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King William' College Quiz 2009
December 23, 2009 4:31 AM   Subscribe

In which city did Peregrinus bring Christmas presents to the poor bookbinder's family? Which ordinal was applied to Sarto, the village postman's son? These questions and 138 more of similar obscurity will be answered in about a month! Why not have a go yourself while you wait? How many answers can you get without your search engine friend?
posted by biffa (133 comments total) 4 users marked this as a favorite

 
Holy crap, I can't even tell what a lot of those are asking, let alone what the answers might be. "gallinaceous"?

The one that makes me saddest to have no clue about is from the 1909 category: "which negative logarithm came from Carlsberg?" Without googling, what could that possibly be in reference to?
posted by DU at 4:39 AM on December 23, 2009


(after googling: Ah. I probably should have known that given my original major. *hangs head in shame*)
posted by DU at 4:40 AM on December 23, 2009


So... shall we do this thing?
posted by Kattullus at 4:46 AM on December 23, 2009


The answer to section 5, number 4 is Ko-Ko (from The Mikado). Got one so far without googling!
posted by kyrademon at 4:52 AM on December 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


Yes, but how? Answers in thread? I know the one DU doesn't (there aren't that many interesting negative logarithms, and the question is poorly phrased anyway - the opposite of a negative number is positive).
posted by Dr Dracator at 4:56 AM on December 23, 2009


Yeah, let's do this in-thread. What I've got is that I think that the answer to

During 1909 - 2 what was founded at the southern tip of Kinneret?

Is Hashomer.
posted by Kattullus at 5:00 AM on December 23, 2009


In section 15:

5. was thought, through its bite, to cause an extreme impulse to dance

is a tarantula

6. a probable tuberculous infection, so named after a breeding sow

is scrofula

7. abnormal passage connecting two epithelial surfaces

is a fistula

8. a broken bone is associated with an unspoken wish

is a furcula
posted by kyrademon at 5:05 AM on December 23, 2009


And of course the cruel Wallachian prince from same section was Vlad Dracula, which was one of about two I actually know, then have maybe a handful of guesses.
posted by Abiezer at 5:08 AM on December 23, 2009


And the city Peregrine brought Christmas presents to the poor bookbinder's family is Frankfurt. It's from E. T. A. Hoffman.
posted by Kattullus at 5:08 AM on December 23, 2009


9 How was the poisoner cook from John Fisher's household executed?

If I recall correctly, he was boiled.

5 who, contrary to generally accepted opinion, may have reached where after Cook?

Is the answer to this William Bligh reaching Tahiti?
posted by Sticherbeast at 5:09 AM on December 23, 2009


Actually, going from the -ula ending of answers to questions in that section, the Hill of the Fords (Q.10) is likely Benbecula then.
posted by Abiezer at 5:10 AM on December 23, 2009


17 - 2

What eponymous word owes its origin to: John Duns Scotus

The dunce cap.
posted by Kattullus at 5:11 AM on December 23, 2009


So the eponymous word from Haile Selassie would be Rastafari, I presume.
posted by Abiezer at 5:15 AM on December 23, 2009


7 The chiropteran hang-out of the eccentric.

Belfry!

8 Milne's joey by the river.

Roo?
posted by Sticherbeast at 5:15 AM on December 23, 2009


5 who, contrary to generally accepted opinion, may have reached where after Cook?

This will be Peary, and the North Pole, in 1909.
posted by woodblock100 at 5:16 AM on December 23, 2009


12 - 2

The queen Pepys kissed: Catherine of Valois. Fun fact! She had been dead over two hundred years when Pepys kissed her.
posted by Kattullus at 5:18 AM on December 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


5 who, in disgrace, became Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead? in 2009 would I presume be ex-speaker Michael Martin, who resigned in May.
posted by Abiezer at 5:21 AM on December 23, 2009


10 - 5

Alexander Samsonov probably committed suicide after the Russian 2nd Army, under his command, was annihilated by the German 8th Army at the Battle of Tannenberg in 1914.
posted by Kattullus at 5:24 AM on December 23, 2009


10 - 9

Alexander Graham Bell was challenged by Elisha Gray over the patent for the telephone.
posted by Kattullus at 5:26 AM on December 23, 2009


7 (What) nickname has been applied to the Ukraine?

