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April 2, 2009 1:43 PM   Subscribe

Moleskine nerds of the world, rejoice! You can now easily design and print your own custom pages. (Moleskine geekery here, and elsewhere.)
posted by jbickers (78 comments total) 21 users marked this as a favorite

 
The site is being hit so hard it's stopped crying and gone limp.
posted by The Whelk at 1:45 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


Ok...awkward.
posted by dersins at 2:01 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


It's the same as what Franklin planners have been doing for a decade, but cooler because it says "moleskin".
posted by GuyZero at 2:02 PM on April 2, 2009 [2 favorites]


+e
posted by GuyZero at 2:02 PM on April 2, 2009


So does it raise or lower my Cool Level if I want to use this to put D&D character sheets into my Moleskine?

What if I do it ironically?
posted by robocop is bleeding at 2:05 PM on April 2, 2009 [4 favorites]


Star Frontiers, cool.

4th Ed D&D, not cool.

3rd Ed, somewhat cool.

1st Ed, only cool ironically.

I know, it's complex.

And did I miss the full-custom part? All I see are examples of how to put your appointments into your moleskine. I don't see designing custom hex paper or anything. I am fully prepared to admit that a hex paper moleskin would be AWESOME.
posted by GuyZero at 2:14 PM on April 2, 2009 [2 favorites]


Funny you should say that, the first thing I thought when I saw this post was "hex paper!"
posted by COBRA! at 2:16 PM on April 2, 2009


GuyZero: got a link to the Franklin stuff? I couldn't find anything on their site, but I'm probably just using the wrong search terms. As much as I love pretending to be an notebook elitist, I love not spending loads of money much more.
posted by niles at 2:16 PM on April 2, 2009


robocop, it can only be ironic if you include a Witchalok character, because he's so ironically awesome.

Otherwise, you'll have to roll 2x10 and get a 12 or better for people to think you're taking this too far.
posted by filthy light thief at 2:18 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


Okay, not being snarky or intentionally contrarian, but could someone PLEASE explain to me what the deal is with the moleskine? I mean, it's just a stupid notebook, right? Is there something fantastic or magical about it? Or is it like the Nalgene bottle, which is better than every other plastic bottle by virtue of having the word Nalgene printed on it?
posted by Afroblanco at 2:19 PM on April 2, 2009 [7 favorites]


They're more like the Air Jordans of notebooks. Everyone that buys one (me included) is hoping to have the hang time of Van Gogh or Hemingway.
posted by Enema Bag Jones at 2:25 PM on April 2, 2009 [8 favorites]


Uhhh... not sure...The bottom of this page? PlanPlus is not exactly the best piece of software ever, but it print standard Franklin planner pages with your stuff on them. Then you stick 'em in your binder.

They have a Custom Forms product but I've never used it. They have 8.5x11 pages that are pre-perforated so you just run'em through your standard printer and throw away the part that doesn't fit in your planner.

But, snark aside, Franklin planner certainly aren't as cool as Moleskines. Unless you enjoy the wry humour of Wiley in which case Franklin planners have the market cornered.
posted by GuyZero at 2:26 PM on April 2, 2009


Afroblanco, spend some time on my third link and you'll start to get a feel. The brand has evolved this whole culture, kinda like how Starbucks isn't really about coffee anymore. Now, whether you think that's ridiculous or not is another matter, but the fact is, the people that love these notebooks love these notebooks.
posted by jbickers at 2:28 PM on April 2, 2009


I just wish they made decent notebook, with properly-sized paper for ink, non-pvc coated covers, that wasn't just a hyped-up Made-in-China pad from the dollar store.
posted by scruss at 2:33 PM on April 2, 2009 [2 favorites]


Afroblanco: The Moleskine is a very useful tool, as it's well-designed, lightweight, water resistant, has acid-free paper, a sewn-binding, and a handy pocket. This brand is available in numerous countries. For people like me, who use notebooks extensively every day, and need to carry them around, Moleskines are convenient and effective.

The alternatives are not suited for long-term usage and archival. Most paper sources are very temporary/cheap ( post-its, flimsy wirebound notebooks, gum-bound notebooks which fall apart, hipster PDAs with wandering loose cards) or you get these ostentatious "designer" leather monstrosities which need a scriptorium and which have only a few pages.
posted by honest knave at 2:34 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


Afroblanco, if you're used to el cheapest fifty-cent notebooks, Moleskines are a nice step up. Decent paper, cover, and binding. There's a ribbon. There are other companies that do this, too. I think Moleskine did a good job placing their notebooks in bookstores rather than in the stationary bucket.

