absinthe *needs* to be properly distilled in order to remove the bitterness of the wormwood - you can't just steep some herbs in vodka and expect anything even approximating the real deal.
posted by kaseijin at 10:18 AM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


Just to echo the previous word of warning, do not buy "Absente". Yes it has a Van Gogh on the box, and it comes with a spoon but unless you REALLY LOVE (Yeah, probably in a fetishistic manner) black licorice, it's really nasty to smell and taste.

Actually had someone who was going to vomit just from smelling it, not even tasting it.
posted by Talanvor at 10:20 AM on December 5, 2007


Toxic is absolutely correct here. Absinthe is still illegal, kinda sorta.

Possession or consumption of Absinthe in America is legal. But if you have it, you've either Note that I said "Distilled" up there. If you're adding herbs and wormwood to vodka, it technically isn't Absinthe.

I love Absinthe, and find it very complex and really enjoy the history that comes with it. However, there are many folks out there (read: most Czech distillers) who can and do take advantage of people's ignorance regarding the drink. Absinthe is really a drink you want to research before you purchase.
posted by AccidentalHedonist at 10:21 AM on December 5, 2007 [2 favorites]


Could the high thujone absinthes that some distillers produce these days just be a byproduct of the myths and legends surrounding it?

I don't think there is any question that the high-thujone absinthes are manufactured in a deliberate and unscrupulous attempt to capitalize on the thujone myth.
posted by malocchio at 10:24 AM on December 5, 2007


Well said, AccidentalHedonist.
posted by kaseijin at 10:24 AM on December 5, 2007


And no.... you cannot combine Pernod and wormwood, or even Barcardi and wormwood to get Absinthe. That's a crime of a different nature.
posted by AccidentalHedonist at 10:25 AM on December 5, 2007


AccidentalHedonist, by saying that absinthe is still illegal to buy here in the states, are you saying that Lucid & Kubler & this new St. George absinthe aren't 'real' absinthe?

My understanding is that what's illegal is to buy/sell in the states a distilled spirit with > 10ppm thujone. If original absinthes from the 19th and early 20th century didn't even contain this amount, and for example Lucid is based on one of these recipes, as reverse engineered by its creator, then wouldn't Lucid would be an 'authentic', legal absinthe?
posted by pziemba at 10:58 AM on December 5, 2007


This is what I gather from places like the Wormwood Society:

Absinthe was never specifically prohibited in the United States; however, any drink containing thujone *was* prohibited in the United States. This effectively "banned" absinthe.

This law hasn't changed. However, it has been recently discovered that the tests' margin of error was 10ppm. Effectively, this means that any absinthe that has 10ppm or less was now legal.

Thujone is an overhyped aspect of absinthe, not terribly active at the concentration in even the most thujone-heavy absinthe. Closer investigation of the absinthe scandal reveals a moral panic that parallels the Prohibition movement of the day in general.

Some manufacturers (including a seemingly disproportionate amount of Eastern Europe manufacturers of lower quality) deliberately spike the thujone content, however, precisely because there is a misconception that thujone was a very big deal. The absinthe forums are very negative against this crowd, dubbing them"Czechsinthe" and other terms.

I have tried Jade and Kubler, and they are pretty good for what they are -- its very "herbal" in the way it seems other old timey cocktails were. I have not tasted genuine absinthe to know whether it is the same or different than the real thing, but it seems like the new distillers are doing the best that they can to revive ths drink.
posted by soundwave106 at 11:01 AM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


Nothing has changed. Absinthe, as long as it's thujone-free (which most are), is perfectly legal in the United States. However, it's illegal to transport it through customs. This is a silly and stupid law, which resulted in my bottle getting snatched when I came back from Spain, and which will probably result in these people making lots of money.
posted by koeselitz at 11:27 AM on December 5, 2007


kaseijin: I'll stick to importing my Jade.

How, exactly, are you able to get Absinthe legally imported into the United States? Inquiring minds would like to know.
posted by koeselitz at 11:29 AM on December 5, 2007


Also, a citation: "The importation of Absinthe and any other liquors or liqueurs that contain Artemisia absinthium is prohibited." A silly Customs rule, but one which effectively prohibits importation, though having and drinking in the US is legal.
posted by koeselitz at 11:32 AM on December 5, 2007


I love a good glass of absinthe in the evening and I do appreciate the good imported stuff the most even though the exchange rates and shipping are horrible. I have tried the Kubler and Lucid and they are OK but I prefer a nice French os Swiss verte. A good absinthe, properly prepared is such an elegant drink.
posted by Iron Rat at 11:33 AM on December 5, 2007


Setting aside the moral panic/artistes-gone-wild aspect, absinthe is a very pleasant drink, especially outdoors in the setting sun.
posted by aramaic at 11:35 AM on December 5, 2007


Pzeimba,

I should have been clearer on my statement. Soundwave106 has done a better job than I in explaining it.

