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June 29, 2009 4:54 AM   Subscribe

There, I Fixed It - "Epic Kludges + Adventures In Home Pwnership"
posted by fearfulsymmetry (86 comments total) 52 users marked this as a favorite

 
This is a combination of genius and horror. I love it.
posted by Joey Michaels at 5:03 AM on June 29, 2009


It's like my mate's old man (God rest his soul) used to say, "There are only three things you need to get by in life: gaffa tape, a corkscrew, and a credit card."
posted by nudar at 5:05 AM on June 29, 2009


This is great, particularly the hot water solution. Thanks.
posted by tawny at 5:06 AM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


Reminds me of some of the stuff I've seen on Home Inspection Nightmares, courtesy of This Old House.
posted by sugarfish at 5:07 AM on June 29, 2009 [6 favorites]


Some of these are impressive - most are insane
posted by Flood at 5:08 AM on June 29, 2009


I wish I'd kept a pix of my old motor bike, the instrument pod and lights of which ended up being more duct tape than pod/lights after a couple of spills... oh yeah and the seat as well...

And there's a bit of duct tape on the chair I'm sat on right now (OK it's just to stop it wearing when I catch it against the desk... but it's there in spirit)
posted by fearfulsymmetry at 5:14 AM on June 29, 2009


I feel like I've seen most of these in various "redneck inventions" emails from my aunt.
posted by orme at 5:18 AM on June 29, 2009


Tag correction: batshitpoverty
posted by DU at 5:27 AM on June 29, 2009 [6 favorites]


The hot water solution takes the cake. Best used barefoot, standing in a puddle.
posted by Nelson at 5:35 AM on June 29, 2009


It's all fun and games until you realize, thirty years later, that your home's clothes dryer vent was sealed with nothing more than duct tape, and that duct tape eventually fell off (as duct tape will do after several years), venting hot, lint-filled air directly into your wood-frame walls.

(Thank goodness for water pipe leaks requiring the washing room wall to be opened up, leading to the subsequent discovery of an immense build-up of lint, otherwise my childhood home may have become a pile of charred rubble. Now I'll have to ask if they took a picture of it...)
posted by fraula at 5:39 AM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


Homepwner is a great word.

Also, I swear that I have rented from some of these guys.
posted by rokusan at 5:43 AM on June 29, 2009


The hot water solution takes the cake. Best used barefoot, standing in a puddle.

Hey, it's on-demand water heating - all, y'know, eco-friendly. Especially if the person using it gets electrocuted and thereby stops consuming hot water.
posted by XMLicious at 5:46 AM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


Straight from the land of "I cut it twice and it's still too short."
posted by From Bklyn at 5:49 AM on June 29, 2009 [11 favorites]


Some of these photos really don't belong here. Take this one-- I'm no luthier, but that looks like a workshop to me, and I suspect that the tape and string is just there to hold everything in place while the glue dries. And this one may look funny to American eyes, but I'm thinking that if you're in China and your goal is to transport a fire hose to a burning building as quickly as possible, a bicycle is a much more practical solution than a truck.
posted by Faint of Butt at 5:49 AM on June 29, 2009 [3 favorites]


Man, I should have taken some pictures of some of the "Eh, good'nuff" fixes that previous owner performed in our new house. The 'best' was the foundation support that was temporary floor jack resting on a plank of wood which was resting on a crumbling cinderblock. Over a rusting oil tank.
posted by robocop is bleeding at 5:54 AM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


On some backwoods peasant road, a bike might actually work better than a fire engine, if you even had one. However, that's also a seriously old bike and looks like it is parked by an information plaque. Is it a museum display?
posted by DU at 5:58 AM on June 29, 2009


Some of these remind me of things I found while rehabbing this house (they had a soft spot for touch and foam). I have some skepticism about others.

Aand I think that mailbox is actually a forge (and if it isn't, I have some extra Kaowool in the basement so it could be in about half an hour).
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 6:07 AM on June 29, 2009


Rokusan, allow me to introduce you to "remuddled".
posted by Kid Charlemagne at 6:14 AM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


If something can't be fixed with duct tape, cable ties, and/or baling wire, then it can't be fixed at all.
posted by Chocolate Pickle at 6:19 AM on June 29, 2009


Some of these photos really don't belong here. Take this one-- I'm no luthier, but that looks like a workshop to me, and I suspect that the tape and string is just there to hold everything in place while the glue dries.

