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March 28, 2008 5:58 PM   Subscribe

The Most Horrible English Words
posted by chuckdarwin (124 comments total) 13 users marked this as a favorite

 
"moist"
posted by Auden at 6:00 PM on March 28, 2008 [9 favorites]


Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis
Sweet. I found a name for my sock puppet account.
posted by spikeleemajortomdickandharryconnickjrmints at 6:02 PM on March 28, 2008 [3 favorites]


Long words are horrible?

I think this guy has hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia...

(BOO!)
posted by Rhaomi at 6:08 PM on March 28, 2008


When I was in 6th grade, as punishment for misdeeds, my homeroom/math teacher would assign people Fermi problems (how many nickels would it take to make a stack that reached the moon? How many basketballs to fill the Superdome?) as detention, and you could leave as soon as you got it (or your method was correct). However, one day he was on a vocab kick, and the kid being punished had to spell Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis from memory, in front of the class, and couldn't leave until he did it. It took him about 15 minutes.

Seems harsh when I think back on it, but pretty much everyone in our class thought he was the all kinds of rad.
posted by krippledkonscious at 6:12 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


What, no "panties"?
posted by dersins at 6:22 PM on March 28, 2008


This post is cephaloambulocumulotremolosemioserpicoalamoordinotallyhomelanocriticocalicohohohofabiocorticojackieotacular.
posted by dyoneo at 6:23 PM on March 28, 2008


"digit", "sizzle"
posted by Free word order! at 6:23 PM on March 28, 2008


Floccinaucihihilipilification was the word my old drama teacher used to describe the conversation actors undertook in the background- whiskey and wine whiskey and wine whiskey and wine whiskey and wine
posted by mattoxic at 6:25 PM on March 28, 2008


'cooter' has always made me cringe. not the part of a female it refers to, just the sound. so a Dukes of Hazard is kinda hard to watch. But I suppose that's true for everyone.
posted by dawson at 6:29 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


I'm not a designer, but something is wrong with that font. It should probably be a typographical felony to depict those words without ligatures or serifs. Or are they just unreadable in any form?
posted by BrotherCaine at 6:31 PM on March 28, 2008


whiskey and wine whiskey and wine whiskey and wine whiskey and wine

peas and carrots peas and carrots peas and carrots
posted by ludwig_van at 6:32 PM on March 28, 2008


Queef.
posted by not_on_display at 6:32 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


"Finnegan Wake"?
posted by fish tick at 6:32 PM on March 28, 2008


Actually floccinaucihihilipilification should be spelled floccinaucinihilipilification. Oh, sweet irony.
posted by nomis at 6:34 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


A lot of these words aren't actually words. They're made up, transliterated from other languages, or technical names of chemicals. Antidisestablishmentarianism is the only actual English word there.
posted by Dasein at 6:36 PM on March 28, 2008


Aren't all words made up? Should I cut discombobulated out of my dictionary because it doesn't have a latin/greek derivation?
posted by BrotherCaine at 6:42 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


Whinge
posted by Pyry at 6:43 PM on March 28, 2008


phlegm.
posted by tula at 6:44 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


Flippity-floppety-floop.
posted by papakwanz at 6:49 PM on March 28, 2008


Made even more horrible by a cockamamie web page design that lets the ads/AdBlock frame clip the ends off.
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 6:55 PM on March 28, 2008


christonacrackpipe
posted by mr_book at 6:57 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


It is ridiculous to count long systemic names for macromolecules as the longest words. Why stop at a 267–amino-acid word of 1913 characters when you could make a word to describe human chromosome 1 with more than a billion characters.
posted by grouse at 7:04 PM on March 28, 2008 [3 favorites]


Stupid.

The one that I hate is "eviscerate". It has the benefit of being, you know, an actual word. And every time I hear it, I can feel the blade tearing through soft belly flesh... and the entrails spilling out like overstuffed bloody sausages...

uh, why are you looking at me like that?
posted by Justinian at 7:07 PM on March 28, 2008 [2 favorites]


Syzygy.
posted by cashman at 7:08 PM on March 28, 2008 [2 favorites]


'audit'
posted by jonmc at 7:10 PM on March 28, 2008 [3 favorites]


When I was in third grade I got super into the word pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, repeating it in my head and attempting to memorize the spelling almost as if it was, in itself, totemic of intelligence.

