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Mike Tyson's Intergalactic Power Punch
April 13, 2009 2:25 PM   Subscribe

Mike Tyson's Intergalactic Power Punch ROM (for NES) released. (Via.)
posted by Prospero (30 comments total) 4 users marked this as a favorite

 
That... is terrifying.

I approve.
posted by verb at 2:29 PM on April 13, 2009


Pretty excited about this, will definitely be checking it out when I get home from work.
posted by SpiffyRob at 2:34 PM on April 13, 2009


Does Nintendo sue people for 'selling' rare games by uploading them to forums? Is it legal to upload (what I would imagine is copyrighted) data for a price?
posted by solipsophistocracy at 2:50 PM on April 13, 2009


Eh, the YouTube clip was far more than enough. The game itself has little useful entertainment value.
posted by Burhanistan at 2:57 PM on April 13, 2009


Worth it for Space Lizard-Horse Don King alone.
posted by Uppity Pigeon #2 at 2:58 PM on April 13, 2009


Pretty excited about this, will definitely be checking it out when I get home from work.

If you're expecting to actually play the game and have fun, prepare to be massively disappointed. I've played Power Punch II (which it was eventually released as) and calling it bad is an understatement. I loved the original Punch Out, but apparently it was one of those NES sequels that completely ruined all of the good things about the original (another good example would be Skate or Die 2).

Does Nintendo sue people for 'selling' rare games by uploading them to forums? Is it legal to upload (what I would imagine is copyrighted) data for a price?

I believe technically the guy who dumped the ROM is legally entitled to do so, since he's just making a copy of something that he already owns, assuming he legally owns that prototype cartridge. Uploading the game image to a forum and serving the game image from that forum are both probably illegal. The original publisher of the game went out of business, so who knows who owns the distribution rights to it now. Nintendo cares about people sharing old NES ROMs in general, but I doubt they would be too concerned in this case because it's a prototype version of a game that was never released and nobody outside of a handful of collectors would actually want, and because having it available online doesn't really cut into their sales of old games via the Wii.
posted by burnmp3s at 3:00 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


Power Punch II is the crazy-aunt-in-the-attic of the Punch Out!! family.
posted by roll truck roll at 3:01 PM on April 13, 2009


Finally! A video game that lives down to its potential.
posted by blue_beetle at 3:17 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


Before you castigate Wilson for holding the ROM hostage, one should note three things:
1. He has dumped and released many rare ROMs for others in the past

*golf clap*

2. Releasing the ROM to the public devalues his actual cart
Bullshit. Anyone who actually collects this stuff is still going to want the cart itself. Being able to play the game is really only tangentially related to owning the ONLY copy of something.

3. He eventually lowered the asking price to $1500
WOW WHAT A SAINT
posted by graventy at 3:18 PM on April 13, 2009 [2 favorites]


another good example would be Skate or Die 2

I've always defended the half pipe in Skate or Die 2. It had smooth scrolling between 2 screens, a spine ramp, cool tricks, and CJ in the window. It far overshadowed the rest of the game.
posted by foot at 3:31 PM on April 13, 2009


Nintendo does have a legal team that is constantly on the lookout for stuff like this. I would imagine that they, at least, would have a problem with someone reselling copies of their product. If this has hit the front page of Kotaku, or something else they may have alerted them, then I would suggest download now while the getting is good.
posted by P.o.B. at 3:41 PM on April 13, 2009


graventy, are you really sure about #2 there? I've released prototype ROMs before, only to find almost no market for the cartridge due to the ROM having been made available.

Of course, this is the Mac vs. PC of the video game collecting world, so...
posted by vanadium at 3:42 PM on April 13, 2009


(On the plus side, 1) I had the blessing of the company that had released the game and 2) the creator of the system had gone under 12 years prior, so I didn't exactly have legal hurdles to deal with.)
posted by vanadium at 3:46 PM on April 13, 2009


2. Releasing the ROM to the public devalues his actual cart
Bullshit. Anyone who actually collects this stuff is still going to want the cart itself. Being able to play the game is really only tangentially related to owning the ONLY copy of something.


