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TV Offal's songs and the US radio jingles which inspired them
November 15, 2008 2:49 AM   Subscribe

TV Offal's songs and the US radio jingles which inspired them. "It's nice in Detroit." "It's nice being Esther." TV critic Victor Lewis-Smith's late night comedy show was short lived but well remembered by those of us who saw it on Channel 4in the UK (cf, Google Video and YouTube).
posted by feelinglistless (6 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite

 
Cool post. After a perusal of YouTube clips, I really want to see this show. Especially since Oasis sounds the same way to him as they do to me.
posted by DecemberBoy at 6:26 AM on November 15, 2008


This pleases me greatly.
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 at 7:04 AM on November 15, 2008


Great stuff... I was recently reminded on how great he was listening again to some of his sublime prank calls during the Brand-gate stuff
posted by fearfulsymmetry at 7:59 AM on November 15, 2008


Voice starts out low then gets high.

VLS may be an irritating bunt, but sometimes that is just what we need more of on TV. Fonejacker is good, but doesn't have the WTF factor in quite as large dollops.
posted by asok at 8:22 AM on November 15, 2008


Oh, and maximum respect to the signalnoise person, nice work!
posted by asok at 8:22 AM on November 15, 2008


Ah, VLS! The jingles are brilliant and i sometimes still find myself singing bits and bobs from them a decade on.

Be sure to also check out the episode with the Honest Obituary of Andrew Lloyd Webber! I think what makes TV Offal rise above juvenalia is that there was a lot of subtle intelligence going on during the creation of the show. The Webber obit points out that he is simply a third-rate tone-deaf tunesmith who was the victim of time traveling composers who nicked his melodies for their own work. Ha!

The TV Offal production staff were quite accomplished in music, and it was nothing short of genius the they way they crafted the presentation comparing Webber's work side by side with the work he lifted from other composers and then using that to create the 'time traveling theft' narrative.

Whip pan, away!!!
posted by kuppajava at 12:55 PM on November 16, 2008


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