Snow rollers
April 13, 2009 5:47 PM   Subscribe

Gorgeous pictures of snow rollers.

Snow rollers! Who knew that such a thing existed? The world is an amazing place.
posted by Joe in Australia (36 comments total) 24 users marked this as a favorite

 
neat!
posted by HuronBob at 5:50 PM on April 13, 2009


Whoa.

Reminds me of a friend who was driving through the west when a tumbleweed blew across the road in front of his car. He jumps out, planning on putting it in the back of his SUV for the ride back east. Email sent to those of us back east: DAMN TUMBLEWEEDS ARE BIGGER THAN THEY LOOK.
posted by R. Mutt at 6:02 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


Pshh, no way those are real. I don't see a hapless duck sticking out the top of even one of those.

But, seriously, I'm pretty happy that these are an actual thing.
posted by Uppity Pigeon #2 at 6:02 PM on April 13, 2009


So strange. They look exactly--in shape and distribution--like bales of hay arrayed in the fields.
posted by oneironaut at 6:03 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


Wow. I didn't bother to scroll down on the first link, and skimmed the wiki page assuming it was a lot of froth and these were maybe just a couple inches in diameter. Sorry.

These are pretty cool.
posted by Science! at 6:03 PM on April 13, 2009


I think Andy Goldsworthy has a good chance of winning a copyright infringement suit against this "nature" fellow.
posted by fleetmouse at 6:09 PM on April 13, 2009 [4 favorites]


Please list all other amazingly awesome natural phenomena that I've never heard of.
posted by odinsdream at 6:09 PM on April 13, 2009 [12 favorites]


Whoa, that's cool. What a planet we got here! Thanks!
posted by rtha at 6:14 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


I saw some miniature versions of those on my walk to work the other day. Snow falls off a tree, rolls down a hill a bit, presto - snow marshmallows.
posted by oulipian at 6:19 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


Christo, here's a field of snow. Any ideas?
posted by davebush at 6:19 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


Please list all other amazingly awesome natural phenomena that I've never heard of.

Hi :bats eyes:
posted by cashman at 6:25 PM on April 13, 2009 [3 favorites]


odinsdream:

Here's a start...
posted by drinkcoffee at 6:26 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


We have them in the Washington North Cascades too!
posted by in the methow at 6:30 PM on April 13, 2009


Please list all other amazingly awesome natural phenomena that I've never heard of.

Ice circles. YT. Previously.
posted by CKmtl at 6:33 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


They've been on metafilter before.
posted by delmoi at 6:40 PM on April 13, 2009


yeah, well your mother was a snowblower!

oh, snow roller? cool.
posted by nadawi at 6:47 PM on April 13, 2009


Holy cow! I want high-res copies of these for backgrounds. Where I live we don't get snow nearly that great.

because we don't get snow :(
posted by fireoyster at 6:50 PM on April 13, 2009


The boulder racetrack?
posted by agentofselection at 6:54 PM on April 13, 2009 [1 favorite]


Hay tends to do something similar
posted by mattoxic at 7:17 PM on April 13, 2009


I've had these come rolling down across the runs when I was night-skiing before. One night there were so many it was difficult to avoid being hit on the narrowest part of the run.
posted by fshgrl at 7:32 PM on April 13, 2009


Racetrack playa at night
posted by hortense at 7:33 PM on April 13, 2009 [2 favorites]


I read this as "snow roller coasters" and was amazed by the work that went into such transient engineering. Consequently, I am probably the only person on the planet who was disappointed by the photographs.

"Oh, just a remarkable natural phenomenon? Who cares?"
posted by Pants! at 8:32 PM on April 13, 2009 [3 favorites]


The sliding rocks freak me out. That's awesome.

The snow rollers I find fascinating, primarily because I grew up in a place with a fuckton of snow (seriously, this is my 5'9" father standing in front of his house yesterday, in mid-April, and that house is an hour further South than where I grew up, with commensurately less snow) and yet I've never seen them outside of the internet. I find it slightly hard to imagine there are snow related things I've never experienced, but I guess we just don't have enough flat open fields and wind to get these things.
posted by jacquilynne at 8:49 PM on April 13, 2009


jacquilynne, i think i takes a special ratio of snow to warmth to wind to create this level of fast moving, slow melting, quick freezing snow. i'm personally glad i don't have to deal with that kinda weather. and i live in massa-fucking-chusetts...
posted by es_de_bah at 9:43 PM on April 13, 2009


So strange. They look exactly--in shape and distribution--like bales of hay arrayed in the fields.

Yeah, if I was just shown those pictures with no context I would assume that it was simply a freshly baled field that had a light snowfall.
posted by Burhanistan at 9:55 PM on April 13, 2009


Kill them before it's too late.
posted by rainy at 9:58 PM on April 13, 2009


My brother had these where he lives in Indiana not too long ago. Pretty darned weird to wake up to, I understand. One thing that the first set of pictures doesn't really capture is that there can be a trail of completely bare ground behind, as the entire layer of snow is peeled away and rolled up like a blanket. So freakin' weird.
posted by madmethods at 10:11 PM on April 13, 2009


They look comical, as if God has a sense of wonder, delight and impish pranksterism.

"I'll just have the snow rolled into these shapes and let's see what they make of that!"
posted by gnuls at 4:20 AM on April 14, 2009


It's like nature is trying to make snow people!
posted by sperose at 5:00 AM on April 14, 2009


At night, the moon cows come.
posted by seanmpuckett at 5:47 AM on April 14, 2009


These are totally awesome.
posted by spinturtle at 5:50 AM on April 14, 2009


Easter Island, nature's way. Thanks for posting this.
posted by yoga at 5:56 AM on April 14, 2009


Cool!
posted by marginaliana at 6:55 AM on April 14, 2009


That's a really cool phenomenon that deserves someone with a better grasp on photography to document it.
posted by HumanComplex at 8:11 AM on April 14, 2009


I always thought these were manmade, like the rolls of hay you see in fields. Thanks for the enlightenment!
posted by Eideteker at 9:11 AM on April 14, 2009


Those are neat, but before I clicked the link, I expected to see some of these.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 9:44 AM on April 14, 2009


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