Nope. My father was, amongst other gifts, a luthier. You wouldn't use string, you could never get the clamping right. You'd never, ever use tape, that would wreck the finish. I seriously doubt there's enough tension in that string to actually to provide any clamping force.

Most importantly, though, you never work on a half-strung guitar.
posted by eriko at 6:20 AM on June 29, 2009


I will sheepish admit that, right now, at this very minute, I have a pair of dish towels wrapped around the leaky faucet serving the washing machine. This was attached three years ago, and they have done their job.

I did this on the observation that, the leak only occurred when the washing machine was running, and the towel was more than sufficient to soak up the water before hitting the floor and allow it to evaporate before leaking out of the towel.

I am ashamed. But happy.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 6:23 AM on June 29, 2009 [4 favorites]


If something can't be fixed with duct tape, cable ties, and/or baling wire, then it can't be fixed at all.

I have a similar saying, but it involves the word "solder" and the phrase "spot welding." Also, "something" would include most medical situations.
posted by Joey Michaels at 6:26 AM on June 29, 2009 [3 favorites]


Most of these I've seen before, on various ha-ha-rednecks-and-poor-people websites; they were funny the first time but it's been a lot of years since then.

I have to say, though, that I'd have no problem having this in front of my house. It's topiary, not a kludge, and I like the asymmetry.

And this one isn't a "homeowner kludge" -- it's what you do when you live in a place where illegal connections are the only way you are going to get electricity. Yes, it's dangerous, and yes, there are safer and better ways to do it -- but only when you have the option of legal, controlled, and regulated electrical service. Otherwise, you just make do.
posted by Forktine at 6:28 AM on June 29, 2009 [4 favorites]


What the hell Why would anyone do that? Don't they know dishes will pretty much dry on their own? They don't need to be hung like clothes.
posted by delmoi at 7:09 AM on June 29, 2009


That site brings back some memories...

I wish I had a picture of the garden-hose/ABS/pipe-clamp/tape sculpture that was our city water hookup, when we bought our house 20 years ago. This modern art was of course inside of an unheated porch so it dutifully froze after the first cold-snap. I managed to install and bury a proper copper pipe a few weeks later.

I pride myself on my above-average MacGyvering skillz, but the cardinal rule is that you do as much as you can with what you've got, which means that if you have the time, you do it properly. Especially if you own it, or have to live with it.
posted by Artful Codger at 7:21 AM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


wow. as a homeowner, i only wish that some of my fixes were this effective and efficient.
posted by msconduct at 7:29 AM on June 29, 2009 [2 favorites]


Duct tape, WD40 and vise grips, thats all.
posted by featherbender at 7:49 AM on June 29, 2009


Nope. My father was, amongst other gifts, a luthier. You wouldn't use string, you could never get the clamping right. You'd never, ever use tape, that would wreck the finish. I seriously doubt there's enough tension in that string to actually to provide any clamping force.

Most importantly, though, you never work on a half-strung guitar.


Embarrassingly, my father is also a luthier, although in my defense this is an occupation he took up after moving out of town. I bow to your expertise.
posted by Faint of Butt at 7:51 AM on June 29, 2009


I guess I should be glad no one documented the 'fence' I made to replace the missing gate, that kept my dog in the backyard for 4 years or so til mom made a new gate a Christmas present. I actually have some sort of (non-working) pump someone installed in my basement, in a 'this'll do' hole in the foundation, to keep the basement dry. Funny thing, though, when we replaced the gutters, the basement stopped having puddles and a fountain feature.
posted by notashroom at 7:52 AM on June 29, 2009


My, duct tape looms large in that there tag cloud.
posted by louche mustachio at 8:05 AM on June 29, 2009


Nobody show this blog to my Dad. I assure you, no good will come of it.
posted by louche mustachio at 8:10 AM on June 29, 2009 [5 favorites]


Over the years, I've found that a lot of the more creative home fixes were the result of bad stuff happening right now, and a fix had to be jury-rigged and applied right now. And then, when it is discovered that the fix worked and held, the expense of calling a professional in became avoidable.
posted by Thorzdad at 8:37 AM on June 29, 2009 [6 favorites]


Having just bought a house, in Japan, where preventative maintenance is a myth (it's not uncommon to see twenty year old houses patched in places with corrugated sheet metal) I pray to god we're never in a situation where a fix like any one of these becomes a long-term viable solution. To the people who have to do it because they have no recourse, they have my sympathy. To the people who do it because they think it makes them look cool, or quirky, no. It really doesn't.