Years later I learned the word was just a satire of 1920s style overlycompoundedmedicaljargon and not a membership password for the Awesome Brainiacs Society, I discovered that my childhood was a decade of fail.
posted by bunnytricks at 7:10 PM on March 28, 2008 [4 favorites]


"No"
posted by ooga_booga at 7:11 PM on March 28, 2008


Eviscerate is a nice word. It's almost poetic in the way its form is so close to what it actually describes - squishy!

Meh, still - not really "Best of the web" - chemical names shouldn't count as "horrible" words, they're purely functional and their meaning isn't particularly inspiring the way "eviscerate" is.
posted by WalterMitty at 7:11 PM on March 28, 2008


"Yummy" used by anyone over the age of five.
posted by Lucinda at 7:15 PM on March 28, 2008 [2 favorites]


Aren't all words made up?

I think what Dasein meant is that they were made up out of thin air for a frivolous use, e.g. Shakespeare or Joyce showing off their verbal inventiveness in a particular work. Someone sat down and said, "Gee, I'd love to come up with a super-long word. OK, here goes...!"

If that's what "made up" means, then no, most words aren't made up. Usually when we talk about "words," we're talking about things that are actually in use by some people for some period of time. Many of the "words" in this list are only ever "used" for the purpose of saying, "Wow, look what a long word this is!"

Have you ever seen any of these words (even "antidisestablishmentarianism" ... ooh, I just spelled that by memory, I'm awesome) used for their straightforward meanings, rather than referred to as long words? I mean, really, even if you were seriously talking or writing about opposition to the withdrawal of state support for an established church (or whatever it means), would you even consider using "antidisestablishmentarianism," aside from as a joke?
posted by jejune at 7:19 PM on March 28, 2008 [5 favorites]


This word is terribly long in its length

That is practically poetic in its stupidity.
posted by Rock Steady at 7:20 PM on March 28, 2008 [2 favorites]


Also, Ms Rock Steady has an almost physical reaction to the word "meal."
posted by Rock Steady at 7:22 PM on March 28, 2008


"undulate"
posted by troubles at 7:26 PM on March 28, 2008


For balance; The Most Beautiful Words in the English Language.
posted by Effigy2000 at 7:26 PM on March 28, 2008 [2 favorites]


My favorite sesquipedalianism is 'antepenultimate', a melodious utterance used melodiously only in Have Some Madiera M'Dear, as far as I know. But what a sublime chevisance!

But the brobdingnagian blobs in the linked article? Trash!
posted by hexatron at 7:32 PM on March 28, 2008 [3 favorites]


chunk
pulp
cookie
"sammich" as a short version of sandwich

Also, why is there no non-gross word for testicles? Like, something you could huskily whisper in a lover's ear when suggesting certain sexual acts and not break up laughing? Balls, sac, testicles and nuts just aren't sexy.
posted by loiseau at 7:33 PM on March 28, 2008 [5 favorites]


And of course - brdtfklmghrkwtfnylkpqwqrtdfplmkqkwqqqqqqqqqqqqstfjrqmtsdtqmprftdpdpmhrktbtf.
posted by cashman at 7:35 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


Those are not English. No one I know who speaks that language uses them, so they are not English. I can't spell them. I can't define them. So they are not English. Be gone.
posted by VicNebulous at 7:38 PM on March 28, 2008


The word comprises of 34 letters. This word appeared in a movie called “Marry Poppins”, which means “good.”

Conveniently, we are also provided examples of the most horrible English sentence constructions.
posted by transient at 7:39 PM on March 28, 2008 [2 favorites]


Why does everyone hate the word "moist" so much? Invariably, when the topic of conversation turns to awful words, that is the first one, and the most universally disliked. All the more fun for me when I say it over and over again, to watch people who have tormented me with "orientate" squirm and cringe.

