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He didn’t pay attention to man’s law or God’s law
March 21, 2008 11:58 AM   Subscribe

From the diamond to the street (literally) to your mailbox, one thing is absolutely certain: Nails never fails.
posted by Horace Rumpole (18 comments total)

 
Looks likes he's been hit by a truck. Several trucks. Sad.
posted by Dizzy at 12:08 PM on March 21, 2008


He's not one to sit around in his "retirement."

1986 was such a very good year.
posted by caddis at 12:24 PM on March 21, 2008


It's a baseball player turned businessman.

</M.Night Shyamalan>
posted by DU at 12:24 PM on March 21, 2008


Dykstra's a lunatic, but he's obviously a hell of a businessman. While I can't say I admire the kind of singular obsession with money the New Yorker piece indicates, the fact that he's basically going into the business of selling financial services to athletes is really interesting. I get the sense that many (certainly not all, and probably not even a majority) are a bit like lottery winners on a grand scale, in that they're entirely unprepared for this time-limited income stream that must seem bottomless while it's flowing. Obviously he stands to make money from the venture, but I get the impression that he really hates to see these guys ruin their lives with bad financial planning and wants to help them out.
posted by uncleozzy at 12:30 PM on March 21, 2008


Jim Cramer calls him "One of the great ones." Not the most articulate or educated fellow, but I guess he has a way with money.
posted by Frank Grimes at 12:35 PM on March 21, 2008


Sports Illustrated and Chris Ballard weren't very complimentary of the venture, or him.
posted by incessant at 12:38 PM on March 21, 2008


I found Dykstra to be such a tool, always talking about his money and his house and his address and his lifestyle like he's the world's first ever high roller. But I just couldn't stop reading it. Great article.
posted by sneakin at 12:48 PM on March 21, 2008


I get the sense that many (certainly not all, and probably not even a majority) are a bit like lottery winners on a grand scale, in that they're entirely unprepared for this time-limited income stream that must seem bottomless while it's flowing.

There was a piece on (I think) Radio 4 recently, about a UK footballer who set up a clinic to treat sportsmen with various addictions, which came to much the same conclusion. You give a 19-year-old kid access to ridiculous amounts of money, it's no surprise if they go a bit non-linear. Yeah, here we go. Sporting Chance
posted by Leon at 12:54 PM on March 21, 2008


NAILS!
posted by Divine_Wino at 1:05 PM on March 21, 2008


I had no idea Nails had a financial advice column. Next, I look forward to reading Wally Backman's trenchant analysis of agricultural subsidies in Burkina Faso.
posted by dersins at 1:07 PM on March 21, 2008 [1 favorite]


Maybe we don't need to care what Jim Cramer thinks about anything since he has a serious credibility problem.
posted by found missing at 1:20 PM on March 21, 2008


Dude, the lesson here is major league. Its the Show. Live life in the fast lane not the passing lane. He did and does what it takes to be successful at what he is doing and it seems as if he likes what he does.

He has a very forgiving and patient family.
posted by JohnnyGunn at 1:24 PM on March 21, 2008


*looking at paycheck*
*reading article*
*looking at paycheck*

....sigh
posted by not_on_display at 2:01 PM on March 21, 2008


1986 was such a very good year.

Yeah, baby! I don't give a fuck how much of a tool Lenny is (and he does sound like somebody I wouldn't want to spend more than two minutes around), I still worship the ground he spits on. What a joy it was to see him beat out a hit!
posted by languagehat at 2:11 PM on March 21, 2008


And this raises the value of his rookie card by how much, now?
posted by jabberjaw at 5:20 PM on March 21, 2008


It's worth about eight bucks. Good thing he went into finance. Although, now I might buy one.
posted by caddis at 8:29 PM on March 21, 2008


Next, I look forward to reading Wally Backman's trenchant analysis of agricultural subsidies in Burkina Faso

Wally, while taking a break from managing another spring with the Joliet Jackhammers, uses his Blackberry ('the best phone thing') to explain to MeFi that the subsidies are a necessary evil due to Washington's ongoing subsidies for US cotton growers... but he's willing to defer to the WTO for arbitration. Also, he wants a hot tub in the clubhouse.
posted by rokusan at 12:08 PM on March 22, 2008


If he plays finances the same way he played baseball, he could just as easily end up broke and in jail. Fortunately for him, juicing is allowed and forgivable in baseball.
posted by crazy finger at 2:21 PM on March 22, 2008


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