That's an argument that has been played out countless times on gaming/collector forums and is no doubt raging now, but historically it holds true - uncirculated protos, especially those for systems with the popularity of the NES, will always sell for more than those with easily available ROMs. I've been out of the collecting scene for a couple of years now, but NES California Raisins always used to be the oft-quoted example - before being dumped, a proto copy changed hands for a couple of grand but the same copy made "only" $800
afterwards.
Jason in particular catches a lot of flack from parts of the collecting community, but has also been the source of a huge number if titles that would otherwise not be circulating and cannot be blamed for wanting to recover a portion of the large sums he has no doubt expended in acquiring them.
posted by anagrama at 3:58 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


graventy, are you really sure about #2 there? I've released prototype ROMs before, only to find almost no market for the cartridge due to the ROM having been made available.

That could indeed be true; I probably don't understand the market that well. I've always been under the impression that true collectors want physical copies of the actual games.

I'm a half-assed collector. While I have a crazy number of Dreamcast games available to play, most of them are...uh...let's say...backups. Yeah. However, if I went into full collector mode, high on the list would be the Propeller Arena prototype.
posted by graventy at 4:25 PM on April 13, 2009


Shit, Holyfield could have told you that the 1 Byte version of Tyson isn't worth paying for.
posted by BrotherCaine at 4:39 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


another good example would be Skate or Die 2

Really? I remember Skate or Die 2 being pretty fun. Wasn't that the one where you skated through a mall? All I clearly remember about it is the title song, in all its horrible PCM-sampled glory:
"SKATE
OR
DIE!
DIE DIE DIE!
DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE!"

The original was definitely better, though. I owned that one and played it all the time, I only ever rented part 2 (remember renting NES cartridges from the video section at the supermarket? Also, remember video sections at supermarkets?). While we're on the subject, was I the only one that thought the difficulty of the computer opponents in the pool joust went in the opposite direction of what it was supposed to be? I always easily beat the hardest guy (the dude with the purple mohawk), while the geek that was supposed to be easy always gave me the most trouble.
posted by DecemberBoy at 4:59 PM on April 13, 2009 [3 favorites]


I'm a half-assed collector. While I have a crazy number of Dreamcast games available to play, most of them are...uh...let's say...backups. Yeah. However, if I went into full collector mode, high on the list would be the Propeller Arena prototype.

Yeah, it's a crazy market to say the least; I've bought and sold my share over the last decade, but left the market a couple of years ago while still holding onto a half-dozen or so. It's not a cheap hobby to say the least.

Part of the plan in my release, though, was knowing I didn't want to sell the original as I could play it on the original hardware using the prototype cart itself. For those wishing to do the same, well, there are maybe 200-300 flash carts in existence for that particular system.
posted by vanadium at 5:18 PM on April 13, 2009


I can't get past the first guy. Nostalgia whatever... this game blows!
posted by fusinski at 5:28 PM on April 13, 2009


DecemberBoy wrote: Also, remember video sections at supermarkets?

There was a video section at one of the Albertson's here in Tulsa until a couple of years ago. At least one of the locally owned chains still has video rentals.
posted by wierdo at 6:58 PM on April 13, 2009


Wasn't there some weird unreleased penguin game that everyone was apeshit over a couple years ago? Or am I just hallucinating that?
posted by Afroblanco at 7:10 PM on April 13, 2009


There was a video section at one of the Albertson's here in Tulsa until a couple of years ago. At least one of the locally owned chains still has video rentals.