I fill a lot of notebooks and keep things around for a while. I buy them from different places and different companies. I wind up getting a lot of moleskines. I guess I like them.
posted by fantabulous timewaster at 2:36 PM on April 2, 2009


GuyZero - Well, obviously I'll have one moleskine for each edition (including True First and 3.5). Each will be bedazzled. The printer ink I will use will be anoited with Gygax ashes ala Gruenwald and the girls who make me feel so awkward will never trouble me again.

They will be magic tomes.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 2:40 PM on April 2, 2009 [3 favorites]


The PI of my lab bought them for everybody for taking notes, writing down ideas, etc.

The entire pad fell out of the book binding within a month. Now the cover is peeling apart.
posted by Dr.Enormous at 2:42 PM on April 2, 2009


Afroblanco, it is a white person thing.
posted by vronsky at 2:48 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


NO GODDMAN WAY.

Gruenwald deserves his own FPP.
posted by GuyZero at 2:49 PM on April 2, 2009


Moleskines are good for writing and drawing in because the paper is high-quality. Fewer aggravating moments involving pens skipping and blotting, no bleed-through or show-through, and the covers are durable, so they're excellent bash-about notebooks.

For daily use, I have a Rhodia pad tucked in a trouser pocket. The paper's a little thinner and the cover is thin cardstock that gets grotty with wear but never wears out. They're comparatively cheap (two bucks-ish, depending on exchange rate) and the paper is of a similarly high quality that makes writing and sketching pleasurable. I rarely use my Moleskines but the Rhodias are used almost daily.

They're just notebooks, but they're very well-made notebooks. If you want or need a well-made notebook, you can't go wrong with one of them. If you don't want or need one, or the quality of paper or construction details aren't important, there are a lot of better-priced pads.

If you're sniping because somebody appreciates something you don't, well, your favorite (band|pizza|graphics card|beer|politician|text editor|gender) sucks too.
posted by ardgedee at 2:49 PM on April 2, 2009


The brand has evolved this whole culture

I'm actually going to go with "Intelligent Design" this time around. The Moleskine brand is as spontaneous as a Britney Spears concert.
posted by GuyZero at 2:51 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


How is "Moleskine" pronounced?
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 2:57 PM on April 2, 2009


How is "Moleskine" pronounced?

Mole - a - skin - a, right?
posted by nitsuj at 3:06 PM on April 2, 2009


It's pronounced as if it were the hide of a blind, subterranean rodent.
posted by CKmtl at 3:07 PM on April 2, 2009


Apparently, with an Italian accent. Follow the link to hear someone say it aloud.
posted by GuyZero at 3:08 PM on April 2, 2009


Star Frontiers, cool.

4th Ed D&D, not cool.

3rd Ed, somewhat cool.

1st Ed, only cool ironically.


What, no 2e? Grievous oversight.

could someone PLEASE explain to me what the deal is with the moleskine

I wanted to hate them, because a lot of the people who are totally the way I never want to be love them, but I have to say they are very nice little notebooks. Good look and feel, along with the sturdiness already mentioned. I just wish I didn't look like a hipster douche when I pulled mine out.
posted by adamdschneider at 3:10 PM on April 2, 2009


What, no 2e? Grievous oversight.

There are things of which we do not speak.
posted by GuyZero at 3:14 PM on April 2, 2009


Does the last syllable rhyme with "gin" or with "brine"?
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 3:18 PM on April 2, 2009


Does the last syllable rhyme with "gin" or with "brine"?

It rhymes with "ook" as in "notebook".
posted by adamdschneider at 3:19 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


Hmm, maybe I need a moleskin/muji mash up?
posted by Artw at 3:24 PM on April 2, 2009


Hey, are you hating on AD&D 2e? WTF, that was the one we always played with.
posted by Artw at 3:25 PM on April 2, 2009


Where does 2nd Edition fall in? That is where I stopped playing.

waits anxiously
posted by never used baby shoes at 3:27 PM on April 2, 2009


Or, what Artw said.

makes a note in journal to use preview button more diligently
posted by never used baby shoes at 3:28 PM on April 2, 2009


I have a Rhodia pad tucked in a trouser pocket

Actually I'm going to dodge artw completely and say I also like Rhodia pads. Their graph paper steno pads are very good and even have perforated edges at the top if that's what you like.