(even though we still don't have shelves in the closets, and I make trips to the home center by bicycle because I don't have my driver's license yet)
posted by Ghidorah at 8:40 AM on June 29, 2009


Hey this website is really inspirational to me! I think I'm going to go "fix" something now!
posted by fuq at 9:01 AM on June 29, 2009


What the hell Why would anyone do that? Don't they know dishes will pretty much dry on their own? They don't need to be hung like clothes.

I'm pretty sure that one is photoshopped. I can't imagine the clothespeg (clothespin to you USofAmericans) that would be strong enough to hold a glass baking dish like that. If it's a real photograph, there's superglue involved.
posted by yoink at 9:01 AM on June 29, 2009 [4 favorites]


A few years ago, a next door neighbor of mine repainted his car himself. He had planned the work out carefully ahead of time - the vehicle was cleaned; the grill work was removed; lights and chrome trim were masked or removed where possible; and the glass and wheels were protected. Rust-Oleum (from spray cans), applied in a series of thin, even coats produces a surprisingly appealing result.
posted by Kronos_to_Earth at 9:16 AM on June 29, 2009


It was Archimedes who said, "give me a big enough lever, and I can move the world." It was my endineer who said, "give me a big enough roll of gaffer's tape, and I'll stop it from moving."
posted by StickyCarpet at 9:30 AM on June 29, 2009


engineer
posted by StickyCarpet at 9:32 AM on June 29, 2009


Over twenty years ago my brother talked me into trying that very same method, Kronos. We only got the car half painted before running out of paint and time.

It looked OK from one side...and I never feared the car would be stolen after that...
posted by rahnefan at 9:36 AM on June 29, 2009 [3 favorites]


One of the most inventive fix it jobs I have seen was by a homeless man in NYC. He was walking with a cane which unfortunately had been broken in two. In order to make it useable, he had lashed the grip of a tennis racket to the part of the cane below the break and then again lashed the handle of the racket below the head to the upper part of the cane thereby making it almost as good as new.
posted by digsrus at 9:38 AM on June 29, 2009


The socks on the Rock Band drum kit help the player score higher while making less noise.
posted by infinitewindow at 9:42 AM on June 29, 2009


I like duct tape, but my real tool when performing a masterful act of jury rigging is 14-gauge stainless steel electric fence wire. I bought a 1/4 mile spool of it about fifteen years ago, and I still use it for everything, because it's rigid enough that you feed it through walls or floors or whatever, yet flexible enough that you can easily bend it with your hands. It's strong enough to support a lot of weight, and because it's steel it can withstand some significant heat.

My best fix with it? I needed the functional equivalent of a zip-tie and I didn't have one handy, so the wire went around the two things I needed bound together and both ends went into my electric drill. I hold down the button, the drill twists it and tightly winds the wire together, I clip it off at about 1" and now I have something that will survive stupid amounts of abuse.

Once you know that I use it, you can wander around my house and see it everywhere.
posted by quin at 9:52 AM on June 29, 2009 [11 favorites]


I had assumed that everyone lived like this.
posted by BitterOldPunk at 9:57 AM on June 29, 2009 [2 favorites]


Tag correction: batshitpoverty

I think this is true in large part. Some times you just have to make due. This site reminds me of a 1969 Duster that my mom drove when I was a kid in the early 80's. Something was wrong with the driver's side door latch, and it would sometimes fly open when making turns or going around curves (we lived in rural east Tn, there were lots of curves). We were always cash strapped, and my mom was saving to get a better car anyway, so she just tied a rope to the door and either handed it to the person in the passenger seat, or tied it to the opposite door if she was alone.

And having had to live like this in the past, is the reason that my heart swells with happiness that she was just able to by the first new car she's ever owned (paid cash, in full).
posted by kimdog at 10:28 AM on June 29, 2009 [3 favorites]


They should make an British version of this, called "Suspended in Gaffa."
posted by adipocere at 10:30 AM on June 29, 2009


Rust-Oleum (from spray cans), applied in a series of thin, even coats produces a surprisingly appealing result.

