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September 4, 2008 10:52 PM   Subscribe

Hurricane Tracker lets you see where the big Atlantic storms are, where they've been, and where they're projected to be.
posted by Dave Faris (32 comments total) 15 users marked this as a favorite

 
There's also this, which is maybe less snazzy, which plots hurricanes on Google Earth.
posted by Class Goat at 11:07 PM on September 4, 2008 [3 favorites]


You can follow the recon flights into tropical storms on google earth as well by using the tools
here.
posted by yertledaturtle at 11:51 PM on September 4, 2008


actually here
posted by yertledaturtle at 11:52 PM on September 4, 2008


Cool! I love these things.

Also, I didn't see Hurricane Ike (unless I missed it). Is it wrong that I'd like to see Hurricane Ike and Hurricane Tina meet up in the Atlantic?
posted by KevinSkomsvold at 11:56 PM on September 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Awesome, its a lot nice looking then the one I had been using before from my local tv station. Although that one does go back further in time.
posted by lilkeith07 at 12:18 AM on September 5, 2008


Ever since Hurricane Katrina proved to be an embarassment for the Bush administration - and every new hurricane becames an opportunity to remind everyone of this - Metafilter lets you see where the big Atlantic storms are, where they've been, and where they're projected to be.
posted by three blind mice at 12:24 AM on September 5, 2008


Wow, the projection for Hannah has it coming our way. Thanks for the reminder that hurricanes do hit New England.
posted by longsleeves at 12:30 AM on September 5, 2008


wow i will use storm tracker for sure. cool historical data.
posted by eustatic at 1:33 AM on September 5, 2008


Nice find Dave...thanks.
posted by salishsea at 1:38 AM on September 5, 2008


So TBM, just to clarify -- is it that hurricane tracking tools are being developed specifically to embarrass the Bush Administration? Or is it this post in particular? Because, you know, meteorology has a well-known liberal bias.
posted by stupidsexyFlanders at 1:51 AM on September 5, 2008


Well, SSF, that storm tracker is, afer all, on the website of the ultra-liberal and America-hating MSNBC network. Oh, but wait -- FOXNews.com has one too.
posted by longsleeves at 3:13 AM on September 5, 2008


George Bush doesn't like hurricane trackers.
posted by WolfDaddy at 4:33 AM on September 5, 2008


is it that hurricane tracking tools are being developed specifically to embarrass the Bush Administration?

No, but the approach of every hurricane seems to be preceeded by a post about it on Metafilter. Gustav generated far more wind here in the blue than in New Orleans.
posted by three blind mice at 4:38 AM on September 5, 2008


Stormpulse is also really good.
posted by bluefly at 4:47 AM on September 5, 2008 [2 favorites]


And you can cut out the middleman by going straight to NOAA's hurricane site.
posted by lodurr at 5:15 AM on September 5, 2008


Here's hoping it's not a 1-2 punch for us in NC.

BTW - anyone heard from ColdChef et al since Gustav?
posted by yoga at 5:43 AM on September 5, 2008


Somebody posted HAMweather in the Gustav thread; I thought it was pretty neat.
posted by Perplexity at 5:55 AM on September 5, 2008


I prefer this one. And yeah, the NHC is a fine source of ALL-CAPS text discussion of wind shear, eyewalls, Dvorak T-numbers, and so on.

Hurricane Katrina proved to be an embarassment for the Bush administration - and every new hurricane becames an opportunity to remind everyone of this ...

Well, thank you for reminding us of that. However, the reason you're seeing so much discussion of tropical storms lately is that this is about as active as hurricane season ever gets. The news coverage of Gustav was full of ridiculous hype before it struck, sure, but now most people seem to be understating and ignoring the rather substantial damage it actually did. The social and economic effects it had will probably still not be fully appreciated by the time Hurricane Ike arrives, wherever it ends up going. If it ends up in the Gulf, I'm sure you can look forward to another week of assuming that everyone talking about the weather is really talking about George Bush.
posted by sfenders at 6:03 AM on September 5, 2008


BLECH! MSNBC ... but that's just personal. Glad to see the effort, though. The gutting of NOAA was a terrible thing; too many people put their faith in The Weather Channel (tip of hat to lodurr for point out their excellent site ... I usually check in there first.

