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1969
March 22, 2009 8:52 AM   Subscribe

"Proud Mary". "Born on the Bayou". "Green River". "Bad Moon Rising". "Lodi". "Fortunate Son". (previously)

If Creedence Clearwater Revival wasn't the greatest American band, they probably had the greatest year of any American band.
posted by Joe Beese (77 comments total) 12 users marked this as a favorite

 
Duuuude, c'mon. No link to "Effigy"?

Bonus Unlce Tupelo cover!
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 9:00 AM on March 22, 2009 [4 favorites]


The Dude: Do you find them much, these, stolen cars?
Younger Cop: Sometimes. Wouldn't hold out much hope for the tape deck though.
Older Cop: Or the Creedence.
posted by metaxa at 9:09 AM on March 22, 2009 [5 favorites]


Midnight Special
posted by 445supermag at 9:14 AM on March 22, 2009


Forget the Stu Cook and Doug Clifford atrocity*, this is the kind of Creedence Clearwater revisitation that I can get behind. One of the best ever bands California ever produced.

And was there anything of value in the car?
Huh? Oh. Yeah. Tape deck. Couple of Creedence tapes. And there was a, uh. . . my briefcase.

posted by porn in the woods at 9:17 AM on March 22, 2009


CCR's version of "I Heard It Through The Grapevine" is a great tune to take a shit to.

Seriously. I was way too high in college with a friend and we decided it was the greatest song ever to shit to. A nice long one, with a good book. Eight minutes. Perfection.
posted by bardic at 9:18 AM on March 22, 2009 [2 favorites]


I bought the "Sweet Hitch-Hiker" 45 when I was 9 years old and played it endlessly on my sister's cool little portable record player. It had an edgey quality that I'd never really heard before, and I was hooked. The song was punk - in 1971.
posted by davebush at 9:21 AM on March 22, 2009


CCR's version of "I Heard It Through The Grapevine" is a great tune to take a shit to.

I always preferred Peter Framton's "Do You Feel Like We Do?". The long 18 min. version.
posted by Balisong at 9:28 AM on March 22, 2009


Tombstone Shadow is my favorite track from Green River, mostly because of the second guitar solo that is almost only one note. (He adds a few more in the linked yt clip. Refer to the album version to hear em get all Terry Riley there for a few bars.)
posted by $0up at 9:32 AM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


&fmt=18
posted by geekyguy at 9:32 AM on March 22, 2009


I always preferred Peter Framton's "Do You Feel Like We Do?". The long 18 min. version.
You need more fiber in your playlist.
posted by horsemuth at 9:35 AM on March 22, 2009 [4 favorites]


Didn't like 'em much when they were new. Don't like 'em much now.
Clearly not the best US band ever -- just recycled bad blues and pop nonsense for the most part. Many bands I'm not really a fan of are much better, and matter more. The Dead, REM just for starters. If we can call Bruce and the E Street Band a band, then this discussion about CCR is pretty much toast.
posted by cccorlew at 9:53 AM on March 22, 2009


"Suzie Q" always did it for me; there was something almost erotic about it.
posted by Seekerofsplendor at 9:54 AM on March 22, 2009


Seriously, yeah: Fibre. (If there's any musical composition perfect for pooping, this is it.)
posted by Sys Rq at 9:55 AM on March 22, 2009 [3 favorites]


I recently watched "John Fogerty: The Long Road Home" and it looked Fogerty was on drugs. But in reality, I think he was jacked up on CCR.
posted by rageagainsttherobots at 10:19 AM on March 22, 2009


cccorlew: " Many bands I'm not really a fan of are much better, and matter more. The Dead... for starters."

I believe it was Dave Marsh who observed the irony of CCR stretching out on "I Heard It Through The Grapevine" to prove they were the equal of their Bay Area rivals when they were already far, far better.

As a big fan of R.E.M. - and a smaller, but still considerable fan of Springsteen - I can respectfully listen to arguments in their favor. But The Grateful Dead? Really?
posted by Joe Beese at 10:24 AM on March 22, 2009 [4 favorites]


Never been much of a CCR fan myself - can't get past John Fogerty's voice. Although Fortunate Son is a great tune.