Indeed. I've seen that done with restored, classic cars.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 10:35 AM on June 29, 2009


Rust-Oleum (from spray cans), applied in a series of thin, even coats produces a surprisingly appealing result.

Rust-Oleum is one of the worst brands of paint to use for cars. It doesn't ever get hard the way most enamels or all lacquers do. I once made the mistake of painting a car with copper-metallic Rust-Oleum. Not only did the paint scratch if you looked at it too hard, it tarnished. Blotchy brown with rust pinstriping was not the effect I wanted.

The best spray enamel are usually store-brand cheapos. The defunct Bradlees chain sold one called "Total Living" that was outstanding.

It actually doesn't cost much more to buy a spray gun and some real paint, and rent a compressor. The results are more than worth the small increase in cost.
posted by Kirth Gerson at 10:36 AM on June 29, 2009


obhack
posted by fistynuts at 10:40 AM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


When Mr. Lucinda was remodeling our kitchen and opened up one of the walls, he found live wires surrounded by fifty-year old newspaper.
posted by Lucinda at 10:48 AM on June 29, 2009


Maybe they just don't care what other people think, and they have more important things to do.
posted by zeek321 at 11:00 AM on June 29, 2009


Every room in our house has at least one of these. There is a hole in my wall covered in packing tape and painted (you actually can't really tell). One of the other bedrooms has towels plugging a hole in the floor (next to the sometimes-leaky steam radiators). The front stairs are held up with steel cable that is anchored to the wall underneath. And, best of all, one of the hallways passes through a rather short closet. Through.

Of course, none of this is to code and it's going to cost a lot of money to fix it. So although I don't mind the quirks and charms, I kind of wish people had done a better job of fixing things in the past. On the other hand, the house is 129 years old, so maybe it's too much to expect it to have been well cared-for that whole time.
posted by mai at 11:05 AM on June 29, 2009


Spray-painting a car is nothing. The real do-it-yourselfer uses a roller.
posted by TedW at 11:06 AM on June 29, 2009 [4 favorites]


oops...roller
posted by TedW at 11:07 AM on June 29, 2009 [8 favorites]


The rock band drum set is from the very first sets that were buggy and would register double-hits often. The company replaced them, but the sock + rubber band method fixed them in the interim. It doesn't really fit in with a lot of these fixes, I think.
posted by internet!Hannah at 11:09 AM on June 29, 2009


Ain't anything wrong with this bumper. A 4X4 is stronger than the piece of tinfoil masquerading as a bumper that came factory on those trucks.
posted by Mitheral at 11:10 AM on June 29, 2009


Ain't anything wrong with this bumper. A 4X4 is stronger than the piece of tinfoil masquerading as a bumper that came factory on those trucks.

Yes, well, the problem with these wooden bumpers is that they're typically attached after an accident and bolted directly to the frame or in some other manner that completely defeats the shock-absorption purpose of a bumper. Call them "tinfoil" if you want, but they're supposed to crumple when you get hit.
posted by rkent at 11:16 AM on June 29, 2009 [4 favorites]


Over the years, I've found that a lot of the more creative home fixes were the result of bad stuff happening right now, and a fix had to be jury-rigged and applied right now. And then, when it is discovered that the fix worked and held, the expense of calling a professional in became avoidable.

Yes! (This)

A strong wind broke a tree support in front of my house last week while I was trying to load up the kid & bike into/onto the car & I fixed it with 18-inch long zip ties (it's good to have an assortment) and a piece of rebar & when that didn't work, a piece of 2x4 and a couple more zip ties. I bought a new redwood support and stakes and rope that evening but didn't put 'em up. Didn't get to it this weekend (too hot/kid wants me to work on skate ramp/need to pay bills/too hot) and it's still up.

I should have hacked it less well so I'd be less tempted to leave it hacked.
posted by morganw at 11:23 AM on June 29, 2009




The "eco-friendly Gremlin" reminds me of an idea a friend of mine had for a car: he was going to take the front half of a Gremlin, attach it to the truck bed of an El Camino, and call it an "El Gremlino."

Scoff if you must, but it would've looked cooler than that stupid Chevy Avalanche.
posted by total warfare frown at 11:35 AM on June 29, 2009 [7 favorites]


netbros - those pens are going to be well and trully held, what with all those pen holders.