Buying absinthe is not illegal. Buying something loaded with tujone is.

However, the precedent for making tujone illegal was the prohibition of Absinthe in 1912. Absinthe was illegal in the States, both in production and sales, until 1972. The FDA then clarified the rule a bit, making it a "Tujone" issue, rather than an "Absinthe" one. As SW106 noted , this Tujone ban essentially banned Absinthe by default.
posted by AccidentalHedonist at 11:36 AM on December 5, 2007


Koeselitz, it is ordered over the net and brought into the country by flying monkeys. The first rule of importing is do not talk about importing.
posted by Iron Rat at 11:38 AM on December 5, 2007 [2 favorites]


Skygazer and dead_: I have no doubt that you tripped out on some nasty homebrew, but you both seem to have been a bit of a victim of the mythology of this drink. Absinthe *needs* to be properly distilled in order to remove the bitterness of the wormwood - you can't just steep some herbs in vodka and expect anything even approximating the real deal.

Yeah, we kind of suspected this ourselves as we made it :)
posted by dead_ at 11:39 AM on December 5, 2007


I think anyone with a passing knowledge of Absinthe will state that the laws surrounding it are almost all archaic and based on ignorance.

Additionally, anyone with a passing knowledge of Absinthe will also state that the "drug" romanticism surrounding it is also archaic and based on ignorance.
posted by AccidentalHedonist at 11:39 AM on December 5, 2007


The green fairy is an asshole.

But I would still love to try absinthe, I'm just suspecting that it won't live up to the hype.
posted by quin at 11:40 AM on December 5, 2007


So, for people who have tried it, what exactly is an absinthe trip like? Fun? Scary? Non-existent?
posted by Avenger at 11:41 AM on December 5, 2007


Avenger:

Non-existent would probably be the *most* approximate way to describe it. If you've ever noticed a slightly "different drunk" between different varieties of alcohol (say between whiskey and tequila), then you might pick up on it some.

There is a definite stimulant effect due to the herbal content which, when coupled with the depressant effect of alcohol, seems to create a slight "push-pull" effect that most other traditional drinks lack. I think this is what gives absinthe the reputation for providing a "lucid" drunk - you're definitely affected by the alcohol, but you're a bit more alert than you would expect to be and so perceive the normal effects of alcohol a bit differently than you would if you were falling down shitfaced.

Interestingly, you can get a similar feeling from many of the newer alcohol/stimulant drinks (vodka and red bull, blasters, sparks)... which is part of why I suspect that this is the cause.

Any real amount of that effect noticed, though, depends on many things... mood, food in stomach, rate of drinking... and is equally apt to be entirely psychosomatic. As for me personally, eh, sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn't - it's not why I like the drink. When it does happen, it just seems like colors seem maybe a bit more saturated. Again though, that could be all in my noggin.

The real reason to drink it, of course, is that - when made correctly - it's a very pleasant and refreshing drink, which has a relaxing and anachronistic ritual associated with its preparation. In essence, it tastes good, and it's classy, sophisticated, and fun!
posted by kaseijin at 11:54 AM on December 5, 2007 [2 favorites]


But hallucinations? Green fairies? Wallpaper peeling off of walls? Hell no.
posted by kaseijin at 11:55 AM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


Additionally, anyone with a passing knowledge of Absinthe will also state that the "drug" romanticism surrounding it is also archaic and based on ignorance.

Couldn't agree more, AccidentalHedonist.

Quin - best to try and put the hype aside. So much of the modern image of absinthe is inflated, misguided rumors which I bet are due in large part to the long lasting ban. It's really not nearly that mysterious or nefarious.

Think of absinthe not as a vector for some special psychoactive experience but rather just as a more complex anise-y drink like Pernod or Pastis (which incidentally are descendants of absinthe, created in their present form as a result of the absinthe ban in Europe). It's really exciting to see a proliferation of quality modern absinthes, because this drink's beauty is in its subtleties. Much like gin, it's a delicate dance between lots of different exciting botanicals/herbs, and a well crafted absinthe is sublime. There's nothing like slowly sipping a glass outside on a nice summer afternoon. It's easy to see the allure it had in the Belle Époque, what with its pleasant ritual and enchanting taste.