And "No" is an extremely important word, one of the most important. It establishes standards and boundaries. A judiciously applied "NO" can spare everyone lots of trouble and heartache, and everyone should be versed in its use. Without it, "Yes" has no meaning.
posted by louche mustachio at 7:41 PM on March 28, 2008 [3 favorites]


I've used antepenultimate in a sentence before, hexatron. It's the best word to describe the 2nd to last.
posted by MythMaker at 7:42 PM on March 28, 2008


The nicest English words:

Cellar door.
posted by Samuel Farrow at 7:43 PM on March 28, 2008


Also, why is there no non-gross word for testicles? Like, something you could huskily whisper in a lover's ear when suggesting certain sexual acts and not break up laughing? Balls, sac, testicles and nuts just aren't sexy.

Well, have you looked at the damn things recently?
posted by louche mustachio at 7:43 PM on March 28, 2008 [3 favorites]


Cave men gathered around the fire in an age-old bonding ritual:
"Don't you just hate rancid meat? This piece is really disgusting--here, taste it."
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium at 7:46 PM on March 28, 2008 [2 favorites]


Also, why is there no non-gross word for testicles?

Also also, how about about a word for breasts that doesn't make me feel like a slightly silly 12-year-old when I say it?
posted by Rock Steady at 7:51 PM on March 28, 2008


Why does everyone hate the word "moist" so much? Invariably, when the topic of conversation turns to awful words, that is the first one, and the most universally disliked. All the more fun for me when I say it over and over again, to watch people who have tormented me with "orientate" squirm and cringe.
There are discussion groups devoted to hating this word, and some sort of network against it on Facebook or MySpace. It must be genetic.
posted by etaoin at 7:59 PM on March 28, 2008


how about about a word for breasts that doesn't make me feel like a slightly silly 12-year-old when I say it?


Don't blame words for this.
posted by poppo at 7:59 PM on March 28, 2008 [5 favorites]


crux
doily
lugubrious
phlegmatic
posted by oflinkey at 8:01 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


"audit"

No, I'm sorry; that's a beautiful, wonderful, fee-mendous word.
posted by yhbc at 8:04 PM on March 28, 2008


Metafilter: A decade of fail.
posted by Rangeboy at 8:05 PM on March 28, 2008 [5 favorites]


lurve.
posted by emelenjr at 8:05 PM on March 28, 2008


I've used antepenultimate in a sentence before, hexatron. It's the best word to describe the 2nd to last.
posted by MythMaker at 7:42 PM on March 28


Sadly, no. Antepenultimate means the 3rd to last. X is the antepenultimate letter of the alphabet.; Y is the penultimate.
posted by wilsona at 8:12 PM on March 28, 2008 [2 favorites]


meh.
posted by washburn at 8:13 PM on March 28, 2008


bucolic
posted by subgear at 8:29 PM on March 28, 2008


Tangentially related: four Language Log posts about word aversion.

As well as a Monty Python sketch (via) about it.
posted by Weebot at 8:30 PM on March 28, 2008 [2 favorites]


I think that the last one - spelling out tryptophan synthase using amino acid names - is a bit of a crock. Why tryptophan synthase and not some other random protein?
posted by porpoise at 8:33 PM on March 28, 2008


Also also, how about about a word for breasts that doesn't make me feel like a slightly silly 12-year-old when I say it?

I'm fairly certain that's because all of those words were coined by 12 year old boys. Except maybe bosom, but that just makes you sound like a hackneyed paperback romance author.
posted by Weebot at 8:41 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


Also, why is there no non-gross word for testicles?

Sounds like you've got an idea for a metafilter project! I look forward to the new word.

I propose: lovetanks, cream-cartons, netherbrains, seminarovoids, gametricals, and um... tadpole-factory.
posted by BrotherCaine at 8:43 PM on March 28, 2008 [4 favorites]


encephalopothy, webinar, spigot
posted by carsonb at 8:43 PM on March 28, 2008


I'm sorry, but antidisestablishmentarianism is not a horrible English word. It's been one of my favorites for along time, probably because I learned to spell it at a young age, when my mom first taught it to me.
posted by SpacemanStix at 8:43 PM on March 28, 2008


tendon, pus, leakage, chancre
posted by isopraxis at 8:52 PM on March 28, 2008


antidisistablishmentarianism has always been one of my favourite words (ever since I was about 7... when I was able to pronounce it) and I usually bragged about it with a nice long definition of what it was. Usually to a wall, because the people I was talking to would walk away bored, but still...