I like Cassette Tapes Lamp though.
posted by Artw at 12:34 PM on June 29, 2009


quin, check out the Clamptite, a small, ~$25 hand tool that makes/applies clamps out of lengths of wire.

Reviewed at Kevin Kelly's Cool tools, available at Gempler's and Lee Valley.
posted by sebastienbailard at 12:48 PM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


My Ukranian landlord's medium was white silicone caulking. No matter the problem "I fix, I fix - I get caulking."

His most impressive feat was in piecing together a shattered window pane with the stuff - sort of his version of stained glass.
posted by Graygorey at 12:53 PM on June 29, 2009 [4 favorites]


Embarrassingly, my father is also a luthier

This would only happen on MetaFilter.
posted by chrismear at 12:55 PM on June 29, 2009 [7 favorites]


Hanging the dishes outside is silly...they should've just used the clothes dryer.
posted by FireballForever at 12:56 PM on June 29, 2009 [3 favorites]


Spray-painting a car is nothing. The real do-it-yourselfer uses a roller.

When I was a kid, a guy down the street got up one morning and went out to his car armed with a 6-inch brush and a gallon of Sears Best flat white enamel. Painted the whole, damned thing. Took him less than an hour. You can easily guess the look.

It was...awesome.
posted by Thorzdad at 1:03 PM on June 29, 2009


Spray-painting a car is nothing. The real do-it-yourselfer uses a roller.

That was really something. I guess the car I saw that had been painted with a broom defines the opposite end of the scale.
posted by Kronos_to_Earth at 1:10 PM on June 29, 2009


I like duct tape, but my real tool when performing a masterful act of jury rigging is 14-gauge stainless steel electric fence wire.

I've become a big fan of safety wire for all kinds of stuff. The clamptite that sebastienbailard links would probably work about the same as a pair of safety wire pliers, but I bet in skilled hands the safety wire tool is faster.
posted by exogenous at 1:12 PM on June 29, 2009


When i was a kid (in the 60's), there was a guy in my grandmothers town (Bartow FL.) that had painted his car Lime and Yellow with Latex house paint. I was always suprised at how good it looked, although I was distractedby the shag dashboard and the tiny pom-poms lining the windows.
posted by djrock3k at 1:20 PM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


I pwned my draughty windows with duct tape.

I <3 the stuff.
posted by greenish at 1:59 PM on June 29, 2009


Hmm, that Clamptite appears to work completely differently that I would have assumed. I may have to look into one of those.

The safety wire tool seems neat as well; it's a similar to the effect I can accomplish with my drill (it took a lot of practice to get good at it though).

posted by quin at 2:04 PM on June 29, 2009


I agree that while some of these are brilliant in a terrifying way, many are kind of lame. This one, with a pathetically simple wooden rear bumper on a pickup (harumph!) brings to mind my old rear-drive Dodge Colt, which not only had a wooden (front) bumper — it also had a wooden grill. 2×4s screwed together with sheetrock screws, then lag-bolted from inside the engine compartment, with hardware cloth screwed to the front to stop large objects from bashing my newly-re-cored radiator. The hood was held down by parachute cord lashed around a coat hook mounted to the front with bolts. The wooden grillwork wouldn’t fit so that it cleared the headlights, so my dad went slice-by-slice with his radial arm saw to make cutouts for the headlights. Later i replaced the wooden bumper with an old chrome pipe and screwed some old hunks of metal over the hardware cloth for added protection.

As a result of the same accident, the left front quarter of the space frame (i.e., the engine compartment) was weak. So I bolted some old oak flooring pieces inside the engine compartment to strengthen it. I wasn't satisfied with that, so when I got around to re-attachging the fender, I pounded a steel fence post up into the gap between the space frame and the fender to stiffen it a little more.

Finally, I cut up pieces of galvanized steel and mated them wtih old aluminum siding to make up the difference and used them to patch the torn-away parts of the fender. I laid down a bead of silicone and pop-rivited it, bending it down for each rivet to match the curve of the fender.

It was one scary-looking beast when i was done.
posted by lodurr at 2:12 PM on June 29, 2009 [2 favorites]


quin: ... so the wire went around the two things I needed bound together and both ends went into my electric drill.

