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the new museum of modern arts
August 9, 2009 3:25 PM   Subscribe

Stunning Conceptual Alternative Design for the New Museum of Contemporary Art Tower
posted by SamsFoster (44 comments total) 1 user marked this as a favorite

 
I like the current one but the axis mundi concept is amazing
posted by SamsFoster at 3:27 PM on August 9, 2009


It looks like two completely different projects are being confused here. The New Museum and MoMA are not affiliated at all, as far as I can tell.
posted by ocherdraco at 3:30 PM on August 9, 2009 [2 favorites]


Clever.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 3:30 PM on August 9, 2009


It's certainly pushing boundaries, and I personally think that art needs to that.
posted by rageagainsttherobots at 3:41 PM on August 9, 2009


Man, a chase sequence in that first tower would be stunning, almost escher-like. The cuts would just make themselves.

(why yes I'm editing video all day today, how did you guess?)
posted by The Whelk at 3:42 PM on August 9, 2009


also JENGA!
posted by The Whelk at 3:43 PM on August 9, 2009 [3 favorites]


Looks a lot like the bottom of my closet.
posted by bz at 3:49 PM on August 9, 2009


Looks leaky. That's a whole lot of separate little roofs on each of those cube modules to maintain.
posted by octothorpe at 3:52 PM on August 9, 2009 [1 favorite]


It looks like an unkempt cactus. I liked it!
posted by Foci for Analysis at 3:56 PM on August 9, 2009


It looks great. Not sure I'd want to live with it 5 years from now though.
posted by Brandon Blatcher at 3:56 PM on August 9, 2009


OMG LOVES IT

probably wildly impractical, though.

They should probably try it out on maybe an 8 or 9 story building first and see how that goes.
posted by empath at 3:59 PM on August 9, 2009


There's something about that sort of 3D, intertwined structure that really tickles something deep in my brain.

I would love to build a house just like that.
posted by lucidium at 4:00 PM on August 9, 2009


I'm confused with the mention of Jean Nouvel and yet no sign of him in the design credits. Nevertheless...this will be difficult to pull off as illustrated. I can see several problems that will never pass a design review - for instance I'd be very surprised if the external walkways ever saw the light of day. That's just seen as way too problematic in such towers, with liability concerns.

The main issue with boring architecture isn't the lack of creativity in architects - it's budget. So they're considering residential use? How much are these units gonna cost? What will the HVAC system look like in that building? Maintenance? Window washing? I could go on...I'm not really a building code guy (I'm a planner) but that just looks like a logistical nightmare with so many potential setbacks from a design review process that the end result will look much, much different. Architects have a tendency to showcase best-case scenarios (summer scenes, plants, walking) but the reality is often much different. 'Breezy' in summer is 'fucking cold' in winter.

I really love it, but I also think the 'building as community' idea died with Corbusier a long time ago. In practice it doesn't work as well as it sounds. I want to be proven wrong.
posted by jimmythefish at 4:01 PM on August 9, 2009 [3 favorites]


Also, looks a bit TOO much like Jenga.
posted by empath at 4:02 PM on August 9, 2009


Ivy Generator makes any building look better.
posted by jfuller at 4:04 PM on August 9, 2009 [2 favorites]


“Later, as he sat on his balcony eating the dog, Dr. Robert Laing reflected on the unusual events that had taken place within this huge apartment building during the previous three months.”
posted by The Whelk at 4:04 PM on August 9, 2009


Finally, a step closer to arcologies!
posted by nasreddin at 4:07 PM on August 9, 2009


Hey, they just put Habitat 67 on its end, ripoff!
posted by Alvy Ampersand at 4:11 PM on August 9, 2009


Finally, a step closer to arcologies!


Great, now my co-op board can strip away my citizenship. Why do I got to be an unperson just cause I wanted an orange welcome mat? Do you know how hard it is to get housing at Greater America Forever Freedom Tower Mark 2?
posted by The Whelk at 4:11 PM on August 9, 2009


Wow, I'm amazed at all the positive comments. I think it looks like shit.
posted by mr_crash_davis mark II: Jazz Odyssey at 4:13 PM on August 9, 2009 [6 favorites]


I'm confused with the mention of Jean Nouvel and yet no sign of him in the design credits.