This I believe, is the Breadbasket of Europe ...

4 is repetitious (and inspiring) at Cardiff?

Would this be the singing competition they have there annually?

9 Who was challenged by Gray over his patent?

Alexander Graham Bell
posted by woodblock100 at 5:26 AM on December 23, 2009


The queen who "made a posthumous journey to London leaving her viscera at Lincoln" was Eleanor I think, of the crosses fame such as Charing Cross.
posted by Abiezer at 5:27 AM on December 23, 2009


I think section 7 "who or what" may be "vans"

7.1 was watched at eye level?

eye level was the theme tune to TV programme Van der Valk


9 had a costly wetting in the Barry Burn?


Jean Van de Velde lost the Open golf championship on the last hole after hitting the ball into the Barry Burn at Carnoustie
posted by Jakey at 5:33 AM on December 23, 2009


7 - 4

A History of New York by Washington Irving is the tale found among the papers of the late Diedrich Knickerbocker.
posted by Kattullus at 5:35 AM on December 23, 2009


7 - 6

Peter Lely, born Pieter van der Faes, was instructed by Oliver Cromwell to paint him "warts and all."
posted by Kattullus at 5:37 AM on December 23, 2009


Some eponymous answers from section 17:

1. Chateaubriand

3. Melba toast

4. Mercator

5. Soubise

6. Sten gun

7. Sandwich
posted by kyrademon at 5:41 AM on December 23, 2009


5 which champion is now remembered for his predatory reptile motif?

Lacoste ... crocodile
posted by woodblock100 at 5:41 AM on December 23, 2009


Katullus, then keeping the theme, the answer to 7-4 must surely be the tale of Rip Van Winkle!
posted by kyrademon at 5:43 AM on December 23, 2009


In fact, yes, kyrademon.
posted by Kattullus at 5:46 AM on December 23, 2009


And I think 7.8 would be Hieronymus Bosch (Jeroen Anthoniszoon van Aken)
posted by kyrademon at 5:50 AM on December 23, 2009


11 - 5 is 137. (tearful memories of Tigris and Euphrates = by the rivers of Babylon we sat down and wept = Psalm 137).
posted by Infinite Jest at 5:50 AM on December 23, 2009


Sorry, that should be 11 - 6
posted by Infinite Jest at 5:51 AM on December 23, 2009


11 -3 is 38 I think (General MacArthur, 38th Parallel in Korean War).
posted by Infinite Jest at 5:52 AM on December 23, 2009


6.6 is Breadfruit ... so section 6 probably has a "bread" theme based on the Ukraine answer.

Which means 6.1 would be sweetbreads.
posted by kyrademon at 5:57 AM on December 23, 2009


On section eleven:

2. The trigeminal nerve is liable to neuralgia (the fifth cranial nerve, called V, so 5)
3. I think MacArthur secured the 38th parallel (so 38)
5. Sarto, the village postman's son, was Pope Pius X (so 10)
posted by kyrademon at 6:06 AM on December 23, 2009


10 - 3 This is Cecil Frances Alexander, in 'All Things Bright and Beautiful' ... "The cold wind in the winter"
posted by woodblock100 at 6:15 AM on December 23, 2009


Our story so far:

1.2 Hashomer
1.5 Peary, the North Pole

2

3.3 Frankfurt

4.5 Lacoste (crocodile)

5.4 Ko-Ko
5.9 boiled to death

6.1 Sweetbreads
6.6 Breadfruit
6.7 Breadbasket of Europe

7.1 Van der Valk
7.4 Rip van Winkle
7.6 Peter Lely, born Pieter van der Faes
7.8 Hieronymus Bosch, born Jeroen Anthoniszoon van Aken
7.9 Jean Van de Velde