Definitely not my pick for Greatest US Band ever. Way seconding the Bruce comment upthread for that honor. Bruce Springsteen has far more range in his songwriting ability and sound than CCR ever did. Also, the Beach Boys had more going on musically although they played a completely different type of music.
posted by Lipstick Thespian at 10:24 AM on March 22, 2009



CCR's version of "I Heard It Through The Grapevine" is a great tune to take a shit to.

Seriously. I was way too high in college with a friend and we decided it was the greatest song ever to shit to. A nice long one, with a good book. Eight minutes. Perfection.


The Beta Band has a slow, repetitive song called "Push It Out." It builds in intensity over 5 minutes with the looping lyric "Push it out...push it alllll out, push it out, push it allll out."
posted by Slarty Bartfast at 10:30 AM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


Many bands I'm not really a fan of are much better, and matter more. The Dead... for starters.

Doing longer songs with more notes in them does not equal doing better songs, neccessarily. That's like judging a meal based on the number of ingredients.
posted by jonmc at 10:32 AM on March 22, 2009 [3 favorites]


Interesting bits from various interviews and mailing lists. Kind of a thin post about a well-known band here, just YouTube clips of their big hits and a Wikipedia link.
posted by mediareport at 10:33 AM on March 22, 2009


Bruce Springsteen has far more range in his songwriting ability and sound than CCR ever did.

I'm a huge Springsteen fan, and Springsteen considers CCR a huge influence.
posted by jonmc at 10:34 AM on March 22, 2009


I love me some CCR. I don't know about the greatest American band, but I'm sure Suzy Q is the best damn song with two guitar solos.
posted by Robin Kestrel at 10:44 AM on March 22, 2009


there's a subtle simplicity in fogerty's political songs that makes them timeless. effigy, fortunate son, someday never comes, ramble table... they never stop being relevant.
posted by klanawa at 10:49 AM on March 22, 2009


"There's a bathroom on the right."
posted by Mike D at 10:49 AM on March 22, 2009


... and pagan baby never stops being awesome... the first 4 minutes, anyway.
posted by klanawa at 10:51 AM on March 22, 2009


Midnight Special

Can't hold a candle to Lonnie Donegan
posted by PeterMcDermott at 10:56 AM on March 22, 2009


Hell yes. CCR is probably my favorite rock band, a statement that gets weird looks from a lot of my friends. Especially since my second favorite is Ministry.
posted by brundlefly at 11:25 AM on March 22, 2009 [3 favorites]


mediareport: " Kind of a thin post about a well-known band here, just YouTube clips of their big hits and a Wikipedia link."

Thanks, MetaTalk!

As for music to defecate to...
posted by Joe Beese at 11:28 AM on March 22, 2009


"At least they left the tape deck."
"And the Creedence."

Dude, CCR is by far and large the greatest. And I hate the fucking Eagles.
posted by jsavimbi at 11:30 AM on March 22, 2009


That's 2 . Enough already.
posted by jonmc at 11:33 AM on March 22, 2009


I watched "Cool Hand Luke" the other day and it hit me, listening to the soundtrack: Fogerty must have loved the shit out of that movie. Creedence recorded nearly every song.
posted by middleclasstool at 11:38 AM on March 22, 2009


As successful years go, I think CCR's 1969 loses out to the New Kids on the Block's 1990.
posted by box at 11:40 AM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


I hate that criticism -- even when it's as empty as, "don't like 'em, and so-and-so is better" -- is presented as evidence of a finer discernment.

Don't like CCR? You can walk.
posted by palliser at 12:06 PM on March 22, 2009 [3 favorites]


Doing longer songs with more notes in them does not equal doing better songs, neccessarily.

Yes.

Actually, I kind of like Yes, but my god they could go on.
posted by Kronos_to_Earth at 12:07 PM on March 22, 2009


Noooooooooooooo. You will *NOT* make FPPs about my arch nemesis!!!!!!!
FOOOOOGGGGGGEEEEERRRRRRRRRRTTTTYYYYYYYYYY!!!!!!!!!!!
posted by miss lynnster at 12:08 PM on March 22, 2009 [5 favorites]


Dammit. I was having such a nice day until now... grumble grumble mumble.
posted by miss lynnster at 12:09 PM on March 22, 2009


Sorry-- if you're looking for the greatest US Rock Band, look no further than Husker Du. Any band my father played in his K car while I was growing up-- by definition-- cannot be the greatest American Rock Band.
posted by mark242 at 12:28 PM on March 22, 2009


mark242 - My dad played Benny Goodman in the car while I was growing up. Your family car was cool, trust me.
posted by davebush at 12:35 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


mark242: "Any band my father played in his K car while I was growing up-- by definition-- cannot be the greatest American Rock Band."