I think we should find a site with the most horrible GERMAN words. now THOSE would be some loooooong words.
posted by Planet F at 8:54 PM on March 28, 2008


The linked article contains many of the most horrible English sentences it has ever been my misfortune to behold. For example: "This word is terribly long in its length as it comprises of 1913 letters as follow:" The other articles in the "writing > style" sections are equally terrible.
This Writinghood is not a very good website.
posted by nowonmai at 9:10 PM on March 28, 2008


These words are made up or are unnecessarily long. A real, minimum-length-for-concept word is pseudopseudohyperparathyroidism.
posted by neuron at 9:13 PM on March 28, 2008


I think that the last one - spelling out tryptophan synthase using amino acid names - is a bit of a crock

i know it's a crock - i defy anyone to say that word without having to take a breath or dropping dead due to lack of oxygen

if you can't say it in one breath, it ain't a word
posted by pyramid termite at 9:16 PM on March 28, 2008


This was quite stupid, and author seems to be fairly illiterate. I didn't bother to check OED for some of them, and I suspect that the Greek thing may be because of lack of punctuation in classical Greek, and really... how interesting are laboratory science's neologisms? Yawn.
posted by yazi at 9:17 PM on March 28, 2008


antidisestablishmentarianism is a GREAT word. I will always think of it fondly, as it reminds me of the week we spent dissecting it in my morphology class while I was studying linguistics for my undergrad at Cal. We broke it down into its many parts, and learned why each morpheme in a word is necessary to understand the meaning of the word as a whole. Like peeling back an onion, each layer being at once a part of, and an addition to, the very heart of what it is. And the neat thing about this particular word is that the "heart" is ambiguous still. Is the root "establish", or "establishment"?

It reminds me of "undo-able" or "un-doable". Is it able to be undone, or not able to be done?

English is cool.
posted by iamkimiam at 9:27 PM on March 28, 2008 [3 favorites]


Damn, I really wish I'd known, I would have totally picked Selador as my MeFi name. Stupid real name. *grumble*
posted by adamdschneider at 9:29 PM on March 28, 2008


meh
It exemplifies the exact opposite of eloquence.
posted by jouke at 9:53 PM on March 28, 2008


"eviscerate"

This is a fine word, but in my mind the shorter, more Anglo-Saxony words for violence are better. In this case, "gut."
posted by Bookhouse at 9:54 PM on March 28, 2008


bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk!
posted by obvious at 10:23 PM on March 28, 2008


An all-over-the-place thread. And a post with the words antidisestablishmentarianism and supercalifragilisticexpialidocious begs to be ignored.

BUT - I have to mention my mystification on this one: why do so many people hate the word "moist?" That is just too strange.

The word is not unpleasant. Some words are. Like pissy. (Piss is fine. OK....don't know why pissy pisses me off.)

Nice, foggy green moss is moist. Ya gotta problem with that, buddy? Let's take it outside. Oh. We are outside. It's nice out here.

Obviously, a distinction between meaning and sound have to be accounted for. This is a bit complicated for a Metafilter post.

Apparently, "moist" is more of a problem for women than for men. OK. Freudians: have at it.

Also, I found myself in the desert two days ago without hand lotion. (Luckily, I had water, and not Alamosa water, if you are keeping track of SW CO news...) The word "moist" sounded like "manna" to me. Like the linguistically hip realtors say: location, locution, and Lolita.
posted by kozad at 10:32 PM on March 28, 2008 [1 favorite]


Nice, foggy green moss is moist.

No way. Nice, foggy green moss is damp. Crotch rot is moist.
posted by Justinian at 10:43 PM on March 28, 2008 [3 favorites]


Bookhouse - ...n this case, "gut."