I'm just shitting about 2nd Ed. Relax, unless you're also having a dull day, in which case, flame away excitedly to try to put some veneer of passion back into your life and mine.
posted by GuyZero at 3:30 PM on April 2, 2009


Word, Artw. Am writing up my Thri-Kreen in my Mole-skeen as we speak.
posted by nicolas léonard sadi carnot at 3:30 PM on April 2, 2009


Gruenwald deserves his own FPP.

Yeah, he was really ahead of his time. His Squadron Supreme touched on the complicated theme of "what it means to save the world" before it was seen in the likes of Watchmen and Red Son and so on. If he was British, we'd be talking about him in the same breath as Morrison, Gaiman, and Moore.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 3:33 PM on April 2, 2009


To expand on Enema Bag Jones' point, here are some well-known past users, and fanboy blogs who post moleskine sightings and obessions. There are shades of Mac-like enthusiasm.
posted by filthy light thief at 3:34 PM on April 2, 2009


Am writing up my Thri-Kreen in my Mole-skeen as we speak.

I had that set of cards.

If he was British, we'd be talking about him in the same breath as Morrison, Gaiman, and Moore.

But is the ashes in the ink thing for reals? Because that puts him waaaaay past Moore into actual comic book character territory.
posted by GuyZero at 3:36 PM on April 2, 2009


Word, Artw. Am writing up my Thri-Kreen in my Mole-skeen as we speak.

Fuck that. We do xixchil in my moleskine.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 3:36 PM on April 2, 2009


Yeah, the ashes thing is real.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 3:39 PM on April 2, 2009


I've never understood the allure of the moleskine. Then again, I'm an AMPAD 22-156 Computation Book man. Nice thick, buff colored, numbered graph paper sewn into thick covers. There's also the 22-157 which is spiral bound so it will lay flat, but I like the security of sewn-in pages.

On preview, I see the cachet is based on famous users. I can see that. I looked for a list of famous users of 22-156s but couldn't find one. I'll wager there's quite a few though, since the 22 series is required in many engineering colleges.
posted by ob1quixote at 3:46 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


here are some well-known past users

Well-known? Sure. Past? Yup. Users? Not quite.
posted by CKmtl at 3:49 PM on April 2, 2009


Fewer aggravating moments involving pens skipping and blotting, no bleed-through or show-through, and the covers are durable, so they're excellent bash-about notebooks.

My problem is with ink float, where I can write a whole page with my Pilot G2 and then it doesn't get absorbed or dry fast enough, so it leaves little black dots all over the facing page when I flip to the next.
posted by smackfu at 4:02 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


I've never understood the allure of the moleskine. Then again, I'm an AMPAD 22-156 Computation Book man

I love my indestructible Ampad, but it doesn't fit in my pocket.

The appeal of moleskine books is not in their "heritage" so much as their ergonomics. It's much harder to take out my ampad and write notes while I'm walking, but it's pretty easy to do that while holding a pen in one hand and my moleskine in the palm of the other.
posted by deanc at 4:16 PM on April 2, 2009


Yeah, he was really ahead of his time. His Squadron Supreme touched on the complicated theme of "what it means to save the world" before it was seen in the likes of Watchmen and Red Son and so on. If he was British, we'd be talking about him in the same breath as Morrison, Gaiman, and Moore.

Is it traded?
posted by Artw at 4:22 PM on April 2, 2009


The brand has evolved this whole culture, kinda like how Starbucks isn't really about coffee anymore.

There are shades of Mac-like enthusiasm.

I think I'm beginning to understand.
posted by Afroblanco at 4:23 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


I think I'm beginning to understand.

You just grew a soul patch.
posted by Artw at 4:24 PM on April 2, 2009


FLT, I was going to take exception to your comment, but checking wikipedia, you're correct; SS predated Watchmen by a year. That said, I think Watchmen did a considerably better job, but the trope of re-imagining DC characters in a distopic light is definitely the same.
posted by lekvar at 4:40 PM on April 2, 2009


Moleskyne? Or is it Moleskeen?

