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Tipping Point Ahead
September 12, 2008 11:58 AM   Subscribe

Wake Up, Freak Out - then Get a Grip, an 11-minute animated film about climate change by activist Leo Murray, complete with script with references
posted by criticalbill (9 comments total) 8 users marked this as a favorite

 
Is this something I'd need to have a brain to understand?
posted by rooftop secrets at 12:14 PM on September 12, 2008


The frustrating thing about this stuff is that the people most likely to watch it are the people that least need to watch it.
posted by Shepherd at 1:06 PM on September 12, 2008


I liked it, but as Shepherd said, I already knew it, and would have trouble getting certain people to watch it because it assumes a level of acceptance.

This is more for the person who is aware of global warming, but not aware of the "tipping point" narrative, which is the current edge of research, which the next IPCC report (in 3-5 years time) should make more mainstream once the research and data comes in.
posted by stbalbach at 1:53 PM on September 12, 2008


Funny, it feels cold here
posted by A189Nut at 2:33 PM on September 12, 2008


The frustrating thing about this stuff is that the people most likely to watch it are the people that least need to watch it.

Translation: The frustrating thing about people whose minds need to be changed is that their minds aren't already changed. True. Also a tautology. And a cop-out - one I use myself quite often. I'm trying to use it less.

Sometimes, the "people least likely to [watch it/read it/talk about it/understand it/take action]" are the least likely to fit your preconceived notions, and may be "those people" because everyone treats them like they think "those people" are supposed to be treated. So send it along to them. Even if 1 out of 100 watches it and thinks about it, that is a net gain.

And anyway, there's something to be said for artful (re)representations of the problem that remind us why, amidst our otherwise cynical acceptance of the troubling premises, we first gave a shit, woke up, got a grip, and didn't let "Ah, people won't watch it" thoughts stop us from taking action. There's nothing inherently wrong with propagandizing eachother if it helps us find more nuance in or motivation for what we do, or gives us a new excerpt or bit of information or approach to use when talking to strangers, speaking in classrooms, writing letters, making blog posts, etc. Preaching to the choir is the only reason there are preachers in the first place.
posted by regicide is good for you at 3:22 PM on September 12, 2008 [1 favorite]


regicide is good for you: Translation: The frustrating thing about people whose minds need to be changed is that their minds aren't already changed.

I'm pretty sure the translation of what he said is actually 'The frustrating thing about people whose minds need to be changed is that they refuse to examine the evidence my side presents.' This is not a tautology, it is a real problem in field of climate change, and your proposed solution (which pretty much boils down to 'just grind it into their face harder') is not one that is likely to help.
posted by Mitrovarr at 8:53 PM on September 12, 2008 [1 favorite]


I dunno, I think the people who most need to watch this video are people who are already convinced that climate change is happening, but have sorta given up on doing anything about it because it seems inevitable. Like me, I suppose.

As regicide said, sometimes preaching to the choir is okay, because it helps get the choir more motivated to do what it is they need to do.
posted by dylan20 at 7:56 AM on September 13, 2008



I'm pretty sure the translation of what he said is actually 'The frustrating thing about people whose minds need to be changed is that they refuse to examine the evidence my side presents.' This is not a tautology, it is a real problem in field of climate change, and your proposed solution (which pretty much boils down to 'just grind it into their face harder') is not one that is likely to help.


I'd like to second this - as I recently was in a discussion with an otherwise educated person who denies not just that humans are even capable of affecting the climate, but that global warming exists at all. He has no solid reasons for this, and my attempts at logical discussion failed for some reason.

I'd love to see some advice on how to have a discussion with this type of person, but I don't have those resources. I even tried the 4-box threat matrix angle that doesn't even really require you to accept global warming as a fact, just the mere leap that you could possibly be wrong. Still, fail. If I sent him this video he would watch it, but constantly be telling himself that it's based on a false premise. How do you work with that? (not rhetorical)
posted by odinsdream at 9:14 AM on September 13, 2008


and your proposed solution (which pretty much boils down to 'just grind it into their face harder') is not one that is likely to help.

Alright, so, what is the solution? The Ludovico technique?

I'm not being flippant, it's an honest question. I don't know what has ever changed societies other than changed minds, and I don't know what changes minds other than those minds being exposed to new ideas on a regular basis. And I didn't say anything about face grinding - that was unfair. (Almost) Everyone is capable of tact.

I think one of the greatest obstacles progressive activists face is the (pick one:) unwillingness/inability/external social obstacles to establishing genuine relationships with people who think radically differently. I'm not terribly good at it myself, I'll admit. But I have known people whose minds have changed about major issues and who've cited me as a significant influence, and there are of course people who've been that influence on me.
posted by regicide is good for you at 9:17 AM on September 13, 2008


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