This is a proposed alternative to Nouvel's Tower Verre.

Also, I agree with you, jimmythefish, that although very cool, it seems like it would be exceptionally expensive to actually do. And this is a bad time to be planning astronomically expensive condos.

Nouvel's design is much more conventional (I like it, but, you know, it's less wild for sure), undoubtedly also extraordinarily expensive, but maybe less so price/sqft in terms of construction costs - I'm no expert though.
posted by huffa at 4:13 PM on August 9, 2009


It looks like a stack of trailer homes.
posted by Partario at 4:26 PM on August 9, 2009 [1 favorite]


Yeah, those are two completely different museums, no matter what you say in the title.
posted by avocet at 4:29 PM on August 9, 2009


I like it. But I wonder how it would withstand a windstorm, with all those corners and facets.
posted by Cool Papa Bell at 4:32 PM on August 9, 2009


It looks like two completely different projects are being confused here. The New Museum and MoMA are not affiliated at all, as far as I can tell.

Ditto. Second link has no relevance to the first.
posted by beagle at 4:44 PM on August 9, 2009


Reminiscent of the Residence Antilla being built (?) in Mumbai.

And as ocherdraco points out, this is a separate proposal with no connection to the real New Museum design other than synergy -- urban museums building, you know, up.
posted by dhartung at 4:52 PM on August 9, 2009


In the middle picture in the fifth row of pictures, I'm pretty sure there's a section built out of Legos.
posted by Tsuga at 4:55 PM on August 9, 2009


The inspiration?
posted by mr_roboto at 5:06 PM on August 9, 2009 [1 favorite]


I think the concept is very interesting, but I think the actual aesthetics of this one are weak. It's halfway between "out there" and "familiar" (and hence comforting) and doesn't land in either one. It reminds me more of a dilapidated Hong Kong high-rise than it does "tower of art."

Nice to see something other than a glass brick, of course.
posted by maxwelton at 5:25 PM on August 9, 2009


That's a special kind of ugly. Hope it never gets built.
posted by monospace at 5:29 PM on August 9, 2009


Their proposal seeks to inform the discussion of the Hines tower and other tall buildings.

I hate this use of "inform," a perfectly nice word that never did anything to anyone.

‘The design reinforces the urban identity of tall buildings,’ observes Beckmann. ‘It suggests new expressive possibilities in an urbanism of difference rather than of homogeneity.

What?

In a city where more than 300 languages are spoken, architecture can celebrate that diversity rather than see it as a problem that must be solved.’

Well, I for one certainly never thought of architecture as some sort of final solution for all those pesky extra languages interfering with my urban homogeneity. "You say you speak Kazakh, my man? Well, I have a multi-use commercial building that will sort you out."

Okay, this article is making me feel cross and itchy. I'm going to go take a benadryl and reread Oath of Fealty.
posted by timeo danaos at 5:47 PM on August 9, 2009 [3 favorites]


I worked at a museum that was next door to MoMA, the American Folk Art Museum. The museums had absolutely no affiliation with each other, but it didn't stop many, many MoMA members from thinking we owed them something or that I would know when MoMA's. It was a constantly aggravating situation, especially when MoMA had their free Friday night lines that blocked our entrance. It was frustrating enough being in the shadow of the behemoth like that, but now I'm especially glad I don't work there since this new tower is going to mean that MoMA surrounds AFAM.
posted by piratebowling at 5:48 PM on August 9, 2009


It is an interesting digital project, although I have to admit the aesthetics don't do much for me. I think it would be somewhere between a horrible idea and just plain stupid to actually try and build it.
posted by meinvt at 6:00 PM on August 9, 2009


This is a proposed alternative to Nouvel's Tower Verre.