Or is it Italian (mo-luh-SKEE-neh)
posted by Zambrano at 4:42 PM on April 2, 2009


Does this do anything I can't already do with LaTeX?
posted by kaibutsu at 4:47 PM on April 2, 2009 [1 favorite]


Red Son is neat and all, and I don't particularly share the over reverency for Watchmen, but putting Red Son in the same sentence as Watchmen seems really wrong.
posted by Artw at 4:54 PM on April 2, 2009


(mo-luh-SKEE-neh)

According to the company PR department, this is the correct pronunciation. I still say MOLE-skin, tho.
posted by jbickers at 5:16 PM on April 2, 2009


Zambrano: It's the third way you put it, the Italian pronunciation because it is an Italian company.
posted by Deflagro at 5:16 PM on April 2, 2009


I was into Moleskines when they first came out, but over time I came to dislike the thick binding and lack of a size that really worked for me.

Then they came out with the Cahiers. Paper covers and in sizes (L and XL) that worked better for me than the other options. I could fold them and bend them and the spine wasn't thick under my left hand and making it hard to write. (You won't believe how much as a left-handed I hate spines, ring binders, and spiral binding.) Plus, they're cheaper than the regular Moleskines. I use them for work all the time.
posted by dw at 5:54 PM on April 2, 2009


smackfu: Fewer aggravating moments involving pens skipping and blotting, no bleed-through or show-through

Unless you write with a fountain pen.
I'm very unconvinced by the supposed paper quality of Moleskine notebooks. Rhodia and Clairfontaine notebook paper is far cleaner and sharper, in my experience (and cheaper).
posted by normy at 5:57 PM on April 2, 2009


Yeah, I was skeptical about them as "just a notebook, right?" at first too. But I asked for a sample for Xmas. Nice paper, nice design, good binding, etc. Plus it's pretty hard to find "squared" (i.e. graph paper) notebooks for a reasonable price elsewhere.
posted by DU at 6:03 PM on April 2, 2009


What I really want to do is design my own agenda page layout, and have them bind it for me in a skinny little book. The MSK page gives me the impression that I can just add images or events to their existing layout -- is that correct?

Also: huge advantage to Moleskines: you can put several vertically on a shelf, next to each other, neatly. Try that with spiral-bound notebooks or 3-ring binders and you'll have a mess.

You can also throw them in a bag without worrying that the pages will get messed up. The cover elastic keeps the pages protected.
posted by amtho at 6:12 PM on April 2, 2009


Moleskine datebooks are not that wonderful.
I have messed up at least one appointment because the lettering is so inconspicuous and the pages are thin (easy to miss a page). Now when I list my my deadlines and appointments, I scrawl the actual date across the printing so I can't miss it.
I would also like to see U.S. holidays. I write them in from a regular calendar.
The secret pockets in the back cover rock, though.
posted by bad grammar at 6:15 PM on April 2, 2009


Nice paper, nice design, good binding, etc. Plus it's pretty hard to find "squared" (i.e. graph paper) notebooks for a reasonable price elsewhere.

Oh but that said, I don't get this new development and I've been there 3 times. Why do I need their help to print out a piece of paper that I fold and tuck into my notebook?
posted by DU at 6:42 PM on April 2, 2009


When Moleskine makes a notebook filled with paper that handles ink like Basingwerk AND transmits the resulting drawings instantly to the net, I may give in and get one.

In the meantime I'll keep on sewing my own.
posted by pernoctalian at 7:18 PM on April 2, 2009


You guys all know about the free custom graph paper site, right? Cuz its teh awesome.
posted by shothotbot at 7:20 PM on April 2, 2009 [3 favorites]


OK, said it before, but it's a new Moleskine thread, so I'll say it again.

If you like fountain pens, with lush, flexy nibs for lovely figuration, and you would love you some Moleskine, except the paper either 1) sucks because it's too thin or 2) is oaktag, and you get, like three sheets, here's the solution:

Buy the thin-papered moleskine, unlined is my fave, and load up your pen with Mont Blanc blue-black. It looks like cigarette smoke draped over snow, lovely to look at, and with no bleed-thru.

As much as I love my Pilot gels in .7 and 1.1mm, and I love my Pilot Varsity in turquoise over pale yellow notepaper, they're no good with the 'skines.

I use MB Blue-black with my 'skines... and now that they're more available, .9mm/1.0mm pencils lay down a damn fine line, lots of figuration, with replacement leads now at every Staples or Office Max. They won't bleed through a tissue, nevermind a moleskine page.