Ah, but evoscerate evokes a more sophisticated undertaking and possibly even more in-humane.
posted by porpoise at 11:03 PM on March 28, 2008


wilsona -

duh, you're right, of course. ultimate is last.
posted by MythMaker at 11:11 PM on March 28, 2008


Also, why is there no non-gross word for testicles? Like, something you could huskily whisper in a lover's ear when suggesting certain sexual acts and not break up laughing? Balls, sac, testicles and nuts just aren't sexy.

Scrotum?
posted by sharpener at 11:33 PM on March 28, 2008


After perusing those Language Log posts and hearing all the moist hate, I just wanted to point out that while I have no strong aversion to any words, I take great pleasure in saying and hearing a handful--this may be connected to the "inherently funny word" thing. Some of them are sexual (lesbian, vagina or any combination of the two, especially when said in a silly voice,) some are not. (Watkinson, "Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing.") Maybe it's just good mouthfeel.

Also, I don't find "balls" particularly inappropriate to use during sex--it strikes the right balance of colloquialism and descriptiveness.

Oh, and the original post is awful.
posted by zeusianfog at 11:52 PM on March 28, 2008


Scrotum!
posted by BrotherCaine at 11:55 PM on March 28, 2008


I hate the word ma'am so much that I catch myself awkwardly not using it when addressing female military officers senior to me, when it would be the appropriate thing to say. I don't know what else to say, though.
posted by ctmf at 12:43 AM on March 29, 2008


Do you mean to tell me that it would be sexy to ask, in the heat of the moment, "Do you like it when I suck your scrotum?"

Because there is no way in hell...

"Balls" is the winner but only by a molecule.
posted by loiseau at 12:47 AM on March 29, 2008


There used to be a quiz show on BBC1 that involved making the longest word you could out of a lump of supplied letters. I forget the precise format, in fact the only thing I remember about it really is that what seemed like every second week someone would win with 'antidisestablishmentarianism'. Angela Rippon said it more times than Gladstone.
posted by vbfg at 1:57 AM on March 29, 2008


loiseau: "stones" strikes me as one of the less objectionable choices.

The words this person chose are feculent. Webinar would also grind my stones, had I any. And yes, there are many disgusting words in medicine and biology, even independent of their meanings: micturate, phlegm, sputum, fistula, hairy nevus, pus, and herpes (although I think syphilis and chancre are quite nice).

For the ultimate in ugly, shudder-inducing disease names, my vote goes to brucella melitensis biovar abortus. It's the perfect combination of sounds and meaning that make me want to ralph.
posted by melissa may at 2:14 AM on March 29, 2008 [1 favorite]


cashman: Syzygy

Hey, now, no need to get personal
posted by syzygy at 2:24 AM on March 29, 2008


A lot of these words aren't actually words. They're made up, transliterated from other languages, or technical names of chemicals. Antidisestablishmentarianism is the only actual English word there.

Uh, How is Floccinaucinihilipilification not a real word?
posted by delmoi at 3:25 AM on March 29, 2008


This is craptacular, in a pustular way.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 3:57 AM on March 29, 2008


"discharge"
posted by triv at 4:12 AM on March 29, 2008


I currently hate "more than", as in "I'd be more than grateful," "you're more than welcome".
posted by paduasoy at 4:47 AM on March 29, 2008


I think we should find a site with the most horrible GERMAN words.
posted by ryanrs at 5:28 AM on March 29, 2008


This was quite stupid, and author seems to be fairly illiterate.

The author, Chan Lee Peng, appears to live in Kuala Lumpur, and I suspect English is not his or her native language. We can do better than making fun of furriners.

We can also do better than this post and thread. A link to a stupid list of a few "long words" is followed by a bunch of irrelevant "words I hate" comments. Sheesh.
posted by languagehat at 5:58 AM on March 29, 2008


I'm sure this will redeem the thread for you, languagehat:

Balls, sac, testicles and nuts just aren't sexy

In Japan, they're often called inari, a reference to inarizushi, a simple type of sushi in which abura-age (deep-fried tofu) bags are filled with sushi rice.
posted by breezeway at 6:26 AM on March 29, 2008 [3 favorites]


Meh. The definition of a bad word shouldn't just be something that's hard to spell; it should be hard to remember, hard to understand. Perhaps something with a meaning that's contrary to the image conjured up by the sound of the word.