This reminds me of that original copy of Cosmo's Factory amid Dad's Mitch Miller and Nana Mouskouri LPs. I never did get around to asking him how he glommed onto that. Too late now, sadly.

What I remember about that platter was how thick and heavy it was. It must have had twice as much vinyl in it as the stuff I was buying in the early 80s.
posted by Joe Beese at 12:42 PM on March 22, 2009


I see "greatest American band" along the lines of "great American novel." I don't think we've seen it yet, but people keep arguing they have.

The great bands have moments, but they either seem to burn out, blow up, or ossify too quickly. REM peaked twice, but there was significant wandering in there, and now they're sounding like a lounge act. The Replacements pissed away their chance by being pissed. Springsteen was great, but then in the mid 80s he just stopped being great.

As for CCR, they were pretty fly for white guys, but they've always seemed like they're missing something, and I'm not sure what.

If pressed for "greatest American band" I'd say the Swampers.
posted by dw at 12:43 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


and now they're sounding like a lounge act

You haven't heard "Accelerate", have you?
posted by davebush at 12:51 PM on March 22, 2009


True story. My one decade as a musician began and ended with CCR:
1973: 16 years old and in my friends basement. Friend hands me a bass so he can play guitar to "Keep on Chooglin'" Bass part consists of thumping the E string to 4/4 time DUN DUN DUN DUN. After an hour I am sweaty and enthralled.
...
(X number of bands times Y number of clubs between Z non-contiguous semesters of college)
...
1983: Touring ski resorts and roadhouses in the rockies with a throw-together band of studio musicians bored with LA. These guys are pickers and way out of my league. But man, I've got the Stu Cook charisma down. DUN DUN DUN DUN DUN Band has a goal. We snake around the Continental Divide getting tight, then head to Oregon and flush out Fogerty (rumoured to be living there at the time) so we can be his backup band.

We land in Portland but can't find him in any phone book. Other guys go back to LA. I hang up my bass and get married.

(bows)
posted by hal9k at 12:54 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


As successful years go, I think CCR's 1969 loses out to the New Kids on the Block's 1990

I don't think you understand. The New Kids on the Block suck.
posted by IvoShandor at 1:56 PM on March 22, 2009


They did in 1990, too.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 2:00 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


Crazy Otto.
posted by slimepuppy at 2:01 PM on March 22, 2009


About 15 years ago a friend lent me two of his Dad's CCR vinyl LPs. Still have 'em.
posted by Elmore at 2:07 PM on March 22, 2009


Noooooooooooooo. You will *NOT* make FPPs about my arch nemesis!!!!!!!
FOOOOOGGGGGGEEEEERRRRRRRRRRTTTTYYYYYYYYYY!!!!!!!!!!!


Awww, I forgot about that. Tell the story again!
posted by evilcolonel at 2:08 PM on March 22, 2009


Sorry-- if you're looking for the greatest US Rock Band, look no further than Husker Du.

I'm with you on this. Listening to "Celebrated Summer" as I type, in fact. Coincidence?

Any band my father played in his K car while I was growing up-- by definition-- cannot be the greatest American Rock Band.

Heh. My "real" introduction to CCR (save for likely having heard one or more of the hits on classic rock radio) came courtesy of stumbling upon my Dad's well-worn copy of the Cosmo's Factory LP, so:

De gustibus abbatibus non est disputandum.
posted by joe lisboa at 2:24 PM on March 22, 2009


The New Kids on the Block aren't to my taste, but here are a few things they did in 1990:

Released their ninth-straight Top Ten single
Put out an album that debuted at #1 and eventually went triple-platinum
Won a couple American and Billboard Music Awards
Topped Forbes' highest-paid entertainers list
Sold $400 million in merchandise
Starred in a Saturday morning cartoon

By the standards of their industry, that's a Thriller goddamn year. And when you consider the, uh, range of the New Kids' talents, well, I'd say that NKOTB, in 1990, just might have had the greatest year of any American band.
posted by box at 2:43 PM on March 22, 2009 [4 favorites]


I'm a huge Springsteen fan, and Springsteen considers CCR a huge influence.