Oh, shit. That's cool.
posted by lodurr at 2:16 PM on June 29, 2009


Maybe they just don't care what other people think, and they have more important things to do.

Except that many of those things represent a danger to themselves or others. Not to mention the next owner who uncovers untold horrors.

/still bitter about the dumbass previous owner of my home
posted by TungstenChef at 2:18 PM on June 29, 2009 [2 favorites]


My brother in law's brother had a Saab 96 with a cracked frame. He clamped logging chain to the front and back and cranked it down hard, and drove it that way for about six months until it finally just split in two one day.
posted by lodurr at 2:21 PM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


My Polish friend has recognized the cleaners on the sink next to the hot water contraption as the brands available when Poland was under Communism. He also recognized the horse-drawn car as an older Polish car that was once very popular. I'm guessing some of these photos are a decade or two old.
posted by The Light Fantastic at 4:05 PM on June 29, 2009


I'll add my voice to those raised in praise of the hot water solution. With only a little more work, it could become a relatively safe and inexpensive means to get convenient hot water on demand.

Of course, maybe I can't be trusted: I have spray painted a car once. In the parking lot of Pep Boys in South Central L.A. A scruffy guy sitting on one of the cement berms watched me the whole time and when I was done, said "Well, that's ONE way to do it." Then he finished off his fifth of whatever. I'd never felt more connected to that neighborhood than at that moment.
posted by darkstar at 4:13 PM on June 29, 2009 [2 favorites]


Is this where I lament the fact that you can't buy 2# rolls of baling wire of a hefty gage? I think the best I can find is 18ga. and it is just not thick enough.
posted by pointilist at 4:44 PM on June 29, 2009


A lot of these would have looked good to my dad. But he has dementia.
posted by dhartung at 5:09 PM on June 29, 2009 [1 favorite]


I've painted several work trucks with a roller. Tremclad self levels pretty good. You want to make sure it's not windy though.

pointilist: "Is this where I lament the fact that you can't buy 2# rolls of baling wire of a hefty gage? I think the best I can find is 18ga. and it is just not thick enough."

It's not super cheap like baling wire but MIG wire comes in 1lb rolls in a wide variety of guages and materials. I keep a roll of .035 stainless in my truck for emergency use. That way when you don't get around to fixing things in a more permenant way the wire doesn't get rusty.
posted by Mitheral at 5:10 PM on June 29, 2009


This is all very fun unless you grew up in a family that does this all the time. And not out of poverty, but as solidly middle class people with crippling frugality.

I suppose the best example is my brother breaking his glasses and not wanting to pay for a replacement. (We all have strong, astygmatic corrections.) So he took the two bare lenses they gave him back from his previous pair, and glued them inside new frames he made out of used popsicle sticks.
posted by msalt at 9:14 PM on June 29, 2009 [2 favorites]


I know what you're talking about msalt (because I'm kind of like that myself as is my family) and I thought you might be interested to know that in my case it seems to be a symptom of OCPD, Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder.
posted by XMLicious at 9:27 PM on June 29, 2009


MIG wire...hmm. (Thanks)
posted by pointilist at 10:37 PM on June 29, 2009


My Polish friend has recognized the cleaners on the sink next to the hot water contraption as the brands available when Poland was under Communism. He also recognized the horse-drawn car as an older Polish car that was once very popular. I'm guessing some of these photos are a decade or two old.

Actually, I have a good feeling that photo is from more modern times...I live in Poland now, and you can find old Maluchs on the Polish equivalent of ebay today - they're often cheaper than new bicycles. (Here's one for 550 zł - $175.) And Ludwik detergent is still sold, still cheap (less than $1.50 for a liter), and still awesome - the mint scent is insanely aromatic.
posted by mdonley at 2:19 PM on June 30, 2009


Holy crap, the Clamptool web page is an abortive mess. Someone should redo it as an act of mercy.
posted by five fresh fish at 8:41 PM on June 30, 2009


The Naval Safety Center has a great running series of these types of pictures.
posted by Andrew Brinton at 12:48 PM on July 1, 2009 [1 favorite]


That Naval Safety Center series has some pretty funny captions.

I saw a similar series involving errors in loading and tying down freight on trucks, including pictures of the ugly aftermath. I think most of them were taken in Europe. Can't find it at the moment...
posted by exogenous at 1:21 PM on July 1, 2009


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