I've failed to find anything via Google, so perhaps it's something for Mefi Projects - but it would be much more interesting to have a list of words that sound congruent with their descriptions.
We've had a couple above, but there's plenty of others:
obsequious
smarmy
squamous
grunge

etc.
posted by Chunder at 6:41 AM on March 29, 2008


wacky
zany

also natty, because it means the opposite of what it sounds like it means, and that always confuses me.
posted by rifflesby at 6:49 AM on March 29, 2008


MetaFilter: we can do better than this post and thread
posted by bwg at 6:58 AM on March 29, 2008


I'm sure this will redeem the thread for you, languagehat

It did!
posted by languagehat at 8:05 AM on March 29, 2008


slacks.

just say it with me. slacks. ugh.

also, to whoever said "yummy - when said by anybody older than 5" ==
i beg to differ.... uma thurman can call five dollar milkshakes "yummy" all she wants.

mmm-mmm-mmmmmmmmmmm.
posted by CitizenD at 9:10 AM on March 29, 2008


Meeting.
posted by The Card Cheat at 9:14 AM on March 29, 2008


Wasn't that woman on Firefly name Inara? Now I have a whole 'nother image of her thanks to breezeway...

That said, I didn't mind this site- I'm narcissistic enough to enjoy hearing what foreigners think of my language.
posted by small_ruminant at 9:20 AM on March 29, 2008


verbiage

My hatred of it is definitely due to the context in which I first heard it, overused by a underskilled coworker. Her job was to write, my job was to design, yet she filled my inbox with daily pleas for me to write her "verbiage." I looked it up, it means too many words which say nothing. She thought it meant "advertising copy," creating a metajoke that still makes me giggle each time I think of her.
posted by jamaro at 9:41 AM on March 29, 2008


I agree with everyone complaining about moist. It makes me shudder.

Note that I made this video while drunk WELL over a year ago; sorry about the quality.
posted by Unicorn on the cob at 11:03 AM on March 29, 2008


I think we should find a site with the most horrible GERMAN words.


I couldn't get the link to work, ryanrs, but I'd start small with knockwurst.
Spoken with a New Hampshire accent.

Maybe a separate topic on poorly conceived city names would include Nyack. (Clearly I have issues with "k" and "ck"...)
posted by skyper at 11:05 AM on March 29, 2008


language hat: your chastizing my making a criticism because the writer is foreign is PC and silly. Is it the chore of a reader of an Engl. lang. website to do a biographical search and make sure he doesn't hurt someone's feelings by mentioning that the someone doesn't know a heck of a lot about the language? I mean, for god's sake, the intention was to both show and invite skill in the category of linguistics (or, merely, in the world of English for people who know it and think about it)??

Give mois a break.
posted by yazi at 11:54 AM on March 29, 2008


language hat: your chastizing my making a criticism because the writer is foreign is PC and silly

I disagree, and—ordinarily I wouldn't do this, but you have to admit you're asking for it—you misspelled chastising.
posted by languagehat at 12:33 PM on March 29, 2008


Prolix!

Can't decide if I love it or hate it. But it's nothing a pair of scissors can't fix.
posted by tiny crocodile at 12:40 PM on March 29, 2008


What I find odd, personally, is that this post (which several tenured, snobby mefites found lacking) should have so many comments and favourites. Even better: I found this site via stumbleupon.

Go figure. I guess it was good fodder for a bit of chatfilter.