I solved this problem entire by buying a leatherbound pocket journal with hand-made paper, about the same size, but twice the depth of a Moleskine, for the same pagecount, at about the same price, from the local art supply store. Free-trade product from Nepal, and takes the worst that Waterman Blue or Private Reseve Tanzanite from an extra-broad flexy nib can lay on it. Or, you know, a two buck Pilot G2.

Yes, I am a pen-nerd.
posted by Slap*Happy at 7:59 PM on April 2, 2009 [2 favorites]


> Rhodia and Clairfontaine notebook paper is far cleaner and sharper, in my experience (and cheaper).

Clairfontaine is a lot harder to get hereabouts, and even by mailorder I only seen them in standard schoolroom notebook sizes. I like the smaller sizes of Moleskine.

Miguelrius books aren't bad either, easier to find and cheaper too. But they lack amenities like stiff covers with elastic bands, and the larger number of pages means it's harder to make them lie flat to write on.

I don't think that Moleskines are the be-all and end-all of notebooks, but of their kind they're the easiest to find.
posted by ardgedee at 8:01 PM on April 2, 2009


I think the principal appeal of the Moleskine was that it is robust and sturdy, convenient, high quality and had something of a heritage. I bought one when it first came out (yeah that's right, I was an early adopter, suck it!)and then I bought a bunch more because I liked the way they felt and I enjoyed writing in them (they're actually a very serviceable replacement for a wallet, what with the little pocket in back, but that wears out pretty quickly with frequent use).

Now the principal appeal of the Moleskine is that it's a Moleskine and it's big with that very particular subset of badger-headed misanthropes who read 43 Folders and think they need to be efficient with everything. Must be more efficient! What pen will make me more efficient? How can I "hack" my "Hipster PDA" (cards held together with a bulldog clip) to be twice as efficient? I'm very busy, I have a lot of efficiency seminars to get to! Look at all these emails I keep getting on my iPhone! What's this one? A neat "hack" for writers is to always have a pen and some paper close by in case they want to write things down? HOLY SHIT THAT'S GOING ON MY BLOG!

The Moleskinerie site linked above treads a fine line between interesting twaddle and pretentious twaddle.
posted by turgid dahlia at 8:46 PM on April 2, 2009 [4 favorites]


I hate your disease, too, Turgid! Haaaaaate! Hsss!

Puppies? They suck, too.
posted by Slap*Happy at 9:13 PM on April 2, 2009


Can someone explain wtf this is because the web site is terrible. It looks like you can order Moleskines with your own text or layout on them... is that correct? If so, how many pages can you customize? Can you make a book with this thing? I thought at first it was just custom design one page and then it gets printed 192 times but in the illustration on the site, each of the displayed three pages has a different layout. Clicking help, explore, etc, only confuses things further.

Could this new site be any shittier?
posted by You Should See the Other Guy at 9:20 PM on April 2, 2009


I bought a Moleskine years ago (2003 I think?), but I hated the binding--it always felt overly stiff, and the pages seemed just a bit too narrow. And I never loved the elastic closure. For a few years I alternated between books I made myself and, when I was lazy, some other store bought brands--Target, for awhile, was selling cheap, colorful moleskine rip-offs that worked in a pinch, because, at least if they weren't perfect, well, they were cheap.

I recently picked up one of these and it's terrific. The book is the perfect size and just feels right. The pages are nice and wide, there's a pocket in the back, and the magnetic closure protects the pages. It was a few dollars cheaper than the equivalent moleskine, and the company's books are mostly just really pretty. Maybe it's a bit more ostentatious-looking than a moleskine, but I'd recommend them for anyone who hadn't been fully satisfied by moleskine quality.
posted by PhoBWanKenobi at 9:50 PM on April 2, 2009


I love my moleskine, I'll admit it. I've even got a few people hooked on the things. Currently my set-up is as follows: I buy the soft cover version in a three pack, college ruled (and stupid over-priced, but hey - it's loooove.) I have the datebook, used daily, and I fit the notebooks on top of the datebook, using the datebook's elastic strap. Wedged into the notebook is my Cross pen, but prior to the pen I used golf pencils. (Side note: IKEA has loads of golf pencils for the taking.)

I've tried a lot of different options, but nearly always ended up with torn, stained, unusable notebooks. I resisted the whole Moleskine cache, but in the end, the damned things just worked better.