8

9

10.3 Cecil Frances Alexander
10.5 Alexander Samsonov
10.10 Alexander Graham Bell

11.2 5
11.3 38
11.5 10
11.6 137

12.2 Catherine of Valois
12.4 Eleanor I

13

14.7 Bats in the belfry

15.3 Dracula
15.5 tarantula
15.6 scrofula
15.7 fistula
15.8 furcula
15.10 Benbecula

16

17.1. Chateaubriand
17.2 Dunce cap
17.3. Melba toast
17.4. Mercator
17.5. Soubise
17,6. Sten gun
17.7. Sandwich
17.8 Rastafari

18.5 Michael Martin
posted by kyrademon at 6:22 AM on December 23, 2009


18-7, "what non-event at Fort Collins recalled a fictional disaster in the Chilterns?"

Bubble Boy was from Fort Collins.
posted by Lucinda at 6:24 AM on December 23, 2009


Lucinda: Bubble Boy was from Fort Collins.

And the fictional event in the Chilterns was the first chapter in Ian McEwan's Enduring Love, in which someone dies in a ballooning accident.
posted by Len at 6:26 AM on December 23, 2009


18-9, "who will never stir again, however much he is shaken"

The actor who played Dr. No, Joseph Wiseman, died in September 2009.
posted by Lucinda at 6:29 AM on December 23, 2009


10.4 Alexander Fleming, the epic discovery being penicillin
10.7 Alexander I of Yugoslavia
10.10 Alexander Beetle, a creation of A.A. (Alan Alexander) Milne
posted by kyrademon at 6:38 AM on December 23, 2009


1 - 9 This is Hubert Latham, whose plane went down in the English Channel (La Manche) some days before Bleriot made his famous crossing (earning him a thousand pound prize).
posted by woodblock100 at 6:39 AM on December 23, 2009


9-8, "where does the brewer....commemorate Joanna Maria Lind?"

Joanna Maria Lind was Jenny Lind, the Swedish Nightengale...is there a beer named after her?

(10.9 is "Alexander Graham Bell", not 10.10)
posted by Lucinda at 6:39 AM on December 23, 2009


1 - 7 This is the Swedish writer Selma Ottilia Lovisa Lagerlöf, receiving her Nobel prize for literature.
posted by woodblock100 at 6:43 AM on December 23, 2009


15.1 is macula
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 6:45 AM on December 23, 2009


1-10 is pH, roughly the opposite of the decimal logarithm of H+ concentration.
posted by Dr Dracator at 6:49 AM on December 23, 2009


1 - 4 1909 is when bird banding first began in Britain, so the 'youngsters' mentioned may presumably be some kind of juvenile seabirds?
posted by woodblock100 at 6:51 AM on December 23, 2009


10.1 Alexander the coppersmith
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 6:53 AM on December 23, 2009


2-7: [Which Politician] transferred his nontransferable vouchers for his wife to travel from Glamorgan on the Great Western Railway?
Thomas Isaac Mardy Jones
posted by Len at 6:53 AM on December 23, 2009


9.6 "a battle with a heptacephalic rodent" is a reference to the E.T.A. Hoffman story (popular fellow) "The Nutracker and the Mouse King" that the ballet The Nutcracker is based on. No idea what that has to do with brewing.
posted by kyrademon at 6:57 AM on December 23, 2009


The theme of #16 looks like subway/metro stops in various cities with a "red" line.
posted by Lucinda at 6:59 AM on December 23, 2009


I always like to imagine that King William's College has a course in Advanced Pan-Centennial Minutia, in which a lecturer stands in front of the class making utterly disconnected statements, punctuated by the occasional "hrmm", "yussss", "hrmph!", and "this will, of course, be on the quiz".
posted by phooky at 7:04 AM on December 23, 2009


