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William Butler Yeats
May 19, 2008 11:30 AM   Subscribe

The Life and Works of William Butler Yeats - Online Exhibition. [Via]
posted by homunculus (10 comments total) 17 users marked this as a favorite

 
Previous post on Yeats.
posted by homunculus at 11:31 AM on May 19, 2008


Holy crap. Yeats meets Myst? The gyres! This looks like it will take some time to digest.
posted by taliaferro at 12:28 PM on May 19, 2008


Wow that's quite a beautiful resource and looks like an amazing exhibition - have you seen it in person?
posted by blindsam at 12:30 PM on May 19, 2008


...

You got the chance, William,
the chance for your words,
since courage and beauty
had their flagpoles through your side.
You acknowledged them in one way,
but there is an excuse on your lips,
the excuse that did not spoil your poetry,
for every man has his excuse.

-- from Sorley MacLean "At Yeats's Grave."
posted by Abiezer at 1:18 PM on May 19, 2008


Very cool interface. I got a little confused in the twisty-passages, it would be even better with an overhead map showing your location and facing, but still a nice example of the potential of eco-tourism.
posted by stbalbach at 1:23 PM on May 19, 2008


Yeats is amazing. It's a shame that the link in the previous thread appears to be broken.

Some of my favorites:

An Irish Airman foresees his Death
The Song of Wandering Aengus
Cuchulain Comforted
posted by prefpara at 1:47 PM on May 19, 2008


Wow. Awesomeness abounds! Thanks, homunculus!
posted by Lynsey at 2:03 PM on May 19, 2008


It's a shame that the link in the previous thread appears to be broken.

Screw the link, the thread is still one of the best things MetaFilter has produced.
posted by languagehat at 2:10 PM on May 19, 2008


Is it me, or is his voice just a bit too much?
posted by Merwin at 5:52 PM on May 19, 2008


That was a common way of reading/reciting poetry a century ago; poets were seen as bards, not workaday graduates of writing programs, and poems were a higher form of language, not just random thoughts chopped up into lines of varying length. Styles have changed, as they have in performance of classical music; if people today can't adapt to the cadences of a Yeats or Akhmatova or the portamento of the Flonzaley Quartet, it's their loss.
posted by languagehat at 5:39 AM on May 20, 2008


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