T

p.s. My old room-mate hated the word 'morsel'.
posted by chuckdarwin at 1:39 PM on March 29, 2008


MythMaker-

One second after posting my comment, I thought to myself, "Wait, maybe people use '2nd to last' differently in different places..." I had to go screaming around to any place I could think of to be sure I wasn't making a fool of myself!
posted by wilsona at 2:50 PM on March 29, 2008


Unicorn on the cob: very cool.
posted by rleamon at 3:11 PM on March 29, 2008


Sixty free sacks of Krispy Kreme donuts for whichever MF user can refrain the longest from the use of the word "utilize".
posted by lometogo at 3:38 PM on March 29, 2008 [2 favorites]


lometogo I HATE that word! Along with all those 90s business-speak words and phrases, like "synergy", and "on a going-forward basis."
posted by small_ruminant at 3:50 PM on March 29, 2008


"smegma"

*gags*
posted by sixcolors at 5:15 PM on March 29, 2008


Those are not English. No one I know who speaks that language uses them, so they are not English. I can't spell them. I can't define them. So they are not English. Be gone.

I'm afraid that that says more about your environment than it does about English. Three I've used (antidisestablishmentarianism seriously, and supercalifragelisticexpialidocious and flaucinocinihilipification* with tongue in cheek). The remainder appear to be a mix of technical terms (which I'll forgive for being long and complex as they tend to also be descriptive) and words made up by people (such as James Joyce) who appear incapable of using the space bar properly. And that last "word" is a theoretical construct rather than an actual word IMO (as for that matter is anything from James Joyce, and the Greek and French imports).

* Spelled from memory...
posted by Francis at 5:55 PM on March 29, 2008


abscission.
posted by sonic meat machine at 5:57 PM on March 29, 2008


Sixty free sacks of Krispy Kreme donuts for whichever MF user can refrain the longest from the use of the word "utilize".

I don't know how anyone could ever utilize that many donuts.
posted by bwg at 6:04 PM on March 29, 2008 [1 favorite]


What a piece of crap. It's not even steaming.
posted by Joseph Gurl at 9:17 PM on March 29, 2008


slacks.

just say it with me. slacks. ugh.


Was just about to post the same word. Can't believe someone beat me to it.
posted by gfrobe at 2:55 AM on March 30, 2008


wilsona -

It's okay, I had to think about it, too. :) Ultimate would be last, penultimate 2nd to last, and antepenultimate 3rd to last. Unless you think of ultimate as being after the end, or some other variant way of thinking...
posted by MythMaker at 8:49 AM on March 30, 2008


> > Also, why is there no non-gross word for testicles?

> Sounds like you've got an idea for a metafilter project! I look forward to the new word.

> I propose: lovetanks, cream-cartons, netherbrains, seminarovoids, gametricals, and um... tadpole-factory.


I read this to my girlfriend. Her response: "No. I think 'Herman.'"
posted by djwudi at 9:44 AM on March 30, 2008


In re. moist:

Her lips were moist and inviting.

Moist, fresh slices of ham and creamy hardboiled eggs are essential for this salad.

Damp does NOT work here.
posted by By The Grace of God at 11:04 AM on March 30, 2008


Greasy, however, does.
posted by breezeway at 12:00 PM on March 30, 2008 [2 favorites]


slough. also, crick.. it always bugged me to hear that as if a perfectly nice word like "creek" won't do.
posted by citron at 12:22 PM on March 30, 2008


also, crick.. it always bugged me to hear that as if a perfectly nice word like "creek" won't do.

And similarly, 'cuss'.
posted by rifflesby at 3:48 PM on March 30, 2008


ThisIsSoLameThatISuspectedASelfLinkWhenUntilISawItWasChuckDarwinWhoHasPostedOtherStuffInThePastAndSeemsOnQuiteTheTearSoNowIAmSimplyAnnoyedAtTheLackOfQualityInThisLinkButStillLikeMostOfTheOthersPlusMostOfThoseAreLikePostingAListOfCoolestSuperherosAndSayingTheInfraredBossWhoIJustMadeUpAndWhoCanDoAnythingEvenBeatBatman.
posted by klangklangston at 4:15 PM on March 30, 2008 [1 favorite]


"Uh… Tea aitch eye ess eye ess…"
posted by klangklangston at 4:17 PM on March 30, 2008


"Efficacy."

It smells like a hospital.
posted by lostburner at 8:15 PM on March 30, 2008


You have to pronounce it "greezy", though.
posted by smartyboots at 12:26 AM on March 31, 2008


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