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Every Nog Has Its Day
December 21, 2009 1:35 PM   Subscribe

This Saturday in New York City, a couple hundred people gathered to coat their gullets with thick, rich Christmas Joy, in the Eighth Annual Coquito Masters Contest. Interested in trying a Coquito (aka Puerto Rico's version of egg nog)? Here's some recipes! LET'S GET CREAMY!
posted by Greg Nog (30 comments total) 10 users marked this as a favorite

 
also the first one of you who says eponysterical gonna get slapped
posted by Greg Nog at 1:36 PM on December 21, 2009 [4 favorites]


Needs. eponysterical. tag.
posted by lholladay at 1:37 PM on December 21, 2009


Flagged for unnecessary sexualization of FPP.

Not really
posted by Think_Long at 1:42 PM on December 21, 2009


Is it the coconut that makes it unique?
posted by Think_Long at 1:43 PM on December 21, 2009


I question the accuracy of this final line in the first recipe link:
Keep it in the refrigerator and it will last for a very long time.
posted by bearwife at 1:47 PM on December 21, 2009


I've never tried a coquito but I have had plenty of egg nog. Too much egg nog, really. In fact, once I got drunk on egg nog and people still tease me about it. Maybe I shouldn't have done it at the annual fourth of July barbecue.
posted by twoleftfeet at 1:55 PM on December 21, 2009


My mom makes a huge batch of coquito at least once every winter, and as a half Puerto Rican, I'm ashamed to admit that the inclusion of anise will forever prevent me from liking the stuff. For as long as I can remember, the only thing I've ever asked of Santa was the sudden, complete and world-wide disappearance of anything that tastes like anise, fennel, or liquorice.

I only noticed after writing the above that none of the linked recipes include it. Maybe it's a New York thing. Man! My world might be about to change for the drunker.
posted by invitapriore at 2:16 PM on December 21, 2009


WHY? Why couldn't you have posted this last week? Guess I'll have to wait until next year.
posted by etc. at 2:17 PM on December 21, 2009


Why couldn't you have posted this last week?

I didn't know until today! Believe me, I'm kicking myself, too!

as a half Puerto Rican, I'm ashamed to admit that the inclusion of anise will forever prevent me from liking the stuff.

As an Ouzo-swilling half-Greek, I would like to thank you for opening my eyes to this!
posted by Greg Nog at 2:20 PM on December 21, 2009


It sounds like this was a win-win cultural exchange, Greg Nog.
posted by invitapriore at 2:22 PM on December 21, 2009


I'm just relieved that none of the recipes include cute little frogs in the ingredients!
posted by amyms at 2:25 PM on December 21, 2009


WHY? Why couldn't you have posted this last week? Guess I'll have to wait until next year.

Why is it that egg nog and other "seasonal" drinks get limited to winter, often ending shortly after Christmas has passed? I wouldn't gorge on egg nog once a year if it were always available. If nothing else, Soy Nog should be a year-round item, because it's tasty like egg nog, but less thick.

I'd say this is more of an Epony-expected than -sterical item.
posted by filthy light thief at 2:26 PM on December 21, 2009


When it comes to Latin American seasonal beverages (preferably beige in color), I'm gonna have to come down on the side of Atol De Elote, a sweet, corn-based salvadoran dessert that is one of many regional variations of Atole, notably the Mexican Champurrado, which made with chocolate.
posted by joshwa at 2:32 PM on December 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


gah.
s/which made/which is made/

posted by joshwa at 2:33 PM on December 21, 2009




I'm a New Yorker and have never had coquito with anise in it. I detest anise, fennel, etc too. Coquito itself is goodness in a rich, coconutty package. I've mostly converted to soy nog for the holidays, but I wouldn't refuse a glass.
posted by cmgonzalez at 2:56 PM on December 21, 2009


Why is it that egg nog and other "seasonal" drinks get limited to winter, often ending shortly after Christmas has passed?

Indeed. Egg nog used to be just another way to ingest eggs, year-round. It was just food. 'Course, it probably tasted a bit different back then...
posted by lodurr at 3:18 PM on December 21, 2009


fennel? not raisins and clove?
posted by toodleydoodley at 3:39 PM on December 21, 2009


Winter's got the hot toddy, cider (both hot and cold), egg nog and hot buttered rum. Truly this is the greatest of the beverage seasons.
posted by electroboy at 3:40 PM on December 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


I'm trying to decide between making Cola de Mono (Chile) or Rompope (Central America and Mexico) for a holiday party this week. Now Coquito is a third option. Mmmm...
posted by papalotl at 3:55 PM on December 21, 2009


mmmm. as for me, I see putting it in a canning jar and cooking it for a while (ala dulce du leche) as an intriguing idea.
posted by boo_radley at 4:17 PM on December 21, 2009


Winter's got the hot toddy, cider (both hot and cold), egg nog and hot buttered rum.

