Join 3,417 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)


Law enforcement and intelligence agencies now have access to software that can remotely record every keystroke and see every file on a target PC.
June 4, 2001 2:45 AM   Subscribe

Law enforcement and intelligence agencies now have access to software that can remotely record every keystroke and see every file on a target PC. Data Interception by Remote Transmission (D.I.R.T.), developed by Codex Data Systems (you need a username and password to get past the opening screen) can supposedly see through PGP, firewalls, whatever you throw at it apparently. Only works against Win95 so far, but that won't last. Is this hogwash or something crucial?
posted by aflakete (15 comments total)

 
hogwash
posted by metaxa at 2:56 AM on June 4, 2001


If it can get by the obstacle known as 'a PC which isn't connected to the Internet', then I'll be impressed.
posted by darukaru at 3:19 AM on June 4, 2001


This isn't as powerful as the subseven trojan, or at least is no more powerful as regards snooping on the user. Well, actually the taking down local firewalls part is pretty cool.

> If it can get by the obstacle known as 'a PC which isn't
> connected to the Internet', then I'll be impressed.

DIRT might not, but most industrial nations can:
http://www.eskimo.com/~joelm/tempest.html

Now if they can read my mind, then I'll be impressed.
posted by eth0 at 3:35 AM on June 4, 2001


Bwuhahaha!
posted by gimli at 4:55 AM on June 4, 2001


now everyone will know that i play snood!
posted by moz at 7:17 AM on June 4, 2001


D.I.R.T.TM software is completely transparent to the target and cannot be detected by current anti-virus software.

Here's a little ethics/legal issue. Would Norton or Trend Micro update their products to detect goverment endorsed snooping trojans? They could be liable for interfering with a legal wire tap. Eventually someone is going to pick up on mysterious packets and investigate it, if its a government authorized trojan is it really a trojan at all?
posted by skallas at 7:24 AM on June 4, 2001


It's just a Back Orifice style trojan combined with lots of hype and marketing exaggeration. This is not news; it was discussed in places like NWO and cypherpunks 2 years or more ago, when the Codex folks started sending out press releases.
posted by ffmike at 9:35 AM on June 4, 2001


Snood is probably one of the reasons why I never started a term paper until 11pm the night before it was due for the last two semesters. I'd sit down at my computer and just see that little blue face icon smiling at me. That is one addicting game.

Too bad the colors practically scorch your cornia.
posted by tomorama at 10:52 AM on June 4, 2001


If a computer isn't connected to the internet and is using a wireless keyboard, it can still be tracked.
posted by dave at 11:27 AM on June 4, 2001


backslashenterjyadotcomenternewlinemetafil...opps sorry
posted by clavdivs at 12:07 PM on June 4, 2001


It's been my understanding from postings in another forum that this product (and possibly also the company) are vaporware.
posted by baylink at 12:22 PM on June 4, 2001


Thanks for the feedback everyone. I'm not an advanced user and I'm new to the subject, but interested in the implications. Apparently The Register took note of the cryptome posting and has technical advice if this is taken seriously/is a reality.
posted by aflakete at 1:06 PM on June 4, 2001


Anyone else struck by the similarity between CDS' logo and a swastika? It's subtle...
posted by fooljay at 2:46 PM on June 4, 2001


Yeah- subtle like a train wreck.
posted by dogwelder at 10:21 PM on June 4, 2001


Codex Data Systems is run by a Federally convicted criminal (Frank Jones). Taken from this errata piece about someone else:

"Burroughs does not mention the company Vranesevich keeps either. Like Frank Jones
(aka Spy King), who was found guilty to felonies involving defrauding the government.
As a result, Frank Jones plead insanity. As a result, both Jones and associates
are not allowed to consult for any government agency. Vranesevich was the keynote speaker
at Jones' last seminar with a handful of attendees. Vranesevich's partners betray his
image of the law abiding citizen."
posted by bkdelong at 3:43 PM on June 5, 2001


« Older AIDS rate is going up among minorities and young g...  |  More UK political, flash 5 tie... Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments