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Be a ruthless banker in your pyjamas.
December 19, 2008 3:28 AM   Subscribe

Snowed in this weekend? Done with your Christmas shopping? Perhaps you're in no mood to shop anymore. Gather your friends together for a low-tech round of The Economist's Credit Crunch Board Game.
posted by thread_makimaki (8 comments total) 2 users marked this as a favorite

 
Is it wrong that I'm more excited about the game currency they've made? It means new money for my Cheapass Games.
posted by cobaltnine at 6:12 AM on December 19, 2008


Hats off to you and yours! I love a game that reflects our current financial woes.

Merry merry,

Mr. Monopoly
Still #6 if any of you are still counting
posted by twoleftfeet at 6:46 AM on December 19, 2008


Mildly amusing, but why do people think rolling a dice (or coins) and moving that many spaces is an acceptable mechanic these days? No wonder boardgames are unpopular.
posted by salmacis at 7:13 AM on December 19, 2008


The best part is that you get to literally print your own money.
posted by euphorb at 8:14 AM on December 19, 2008


Damn. It's too bad I have 'moonMan's Xmas present already. He's a total board game nut. Oh yeah, and he works for a hedge fund, which these days is a lot like rolling the dice "I'm still employed today, 1... I'm still employed today, 2..."
posted by grapefruitmoon at 8:35 AM on December 19, 2008


So, is it any fun?
posted by a robot made out of meat at 9:56 AM on December 19, 2008


Who Invented Monopoly?:
Charles Darrow, a US citizen, invented Monopoly in 1931, during the Great Depression. Out of work, Darrow earned a living inventing puzzles and games, to sell to toy-makers.
Monopoly's Staying Power:
During the depths of the Great Depression, suggests Orbanes, playing Monopoly was a way of escaping economic privation while aspiring to the power of a Morgan.
posted by l33tpolicywonk at 2:20 PM on December 19, 2008


Actually the Charles Darrow thing isn't true. There were a number of games that predate "Monopoly" that were essentially the same game, like "The Landlord's Game," dating to 1904.
posted by MythMaker at 4:54 PM on December 19, 2008


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