Man, Hanna is one screwed up storm; I can't recall ever seeing a storm that was so meandering as this one.
posted by aldus_manutius at 6:14 AM on September 5, 2008


Hurricane Katrina proved to be an embarassment for the Bush administration - and every new hurricane becames an opportunity to remind everyone of this ...

Actually, Hurricane Katrina killed a lot of people. That kinds of makes all subsequent hurricanes into something people want to hear or talk about. Politics is just the icing on the disaster. It ain't the cake.
posted by srboisvert at 6:18 AM on September 5, 2008


Excellent visual! Thanks. And great thread links too.
posted by nickyskye at 6:24 AM on September 5, 2008


Obviously, those terrorists on the West Coast of Africa are stirring up all these hurricanes 'cause they HATE OUR FREEDOMS.
posted by fiercecupcake at 6:51 AM on September 5, 2008


three blind mice writes "but the approach of every hurricane seems to be preceeded by a post about it on Metafilter. Gustav generated far more wind here in the blue than in New Orleans."

So? Are you somehow under the impression that if it doesn't hit New Orleans then it doesn't matter? Louisiana got hit hard, or at least Metafilter's own ColdChef did.
posted by Mitheral at 7:44 AM on September 5, 2008


That is a nicely done piece of infographic. Note how the storm icon gets bigger when the storm is stronger, and smaller when it weakens. There's a ton of information being presented here in an extremely compact and clear way. It's always interesting to see this sort of thing done well.
posted by rusty at 7:49 AM on September 5, 2008


ColdChef reports on the storm.

Gustav thread with news of other area MeFites.

No, but the approach of every hurricane seems to be preceeded by a post about it on Metafilter. Gustav generated far more wind here in the blue than in New Orleans

Hurricane Gustav could inflict as much as $10 billion in damage, making it one of the costliest storms in U.S. history.
Just because it wasn't a humanitarian disaster on the order of Katrina doesn't mean that it wasn't a powerful, damaging storm.
posted by desuetude at 7:54 AM on September 5, 2008 [1 favorite]


Nice find Dave...thanks.
posted by salishsea


Nice find? NICE FIND? It's MSNBC! What's next, CNN? Oh my, our 'nice find' standards have reached AOL newbie standards. The horrors!
posted by gtr at 8:01 AM on September 5, 2008


Which one of you goofs ordered me a tropical storm delivery for tomorrow morning? Sheesh.

(Thanks for not paying extra and upgrading to a hurricane!)
posted by konolia at 10:29 AM on September 5, 2008


The Naval Research Laboratory has super nerdy-looking projections on their site also.
posted by those are my balloons at 10:33 AM on September 5, 2008


Weather porn thread! Woot!
posted by steef at 11:56 AM on September 5, 2008


Nice find Dave...thanks.
posted by salishsea

Nice find? NICE FIND? It's MSNBC! What's next, CNN? Oh my, our 'nice find' standards have reached AOL newbie standards. The horrors!
posted by gtr at 8:01 AM on September 5 [+] [!]


I hadn't seen it, I would not have come across it on my own, it's a cool tool for tracking hurricanes, therefore nice find. Kind of what I come to Metafilter for.

So I stand by my appreciation for Dave's posting.
posted by salishsea at 12:15 PM on September 5, 2008


Unisys has animated storm photos etc.
posted by vsync at 1:42 PM on September 5, 2008


There was an interesting story on NPR this afternoon about the relationship between African dust and hurricane strength. Short version: Dust clouds off the coast of Africa may serve to dampen tropical storms forming in the eastern Atlantic. This year there is very little dust. It ends with the scientist noting that we're just halfway through hurricane season this year.
posted by mediareport at 4:44 PM on September 5, 2008


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