When I was visiting friends in Houston in 2000-2001 or so (I grew up there), I went to a supermarket near my old neighborhood that not only still had a video rental section, but was still renting the same NES cartridges I had rented there in the 80s. I guess they just never bothered to get rid of them. Maybe they're still there.
posted by DecemberBoy at 7:17 PM on April 13, 2009


Before you castigate Wilson for holding the ROM hostage, one should note three things:
1. He has dumped and released many rare ROMs for others in the past
*golf clap*

2. Releasing the ROM to the public devalues his actual cart
Bullshit. Anyone who actually collects this stuff is still going to want the cart itself. Being able to play the game is really only tangentially related to owning the ONLY copy of something.

3. He eventually lowered the asking price to $1500
WOW WHAT A SAINT


Yeah, seriously. That whole paragraph in the article reads like so much "HURF DURF DELICIOUS BUTTER" justification.
posted by ShawnStruck at 6:46 AM on April 14, 2009


another good example would be Skate or Die 2

720?
posted by electroboy at 7:19 AM on April 14, 2009


I recently visited a place called Barcade (as the name implies, Bar with Arcade games) and in the corner saw a relic of my youth-- the original Punch Out.
I haven't played the game in...geez, well over 10 years, but I'm still amazed at how quickly the pattern recognition and movements came back to me. Right down to the 1 hit knockdown on Bald Bull's charge.

Hope when I'm old and senile that my nursing home will have a the arcade standup of PunchOut in the rec room.
posted by Ct314 at 9:39 AM on April 14, 2009


Hope when I'm old and senile that my nursing home will have a the arcade standup of PunchOut in the rec room.

When you're old and senile you get to have hallucinations that you're inside the arcade game when you're actually drooling in your applesauce.
posted by Burhanistan at 9:48 AM on April 14, 2009


I can see the reasoning behind paying more for an undumped ROM - the experience of playing the game will also be rare, not just the item itself. You're less elite if everyone's played the rare game you just bough, even if it was on an emulator or a newly made ROM.

I understand his "ransom" - unless he's independently wealthy, or is paid handsomely for whatever job he has, he could be spending most of his disposable income on his collection. And if his originals are less valuable because he dumps the contents, it makes even more sense. Sure, it'd be great if he knew where to get prototypes for pennies on the pound, but I doubt that's the case too often.
posted by filthy light thief at 1:55 PM on April 14, 2009


Sure, it'd be great if he knew where to get prototypes for pennies on the pound, but I doubt that's the case too often.

It used to be that prototypes were usually found at estate sales, Silicon Valley thrift stores, random piles of dead game companies' assets, etc. where the seller had no idea of the value of what they were selling. Nowadays, though, like in any collecting hobby, it's pretty rare to find valuable stuff randomly like that. It's more common to find stuff priced for way more than it's worth because it's "RARE! L@@K!", even if it's not at all "rare".
posted by DecemberBoy at 5:47 PM on April 14, 2009


When I was visiting friends in Houston in 2000-2001 or so (I grew up there), I went to a supermarket near my old neighborhood that not only still had a video rental section, but was still renting the same NES cartridges I had rented there in the 80s. I guess they just never bothered to get rid of them. Maybe they're still there.

One of the video rental places in my town was unfortunate enough to buy a crapload of Turbo Grafx 16 games when it first came out, which was great because my brother had been unfortunate enough to spend years' worth of allowance on a Turbo Grafx 16. The games were always on five-days-for-one-dollar rental, and we were pretty sure we were the only people who rented them. One day they were all gone, and the clerk told us they'd sold all of them. For $1 each.

What bugs me most is the idea that they were probably bought by some clueless parent who thought they were NES games.
posted by roll truck roll at 8:27 PM on April 14, 2009


did you know? that world court tennis for the turbo grafix 16 also had an rpg mode? or that all innertubes will split the screen into four and allow you to play the evil tennis king?

oh. that's right you did. plus, it is namco on the turbografx-16 and therefore not nintendo; so, boo. in any case, i got your rom right HERE.
posted by the aloha at 4:44 PM on April 28, 2009


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