... and mulled wine, including the insidious and totally wonderful German glühwein. Hrm. I should go shopping tomorrow so I can have some of that, actually. Mmmmm. Glühwein.
posted by hippybear at 4:22 PM on December 21, 2009


Nthing year round soy nog. It's like skim eggnog, if such a thing were possible. If you're the type to like an eggnog latte but not being in a calorific comatose stupor, it's the ideal solvent for your espresso.
posted by mccarty.tim at 4:38 PM on December 21, 2009


...and if you wanna be completely authentic about it, Cocina Criolla's recipe is this one:

English
2 big dry coconuts
2 cups of white rum from PR
1 can (14 oz) of condensed milk, without diluting
Nutmeg power or cinnamon powder
4 egg yolks

1. Open the coconuts and remove the material or pulp. Remove the black crust. Wash and grate.
2. Pour into a blender 1 cup of rum. Top with some grated coconut and blend.
3. Place a strainer with a cloth over it, over a pan and pour the liquid. Pick up the cloth and wring it out well to squeeze out the coconut milk. Discard the grated remains . Pour the squeezed liquid into a blender, add some more grated coconut, blend and repeat to make 2 cups.
4. Pour into blender, add the yolks and condensed milk. Blend and pour into large bowl. Add the remaining cup of rum and combine well. Place the beverage in bottles and store in refrigerator. Take it out 1 hour before serving. Shake well and serve in glasses sprinkled lightly with powdered nutmeg or cinnamon.

Spanish
2 cocos secos, grandes
2 tazas de ron blanco de Puerto Rico
1 lata (14 onzas) de leche condensada sin diluir
Polvo de nuez moscada o de canela
4 yemas

1. Abre los cocos y saque la tela o pulpa. Quitele la corteza negra. Lavelos y rallelos.
2. Vierta en una licuadora electrica 1 taza del ron. Agreguele parte del coco rallado y licue.
3. Coloque un colador, con un paño encima, sobre una cacerola y viertale lo licuado. Recoja el paño y retuerzalo bien para exprimir la leche de coco. Descarte la cachispa. Vierta el liquido exprimido en la licuadora, añadale mas coco rallado, licue y repita la operacion hasta obtener 2 tazas.
4. Viertalas en la licuadora, añada las yemas y la leche condensada. Licue y vierta en un recipiente grande. Añada la taza de ron restante y combine bien. Coloque la bebida en botellas y conserve en la nevera. Saquelo 1 hora antes de servir. Agite bien y sirva en copitas espolvoreadas ligeramente con polvo de nuez moscada o de canela.



and from El Boricua

Btw as an aside, I didn't feel like translating the whole thing and so I had google translate do it. I only had to touch up a few parts here or there. So well done Google!
posted by lizarrd at 4:56 PM on December 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


Flagged for unnecessary sexualization of FPP.

Not really


Yeah, not really. The man who feeds me eggnog can have me.
posted by orange swan at 5:06 PM on December 21, 2009


Thank you so much for posting this! My grandpa used to make cocquito before his hands got shakey. He would grate the coconut squeeze the grated coconut through a cloth and do some other stuff that I can't remember. He clams up when we ask him for details on anything so this feels like one of those lost traditions. We are still doing the pasteles the old school way but the cocquito is sorely missed. Maybe we'll do our own challenge next year. Thanks again!
posted by mokeydraws at 5:16 PM on December 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


This is obviously a self-drink.



sorry
posted by defenestration at 6:29 PM on December 21, 2009


Winter's got the hot toddy, cider (both hot and cold), egg nog and hot buttered rum. Truly this is the greatest of the beverage seasons.

I would agree with you except that summer has the Margarita, the Banana Daiquiri, and the Long Island Ice Tea....so...I'm going to have to call it a tie.

But I am sorry to report that I too, seize the day, viz a viz, drinking egg nog until it runs out my ears. I love egg nog ice cream and egg nog coffee and egg nog French Toast. I think I would love egg nog cookies and egg nog cake and egg nog candy except that I have never had any of these magically delightful combustibles.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 6:34 PM on December 21, 2009


I LOVE YOU EGG NOG THANK YOU GREGG NOGGG the extra gs r for gurglegurglrgurglr
posted by not_on_display at 7:51 PM on December 21, 2009 [1 favorite]


I did a Puerto Rican Christmas feast a few years ago using recipes from Daisy. Pernil, Arroz con Gandules, and Coquitos -- best feast ever!! the house smelled wonderful, the food fed an army, and the coquitos? Ay dios mio!
posted by vronsky at 9:00 PM on December 21, 2009


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