I have to admit, I miss the pencils, as they had a There Will Be Blood feel.
posted by elwoodwiles at 12:20 AM on April 3, 2009


I love Moleskines. I have about 5 of them.

They're all completely blank.

I think you need a certain ego to use a Moleskine. You think, "I am an Important Person with Important Thoughts, like Da Vinci or Merlin Mann. I must write these thoughts on something elegant and durable so that they will last forever."

Whenever I pick one up, I think, "Is what I'm about to write important enough to write in a beautiful Moleskine? To be the first page even?" and I answer "no" and I fill another $2.00 Mead notebook with notes and scribbles.

Also, I hate the lack of perforations. It embodies the Moleskine attitude that whatever you write should be preserved forever on a shelf full of Moleskines. I, on the other hand, want to tear out and throw away 90% of what I write.

I did recently discover Rhodia notebooks and was pleased to discover that they aren't elegant enough to stop me from using them, and the paper works perfectly with my fountain pens. "Black and Red" notebooks are also great, and available at Office Depot.

Also, Field Notes has almost as much Geek Cred as a Moleskine but is cheap enough that I can actually use them. Doane Paper is also cool if you like grids.

P. S. If the web site in the FPP made any sense at all we could use this thread for something other than hating on Moleskines.
posted by mmoncur at 12:33 AM on April 3, 2009 [4 favorites]


I find the Moleskine culture unbearably pretentious, selling a high art/culture/literary/brow image on the back of a fairly mediocre notebook. The same shtick might work if they were as high-quality as, say, the Sennelier notebooks, but even the proportions of Moleskines seem very limited and officey and awkward relative to the brand. The stiff binding, and the tall-and-narrowness of the page exacerbated by this, and the cheapness of the covers.

I dig Field Notes (with a Sakura Pigma Micron pen - after much trial and error, no bleed-through!), but enough OMGFIELDNOTES and they might go the way of the Moleskine for me. That said, they're pitching a working notebook with a blue collar inspiration, and maybe it's just finding that more workable (in that it's not pristine, it's not chin-strokey, it's ok to fuck up and so it's easier to use) and easier to buy into as a brand. I like Rhodia and Clairefontaine for the same reason, when I can find them.
posted by carbide at 4:07 AM on April 3, 2009 [1 favorite]


You guys all know about the free custom graph paper site, right?

Sure, use it all the time. But unless I buy special paper to print them on and learn how (and spend the time doing) book binding, a notebook that does not make.
posted by DU at 4:16 AM on April 3, 2009


Paper lust often leads to paper cuts, sadly.
posted by Eideteker at 4:34 AM on April 3, 2009


But yet, it failed me with the gel pen and all my notes on Dutch porn are lost. Alas, lost are the tables and frequency charts with social observations!
posted by jadepearl at 5:34 AM on April 3, 2009


Woah, I am there with the Doane grid/lined paper. Thanks for that tip.
posted by GuyZero at 2:06 PM on April 3, 2009


I was over the whole Moleskine thing. The single, pocket sized ones are pretty thick and fall apart afer daily use carrying in my pocket. The three-pack ones are cheapy and the same price, and those POS paper covers are a joke.

But then they made the two pack. Plastic (?) covers, soft and flexible, but also much higher build quality than the shitty three-pack ones. And they come in colors. And, and, if you get a colored pair, each one is a different shade of that color.

So, now I'm back, trapped.
posted by paisley henosis at 6:58 PM on April 3, 2009 [1 favorite]


Whenever I pick one up, I think, "Is what I'm about to write important enough to write in a beautiful Moleskine? To be the first page even?" and I answer "no" and I fill another $2.00 Mead notebook with notes and scribbles.

So true. I did manage to not flip out when my roommate took one of the tiny stickers from the appointment book to put on his cell phone - and sure, it looked cool, but IT'S FOR THE APPOINTMENT BOOK (the rest of the stickers are still in a box somewhere, along with the book). Beyond that, I don't know if I used more than a handful of pages in any notebook.
posted by niles at 10:26 PM on April 3, 2009


From what I can tell this MSK thing allows you to design a PDF that you print out yourself and then stick into you moleskin with glue. What the hell? At first I thought it was custom printing, which is pretty cool. This seems kind of ridiculous, and no better than a Word template.
posted by kcalder at 10:51 PM on April 3, 2009


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