Absolutely, and frankly this is a no-brainer. To call Springsteen influential/seminal etc. and to say the CCR were not just doesn't make any fucking sense.
posted by ob at 2:58 PM on March 22, 2009


My lifelong love of CCR and Fogerty took a massive blow the two times I had to deal with him while working as a bellhop. Easly the biggest jerk celebrity I ever had the fortune to assist. Tori Amos on the other hand was about the friendliest.
posted by tarvuz at 3:16 PM on March 22, 2009


To call Springsteen influential/seminal etc. and to say the CCR were not just doesn't make any fucking sense.

Exactly. By playing compact rockabilly/R&B based songs in the psychedelic circus/art-attack 1968-1970 period, CCR (along with The Band) launched the roots-rock movement of which Springsteen is pretty much the mainstay.
posted by jonmc at 3:28 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


Tori Amos on the other hand was about the friendliest.

That's funny. I was just reading some SXSW scuttlebutt somewhere in the electronic ether a moment ago and some dude noted that Amos's "people" were adamant about the request that no "help" make direct eye contact with her. I guess that just goes to show, er, something.
posted by joe lisboa at 3:40 PM on March 22, 2009


CCR (along with The Band) launched the roots-rock movement of which Springsteen is pretty much the mainstay.

You're overlooking somebody . . . hmm . . . Bob somethingorother?
posted by Sys Rq at 3:45 PM on March 22, 2009


Sys Rq: Dylan was a definite predecessor, but he was and is cooking on a planet uniquely his own, which kind of makes him a movement unto himself.
posted by jonmc at 3:48 PM on March 22, 2009


Thanks, MetaTalk!

Dude, I fleshed out your thin post.

Usually I charge for that.
posted by mediareport at 4:01 PM on March 22, 2009


I thought it was thinning out the flesh post that you usually charged for.
posted by box at 4:33 PM on March 22, 2009


I was just reading some SXSW scuttlebutt somewhere in the electronic ether a moment ago and some dude noted that Amos's "people" were adamant about the request that no "help" make direct eye contact with her.

Sometimes celebrities' "people" are a bunch of self-important pricks due to their proximity to the celebrity, while the celebrities themselves are very nice people. That was the experience with some authors we had visit a library where I worked.

Oh yeah, CCR is great. Thanks for the post.
posted by marxchivist at 4:49 PM on March 22, 2009


...just recycled bad blues and pop nonsense for the most part...

They were some damn fine recyclers, though, who captured and fully internalized the rawness and soul of the blues they loved. I go back to CCR with some frequency, and one thing that I find almost astonishing is the absolutely stripped down, no-frills, garage band rawness of their sound as a band. Considering that, it's actually pretty amazing that they were the AM radio chart toppers that they were. Most everything else getting heavy radio play at that time was generally a lot more polished. CCR's classic tracks sound exactly like what they were: a blues/rock band playing a song. No more, no less.
posted by flapjax at midnite at 5:20 PM on March 22, 2009 [2 favorites]


Creedence. That's a chooglin'.
posted by neustile at 5:29 PM on March 22, 2009 [2 favorites]


mos's "people" were adamant about the request that no "help" make direct eye contact with her.

People are more often arseholes than the person themselves. You'll find a number of interviews with Ben Kingsley where his handlers insist he will go apeshit if not addressed as Sir, only to have the interviewer discover this is not, in fact, the case.
posted by rodgerd at 5:49 PM on March 22, 2009


"Heard it through the grapevine" is 11 minutes long, not 8. You have an extra three minutes to enjoy your dump.
posted by splitpeasoup at 6:00 PM on March 22, 2009


Isn't the version on 'Greatest Hits' something like sixteen? It's a good choice when there's a cd jukebox at the bar.
posted by box at 6:04 PM on March 22, 2009


I love me some Credence. I love many of the bands mentioned in this thread.
However I must respectfully submit the Stooges.
1 2 3
posted by brevator at 6:06 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