Yeah this makes more sense. I didn't think Nouvel would have anything to do with the Beckmann design - it's exactly the opposite of Nouvel's minimalist, airy light and shadow play. Nouvel's a genius with light...this photo I took of his Torre Agbar in Barcelona still boggles my mind with the way the colour works so well and blends so completely with the context. It's truly stunning.
posted by jimmythefish at 6:40 PM on August 9, 2009 [2 favorites]


I am so sick of renderings. I can use structure synth too, and no one's stuffing benjamins up my asshole.

Shut up and build something worthwhile in my city. Stop promising beauty and delivering shit. The past decade of New York architecture has been a parade of cheap, miserable boxes which-- oh, if only my original vision had been realized!, sighs the architect-- we were told was somehow meant to approximate the sleek, futuristic posters that had been plastered around months before.

Done with that. Out of patience. Better luck next time. Oh, and maybe try building units your service class can afford to live in someday, too KTHXBYE
posted by phooky at 8:09 PM on August 9, 2009 [1 favorite]


Looks like a stack of shipping containers, which as we all know is totally cyberpunk.
posted by delmoi at 8:12 PM on August 9, 2009 [2 favorites]



I worked at a museum that was next door to MoMA, the American Folk Art Museum.


Just wanted to say that I loved that museum, and their "Dargerism" exhibit when I visited NYC last year.
posted by troubles at 8:49 PM on August 9, 2009


I strongly dislike things like this. It looks like the designer is completely ignoring all questions of material and practicality; what we have here is a 3D rendering of a space that would be great for a video game and that would be hell to maintain in the real world.

In the real world, roofs leak; in the real world, materials have limited tensile strength; in the real world, it costs more to build extra roofs for no reason; in the real world, wind and storms and catastrophic component failure are actual dangers, and are dangers enhanced by overly complex structures.

Not to mention it has the aesthetic quality of vomit. I wonder, when I see something like this, whether some designers just lack the taste to understand that restraint can be beautiful, too, and that art can enhance the traditional, rather than "transgressing" all over everyone's view.

The best example I know currently that illustrates the problem with rendering versus reality is the Standard Hotel in NYC. The renderings looked pretty normal, with a splash of color for spice. In real life, the damn thing looks like something out of Blade Runner because every possible material was chosen poorly and the design had little grace to it to balance that.
posted by sonic meat machine at 9:15 PM on August 9, 2009 [4 favorites]


Looks leaky. That's a whole lot of separate little roofs on each of those cube modules to maintain.

Wrap it in a big cube. One roof exposed to the elements.
posted by Blazecock Pileon at 9:23 PM on August 9, 2009


The floating head of Marylin Monroe with windows cut into her face is pretty damn odd.
posted by mek at 9:51 PM on August 9, 2009


Nouvel's a genius with light...this photo I took of his Torre Agbar in Barcelona still boggles my mind

great photo. and true. torre agbar is a pretty incredible building. if tower verre ever gets built, and if it turns out nearly as well, nyc will be very lucky to have it. and, as phooky, rightly pointed out. we haven't had much luck in that regard recently.
posted by huffa at 10:23 PM on August 9, 2009


More like "Tower of fucking garbage"-OMA, amireit?
posted by fleacircus at 11:04 PM on August 9, 2009


it's got a bit of slum romance to it, reminds me of kowloon walled city in hong kong, which was demolished over ten years ago. but without the same culture of casual building and cooperative living this is just a simulation of interdependence and the appearance of diversity will probably support the same old autonomy and narrow demographic range as any traditional new york high rise. i'd like to see a practical scheme pursuing similar intentions but with multiple, small interventions in existing high rises, it'd probably be a lot more convincing. given the current economic climate i also wonder if something like camelot - property protection through occupation in europe - could take advantage of any empty buildings in the city whilst introducing affordable, diy'ish units with potential for more sociable/communal uses as a concession.
posted by doobiedoo at 1:25 AM on August 10, 2009


I absolutely adore the new design. Not just because of the freakishness but because of the vertical neighborhood concept.
posted by YukaBot 8000 at 11:01 AM on August 10, 2009


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