So if it's Alexanders for section 10, would it be Alexander III of Scotland who extended his realm into the Irish Sea? he got the Western Isles off the Norwegians after the Battle of Largs, which might count.
posted by Abiezer at 7:04 AM on December 23, 2009


15.9 Fratercula arctica, the Atlantic Puffin.

And with that I am out for a few hours. I've been trying to get the answer to 15.4 "overlooks the burial ground of Anne, Catherine and Jane" but the only Anne, Catherine, Jane trio I can think of is Henry the VIII's wives and Jane is the only one buried with him.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 7:13 AM on December 23, 2009


12 - 1

Queen Margaret of Anjou was a leader of the Lancastrians during the War of the Roses.
posted by Kattullus at 7:17 AM on December 23, 2009


16-9 Capel Street and Henry Street are in Dublin, but they don't intersect. Can any Dubs help this Galwegian out?

16-4 Sancova Ulica is downtown Bratislava

16-6 Boulevard Malesherbes is in Paris - there's a Hyatt Regency there that I stayed in.

So, no answers, just hints I'm afraid.
posted by Nick Verstayne at 7:18 AM on December 23, 2009


5.10 John Babbacombe Lee
posted by adamvasco at 7:19 AM on December 23, 2009


Thought of that connection too, SLoG; you saying that about Jane Seymour got me thinking that the Jane might then be Lady Jane Grey. I have cheated on this one, having read the wiki article about her, she was buried in the Chapel of St Peter ad Vincula which fits the pattern and article confirms the other two are buried there also.
posted by Abiezer at 7:19 AM on December 23, 2009


Aha! Lucinda, you beat me to it on the Red theme.
posted by Nick Verstayne at 7:21 AM on December 23, 2009


12 - 8

Caroline of Ansbach
posted by Kattullus at 7:29 AM on December 23, 2009


7 - 7 is John Vanbrugh.
posted by Pallas Athena at 7:32 AM on December 23, 2009


7.7 I suspect this might be Mies van der Rohe.
posted by chinston at 7:32 AM on December 23, 2009


Ah - no, Pallas Athena has it.
posted by chinston at 7:33 AM on December 23, 2009


(I'm going to be late for Yoga)
12.3 Emma of Normandy Queen consort to both Aethelred the Unready and King Canute the Great.
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 7:38 AM on December 23, 2009


7 - 10 The producer of 'Ghost Whisperer' was medium James Van Praagh ... ??
posted by woodblock100 at 7:39 AM on December 23, 2009


10.2: Alexander III of Scotland. (He won the Isle of Man from the Norse.)
posted by Iridic at 7:51 AM on December 23, 2009


What on earth is the theme for section 8?

All I can get out of it is Django Reinhart (or Jerry Garcia) still playing guitar after losing fingers (8 - 6). 'Caprine slaughter' is probably about goat sacrifice (8 - 5). And 'facial expression ... fireside utensil' is presumably something to do with 'poker face' (8 - 7).
posted by woodblock100 at 7:56 AM on December 23, 2009


He can't mean Lady Gaga, right?
posted by Iridic at 7:57 AM on December 23, 2009


5.3 John Byng (pour encourage les autres)
posted by otio at 7:59 AM on December 23, 2009


18 - 6 Wikipedia has this one - the General Sherman in 1866. "North Korea issued a postage stamp commemorating the sinking in 2009."
posted by woodblock100 at 8:16 AM on December 23, 2009


If 8-6 is Django, I can see 8-3 being Ringo (where 'best' is Pete Best).

