Skip

It's about quality, not quantity
June 16, 2009 10:52 AM   Subscribe

For generations, anglers have performed worm grunting (a.k.a. charming, fiddling, snoring, rubbing, or calling) to entice worms out of the ground. Worm grunting even has its very own annual festival. After accompanying Grunting King Gary Revell Vanderbilt neurobiologist Kenneth Catania has explained why scraping a "stob" or twanging a pitchfork brings the worms a-callin'.

His scientific, peer-reviewed findings, published in 2008, confirmed what 74-year-old Arkansas fisherman Hansell Hill done coulda told ya back in 2007. And Darwin, before him.
posted by mudpuppie (19 comments total) 4 users marked this as a favorite

 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075261/

;-)
posted by humboldt32 at 10:55 AM on June 16, 2009


For a really good time, take your kids and grandkids, too. This is a great family outing.

Yeeehaaaaa!

What about near roads and driveways? Are they becoming depleted of worms? How far away does the effect extend? That is to say, what "volume" of vibration is enough to elicit a worm and what distance from the road does this volume still obtain (if at all)?
posted by DU at 11:02 AM on June 16, 2009


Or, you can just skip the middleman. [shameless self-link to grabbling FPP.]
posted by not_on_display at 11:04 AM on June 16, 2009


Hey! I've been to Sopchoppy! But not during the Worm Grunting Festival. More's the pity.

Also, I've seen old fishermen use an overturned plastic 5-gallon bucket, a rock and a rasp to grunt up some bait.
posted by BitterOldPunk at 11:05 AM on June 16, 2009


The most incredible thing about that video is how much money there is in earthworms. How can that be? I kinda skipped around, did he mention a big inheritance or a side business as a plastic surgeon or anything?
posted by DU at 11:14 AM on June 16, 2009


Harvest
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 11:25 AM on June 16, 2009


Once, while on my paper route in the dead of 3:00 am, I came around a corner and found a pile of worms like that (only nobody was holding it). Like a rat king but of worms. Scarred and intrigued me for life. WTF was that?

(Just in case anyone CAN answer this question but needs more info: Iowa, after (during?) a rain, on an asphalt road but in a town small enough that I couldn't have been more than a few hundred yards from open fields.)
posted by DU at 11:28 AM on June 16, 2009


Calling the worm.
posted by Meatbomb at 11:39 AM on June 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


My uncle used to put two metal spikes in the ground a few feet apart and hook them up to a car battery. Ten times as cruel, just as effective.
posted by HumanComplex at 11:40 AM on June 16, 2009


"His scientific, peer-reviewed findings, published in 2008, confirmed what 74-year-old Arkansas fisherman Hansell Hill done coulda told ya back in 2007."

That should be "coulda done told ya", not "done coulda told ya". No, seriously.
posted by Bugbread at 11:54 AM on June 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


The early bird catches the worm. But the early worm is breakfast. Are you confident you are the bird?
posted by discountfortunecookie at 12:00 PM on June 16, 2009


All y'all make me want to go fishin' agin. And I done just got back from a fishin' trip. My liver ain't quite recovered from all the sippin' whisky yet.
posted by sciurus at 12:00 PM on June 16, 2009


That should be "coulda done told ya", not "done coulda told ya". No, seriously.

Let me take you to my hometown in Texas and together we'll document the regional variation and then publish an article in a scholarly journal.
posted by mudpuppie at 12:04 PM on June 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


"Let me take you to my hometown in Texas and together we'll document the regional variation and then publish an article in a scholarly journal."

Actually, that sounds pretty cool. My reference point is my hometown (Houston).
posted by Bugbread at 12:07 PM on June 16, 2009 [1 favorite]




I heard this story on NPR a few weeks ago. I for one think it's awesome! I get a kick out of all the old-tyme tricks that people never knew existed.
posted by TomMelee at 12:55 PM on June 16, 2009


They play cornhole at the worm grunting festival?

...what, I'm only seeing horseshoes is all.
posted by Smedleyman at 1:26 PM on June 16, 2009


As a kid, I did this all the time down in Northeast Texas. It was easy for us - our dirt was rich and black, and there were a ton of worms in the earth at least until July - that's when it would generally get too hot to pull them out of the ground. We would just take a stick and shove it deep in the ground, and then use another stick to rub up against the side of the first stick, occasionally tapping it. The worms would just flow out of the ground as fast as we could catch them.
posted by bradth27 at 5:45 PM on June 16, 2009


Jerusalem Boogie to us, perhaps, but to the birds, it means one thing: Supper's Ready.
posted by anazgnos at 11:32 PM on June 16, 2009 [1 favorite]


« Older Sex was the only answer. Total sex.   |   chuck chuck chuck-it-too-ee zhew zhew! Newer »


This thread has been archived and is closed to new comments



Post