God I love singing at full blast to CCR Chronicle Volume 1.
posted by rubah at 6:29 PM on March 22, 2009


Rodgerd, Marxchivist: I don't doubt that for a second. In fact, as a musician and an "entertainment lawyer" myself, I'm far more inclined to believe your first-hand accounts over that of some random anonymous internet dude(s). I was just marveling at the e-synchronicity of it all, is all. That said, if you'd read my rider you'd know that I am to be addressed at all times (internet inclusive) as "The One, No, Not That One." Also: lose the brown M&Ms or the show's off, like, for reals. NO REFUNDS.
posted by joe lisboa at 6:43 PM on March 22, 2009


Seems like lots of celebs are demanding the no eye contact thing...I can understand perhaps not wanting to be spoken to, but not even be looked at?

...as to the post, shouldn't you have to do more than just have some good period hits to be the greatest American band? Shouldn't persistence, longevity, innovation or authenticity count for anything?

Coolest thing about Fogerty was getting sued for plagiarizing himself...that is pretty unique in rock history for sure!
posted by bonefish at 7:26 PM on March 22, 2009


The complaints about Fogerty being an asshole celebrity are distressing for multiple reasons, not the least of which is that "Fortunate Son" is one of the single greatest musical indictments of the relationship between capitalism, war, and the American class system... in just over two minutes, to boot!
posted by scody at 8:54 PM on March 22, 2009 [2 favorites]


You want to see something really scary?
posted by Smedleyman at 9:28 PM on March 22, 2009


Can you really consider NKOTB to be a band?
posted by captainsohler at 9:35 PM on March 22, 2009


Noooooooooooooo. You will *NOT* make FPPs about my arch nemesis!!!!!!!
FOOOOOGGGGGGEEEEERRRRRRRRRRTTTTYYYYYYYYYY!!!!!!!!!!!

Awww, I forgot about that. Tell the story again!



Nah, I'll just link to it and then try to get the image of red fringe out of my brain by finishing my glass of wine.
posted by miss lynnster at 10:53 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


A few commenters here are missing the point. CCR was among the first white-boy bands to successfully sound completely deep backwoods, down-home bluesy and be able to maintain it across more than a couple of numbers. Their songs are instantly recognizable and have a simple timeless quality that is damn hard to imitate.

And I'm going to pretend I didn't read the comments here touting NKOTB.
posted by telstar at 10:54 PM on March 22, 2009


P.S. -- Don Henley John Fogerty can suck it!!!!
posted by miss lynnster at 10:58 PM on March 22, 2009 [1 favorite]


I always knew Fogerty was a self-important dick, but that's awesome.
posted by middleclasstool at 6:36 AM on March 23, 2009


Springsteen considers CCR a huge influence.

You know how the first love of your life imprints on your sexual tastes all your life-- that hair, the eyes, a certain type of smile will forever get you hot for strangers? --that's CCR for me. My first album. My first love in music. The roawr. The driving beat. The growly voice. All these things-- I need this in my music, it speaks to me in a primal way. I hear Who'll Stop the Rain and I get this throat-choking longing for the 70's.


And what the fuck is NKOTB doing polluting this page? What a shitty, shitty reminder that music can be a soul-sucking useless waste of time.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 6:42 AM on March 23, 2009


miss lynnster your story is great! It's always a shame when people that you admire as musicians/artists/writers etc. turn out to be aresholes, but I guess that's just the way it goes...
posted by ob at 10:02 AM on March 23, 2009


> CCR's version of "I Heard It Through The Grapevine" is a great tune to take a shit to.

When I was in high school my dad told me that the first time he heard that song he was in a bar with my mom, back when it was originally released; along with several other couples they got up to dance, not knowing, of course, that the LP version was eleven minutes long. Apparently it turned into a bit of a dance marathon, with very few people sticking it out all the way through. After he told me that, whenever I listened to it on my walkman I imagined a video wherein the California Raisins danced to it and, one by one, dropped dead from exhaustion.
posted by The Card Cheat at 4:59 PM on March 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


I'd say that NKOTB, in 1990, just might have had the greatest year of any American band.

Booo! If only I had some tomatoes . . .
posted by IvoShandor at 5:54 AM on March 24, 2009


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