Hopefully, a few years from now when we have lots more quality absinthes on the market here in the states, we'll have gotten away from this distasteful focus on the drink as some kind of illicit drug, and instead we'll treat it just like another great distilled spirit.
posted by pziemba at 11:59 AM on December 5, 2007


Avenger, here's the best way I can describe my absinthe experiences: You know how wine has a different buzz from whiskey, and how they are both different from tequila? Absinthe gives yet another variation on the alcohol buzz, one which is slightly more lucid and clear-headed from all the others. It's absolutely nothing like tripping on a real hallucinogenic, and not much to write home about.

But that's only half the story. I enjoy the ritual and all the minutiae that is related...slowly dripping ice-cold water into the absinthe, watching the oils swirl and cloud in the glass, smelling the bouquet as the room fills with the aroma of alpine herbs. To me, absinthe is one of life's more nuanced pleasures.
posted by malocchio at 12:01 PM on December 5, 2007


There is no real trip to it unless you are drinking horrible poison grade stuff or having so much you get alcohol poisoning.
If you just have a couple it should be just a more clearheaded kind of drunk as the herbs tend to counterbalance the sedative affects of the alcohol. No hallucinations or anything like that.
It is pretty subtle so you may not notice anything.
One real danger of this is you may feel perfectly sober but if you have to take a breathalyser you will be in trouble.
posted by Iron Rat at 12:02 PM on December 5, 2007


It's also worth noting, since pzlemba post above reminded me of this:

One of the very best things about drinking a glass of absinthe on a hot day is the smell. The slow drip really causes a bloom of scent in a room, and it's a fragrant, meadowy smell that just totally enhances your appreciation of the drink once it's ready to drink.
posted by kaseijin at 12:02 PM on December 5, 2007


And once again, I find myself increasingly thirsty. These threads always have a negative effect on my reserves.
posted by malocchio at 12:09 PM on December 5, 2007


Vast review databases are available at a few places, but if anyone here would care to post recommendations for a good, entry-level experience with absinthe, I'd surely appreciate it.
posted by jquinby at 12:10 PM on December 5, 2007


For an entry absinthe, I would suggest either Verte de Fougerolles or Un Emile. Both are relatively inexpensive and taste good for the price. Opinions vary, however.

After some of that, I would suggest any of the Jade varieties - but they're a good bit pricier, so save that until you'll appreciate it. To date, Jade's Nouvelle Orleans is my far and away favorite.

Steer clear of anything Czech or Spanish.
posted by kaseijin at 12:14 PM on December 5, 2007 [2 favorites]


I concur with the Verte de Fougerolles recommendation (I haven't tried Un Emile). Duplais Verte is highly regarded and has a beautiful color (and the price is reasonable), but personally I prefer the VdF. I am also partial to Eichelberger and Montmartre, although they are outliers in terms of the "typical" absinthe flavorings, and may not be the best choice to begin with.

Steer clear of anything Czech or Spanish.

Repeated for emphasis.
posted by malocchio at 12:32 PM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


Malocchio—

Before Xmas?
posted by klangklangston at 12:36 PM on December 5, 2007


My own POV is different from Kaeijin's in that I would rather start with a known commodity of high quality, so that I know where to set my own benchmark of comparison. I do agree with him on the Jade Varieties. My first Absinthe was a Jade Verte Suisse 65º. It was absolutely worth the 100+ dollars I paid for it (after shipping).
posted by AccidentalHedonist at 12:41 PM on December 5, 2007 [1 favorite]


Oh... and as far as the Czech stuff? You'll get a better absinthe experience by eating fennel and slamming vodka shooters.
posted by AccidentalHedonist at 12:42 PM on December 5, 2007


Definitely klang! The monkey has already crossed the pond, so probably in the next couple of days.
posted by malocchio at 12:48 PM on December 5, 2007


Skygazer and dead_: I have no doubt that you tripped out on some nasty homebrew, but you both seem to have been a bit of a victim of the mythology of this drink. Absinthe *needs* to be properly distilled in order to remove the bitterness of the wormwood - you can't just steep some herbs in vodka and expect anything even approximating the real deal.

Yes, well it's a guerrilla method at best. I would love to drink Absinthe for the taste a (looking out upon the lush gardens of my Florentine palace listening to Coleridge as the sun sets etc), but it ain't going to happen. It's either the homebrew or a quick shot of the good stuff like some excellent French variety brought over by a friend. It was nice (no bitterness), andthe feeling was approximate to the homebrew.

