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Clones produced from mice frozen for 16 years
November 4, 2008 1:42 PM   Subscribe


 
Its about time. I could use a new dishwasher / kitchen faucet.
posted by isopraxis at 1:58 PM on November 4, 2008


It took me several minutes to get that comment.
posted by GuyZero at 2:24 PM on November 4, 2008


Mammoths next?

No. Eric Cartman and Ted Williams are up next.
posted by ericb at 2:26 PM on November 4, 2008


Nixon/Gore 2112!
posted by rokusan at 2:30 PM on November 4, 2008 [1 favorite]


Bring on the Disney clones!
posted by Astro Zombie at 2:33 PM on November 4, 2008


Yes, I would like a mammoth. Oh please yes.
posted by middleclasstool at 2:33 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm just looking forward to the expansion of the Jurassic Park franchise into the ice-age for Jurassic Park IV or V (depending on if the 4th is really made). That, and who wouldn't love a baby elephant/mammoth vacuum cleaner?
posted by filthy light thief at 2:35 PM on November 4, 2008


... but back in the realm of more solid (pseudo)science - wouldn't you need a good supply of frozen specimens to have a viable stock? One concern with endangered species on the brink is that a limited gene pool could be wiped out by one nasty sickness, where a larger population could recover, or some population would be immune.

At least we'd get Whoopi Goldberg back as a detective, along with a loud but lovable dinosaur side-kick. (This is a really awful movie - only watch it if you have absolutely nothing better to do, and you do not have to pay to rent it. You have been warned.)
posted by filthy light thief at 2:41 PM on November 4, 2008


Mammoths next?

Not yet. The elephant in the room here is the need for cells and surrogate mothers to put the nuclear material into. I'm sure they'll try modern day elephants, but I'd be amazed if it worked.

It does mean we will be able to clone the duke, though.
posted by kisch mokusch at 2:47 PM on November 4, 2008


That is not dead which can eternal lie
And through strange aeons, even death may die.
posted by FatherDagon at 2:51 PM on November 4, 2008


Miniature pot-bellied mammoths. Could you even imagine?

What the hell did mammoths eat anyway? Couldn't it be quite possible that what they eat doesn't exist anymore?
posted by Ynoxas at 3:03 PM on November 4, 2008


What the hell did mammoths eat anyway? Couldn't it be quite possible that what they eat doesn't exist anymore?

At last count, there where about 6.7 billion hot meals running around.
posted by The Whelk at 3:11 PM on November 4, 2008


I'm pretty certain mammoths were herbivores, Whelk.

The elephant in the room here is the need for cells and surrogate mothers to put the nuclear material into. I'm sure they'll try modern day elephants, but I'd be amazed if it worked.

It could work. The question is, would they risk the life of an elephant in order to find out?
posted by showbiz_liz at 3:29 PM on November 4, 2008


It could work. The question is, would they risk the life of an elephant in order to find out?

Would it cost an elephants life? I'm no expert, but I would've thought they'd go for in vitro fertilisation, nuclear transfer and implantation. The embryo would likely fail (my prediction), but I don't think the surrogate mother would die. Unless we're talking about something really nasty at the end of term.
posted by kisch mokusch at 3:49 PM on November 4, 2008


I can't recall where, but I read somewhere that there aren't any major obstacles in implanting a human fetus in a cow. Obviously it hasn't been tried experimentally, but the article said that the fetus/placenta combination is able to hook into just about any mammal and that the only real thing you need to watch out for is that the host has a similar gestation period to the fetus' species and a gross size match.

Anyone here know if that's total BS or accurate?
posted by sotonohito at 5:09 PM on November 4, 2008


Yes, I would like a mammoth. Oh please yes.

I want a cookie-cutter cat.
posted by homunculus at 5:36 PM on November 4, 2008


Forgot Mammoth! How about a nice Velociraptor?
posted by Joey Michaels at 6:15 PM on November 4, 2008



I'm pretty certain mammoths were herbivores, Whelk


But where is the fun in that?
posted by The Whelk at 6:39 PM on November 4, 2008


They won't eat my houseplants, will they?
posted by Balisong at 6:52 PM on November 4, 2008


Metafilter 2029. Live streaming box of baby mammoths?
Well, I'd watch.
posted by tawny at 7:58 AM on November 5, 2008


In other Riken research news: Japanese researchers make brain tissues from stem cells
posted by homunculus at 1:55 PM on November 6, 2008




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