So, for people who have tried it, what exactly is an absinthe trip like? Fun? Scary? Non-existent?
posted by Avenger at 2:41 PM on December 5 [+] [!]


It's a very strange high. There is that sense that you're tasting yet another variety of alcohol with a unique buzz (the way a Whiskey is different from Vodka for example), but with Absinthe I always have the sense that I'm a bit more revved up than I realize, my vision sharpens (or maybe it's just colors) with an overall dreamlike quality.

You're supposed to wake up without a hangover if you don't mix it with other alcohol.
posted by Skygazer at 2:12 PM on December 5, 2007


I've been interested in trying it, but have had trouble sorting through the layers and layers of hype. Ideally, I'd like to see someone sell a sampler pack of the smaller bottles, so I can get an idea of what Lucid, Kubler, Jade, and maybe some other of the Swiss and French are like, rather than blowing an exorbitant sum on a bottle there's a good chance I might never finish. As much as I like the various forums devoted to absinthe and appreciate the research, there's just no accounting for taste.

Oh, yeah, and I'd like to try that mandrake liquor, because I suspect that would be mildly hallucinogenic. And maybe some bug powder, I hear that's a very literary high.
posted by adipocere at 2:56 PM on December 5, 2007


adipocere: You actually can get small sampler (like on an airplane) bottles of many labels. I don't think you can from Jade, but I know you can get Un Emile, Oxygenee, and Libertine.

Problem is, the small bottles can be tricky to find. There is an absinthe shop in Paris called Vert d'Absinthe. The owner there stocks several of the trial bottles, speaks good english, and could probably help you out if you emailed him.
posted by kaseijin at 3:28 PM on December 5, 2007


Additionally, anyone with a passing knowledge of Absinthe will also state that the "drug" romanticism surrounding it is also archaic and based on ignorance.

not to mention that absinthe makes the art world wonder
posted by pyramid termite at 5:23 PM on December 5, 2007 [3 favorites]


Absinthe does not live up to the hype, and thank God. It's a classic ingredient in the bartender's arsenal, essentially for making any number of terrific historic drinks, and I welcome the return of well-made absinthe for that purpose. But everybody wants it to be some magical artsy dream fluid, and, if it really were, it would never be allowed into the US -- the laws would be tightened.

Let's get it into the country, get it onto liquor store shelves, and get people used to drinking it again to the point where it loses its preposterous mystique. Then we can get back to drinking it like civilized people, in civilized drinks, like the original sazerac and the absinthe frappe.
posted by Astro Zombie at 5:30 PM on December 5, 2007


Aye, I was under the impression that the whole hallucinatory aspect of absinthe was mostly bunk, and only could occur after years and years of heavy abuse which leads to a buildup up toxins in the brain. C/D?
posted by lazaruslong at 7:14 PM on December 5, 2007


lazaruslong - I am presently researching that and will let you know when the results are in.
posted by Iron Rat at 7:50 PM on December 5, 2007


1. Absinthe does not cause hallucinations.

2. Thujone-induced hallucinations are a myth invented a long time ago amongst teetotalling ninnies.

3. Absinthe from Czechoslovakia is not really absinthe at all. It is sewer water and isn't fit for donkeys.

4. Decent absinthe can be purchased from these people and couriered into the U.S. for a semi-reasonable price.

5. Absinthe is the finest, most precious thing a person can drink, ever. When I am destitute, in my cups, weeping bitterly over the some lost love or existential crisis, I sip cool Jagermeister with water and close my eyes and try to remember that one, sweet evening in Iquitos... her black hair and fine features, her delicate hands and the drink that nearly cost me my passport.
posted by Baby_Balrog at 10:28 PM on December 5, 2007


Absente is pretty nasty. An ex bought me a bottle as a sort of going away present. My profile pic is from the box.

kaseijin nothing wrong with black jellybeans;)

Talanvor black licorice is there any other kind?
posted by Sailormom at 11:02 AM on December 6, 2007


Alameda distiller helps make absinthe legitimate again: Starting December 21 St. George Spirits' absinthe will be $75 for a 750ml bottle at limited liquor stores.

"St. George will compete with three other absinthe distillers - the Swiss Kubler, French Lucid and the Brazilian Absinto Camargo. All have begun importing the licorice-flavored spirit into the United States in recent months."
posted by kirkaracha at 12:37 PM on December 6, 2007


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