Lady Gaga would fit if the theme is music, but not if it's the "ngo" ending.
posted by Bun at 8:33 AM on December 23, 2009


On further review, this could make 8-10 "Tango."
posted by Bun at 8:35 AM on December 23, 2009


Like the thinking Bun. Would the name reversion post-caprine slaughter be Zaire going back to being the Congo then? No idea where dead goats come into it though.
posted by Abiezer at 8:43 AM on December 23, 2009


So can we admit to answers we've found using Google?
posted by Lucinda at 8:43 AM on December 23, 2009


I did above with that chapel full of executed queens and others. Not sure anyone would have believed I had it on the tip of the tongue anyway.
posted by Abiezer at 8:45 AM on December 23, 2009


8.1 is bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus).
posted by Iridic at 8:48 AM on December 23, 2009


8.2 is mango .
posted by Iridic at 8:54 AM on December 23, 2009


Here are answers I found through Google, rot13'd for those who consider it cheating:

6.4 vf "Oernq bs Urnira" (fhat gb fhccbeg Jryfu ehtol cynlref)

8.9 vf qebatb.
posted by Lucinda at 9:11 AM on December 23, 2009


Unless you're Googling directly for "King William's College Quiz Answers," it's hardly cheating. "To know where you can find anything is, after all, the greatest part of erudition."
posted by Iridic at 9:18 AM on December 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


15.2 - The Vistula river in Poland is spanned by the Poniatowski Bridge, which is named after Prince Józef Poniatowski, whose nickname was 'Pepi'.
posted by eatyourcellphone at 9:19 AM on December 23, 2009


10.6 Tsar Alexander I of Russia/Feodor Kuzmich.
posted by Iridic at 9:26 AM on December 23, 2009


Going back to section 16, while the cities where these streets are located have metros/subways (Bucharest/Copenhagen/Singapore/Bratislava/Stockholm/Paris/Barcelona/Tallinn/Dublin/Helsinki) , and have red lines, the streets in question don't always correspond to stops on the route.

Anyone live in any of these places and can help out?
posted by Lucinda at 9:47 AM on December 23, 2009


Lucinda - Indeed - neither the Luas (light rail) nor the DART (commuter rail) have stops at Capel Street and Henry Street, the Luas does have a Red Line, though.
posted by Nick Verstayne at 9:53 AM on December 23, 2009


18.2 "whose victory in Bavaria has recalled I Samuel XVII?"

First book of Samuel, Chapter 17 is the David and Goliath story. It looks like the David Haye vs. Nikolay Valuev boxing match in Nuremberg, Germany was billed as "David and Goliath". So I guess the answer is David Haye.
posted by Lucinda at 10:01 AM on December 23, 2009


6.8 The best thing since sliced bread

8.7 definitely Lady Gaga

4468 is driving me batty!
posted by Wrinkled Stumpskin at 10:56 AM on December 23, 2009


12.10 is Queen Anne: The promised Garter was withheld from Marlborough, and the incensed "Mrs. Morley" in her letters to "Mrs. Freeman" styled the king "Caliban" or the "Dutch Monster."
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 11:00 AM on December 23, 2009


4468 Mallard is apparently the fastest steam locomotive in the world. Could that be something?
posted by Lucinda at 11:54 AM on December 23, 2009


Section 9 seems to be all about beer and birds. I guessed some answers that I then checked on Google. Here are my possible answers:

Where does the brewer:

1 recall 4468?


4468 Mallard is, as Lucinda says, a kind of train, a mallard is a kind of duck, and there is a Mallard Brewery in Nottingham.

2 produce a preserved gamebird?


Hall and Woodhouse Brewery in Dorset produces Pickled Partridge Ale.

3 start his product with a silent "P"?

Harviestoun Brewery in Scotland makes Ptarmigan beer.

4 provide a label for a hirsute cage bird?


Old Chimneys Brewery in Sussex makes Hairy Canary beer.

5 remember the birthplace of 007's adventures?


Ian Fleming's Jamaican estate was called 'Goldeneye', a goldeneye is a type of duck, and Scotland's Black Isle Brewery produces a Goldeneye beer.

6 remind us of a battle with a heptacephalic rodent?

This is from 'The Nutcracker', as kyrademon says, a nutcracker is also a kind of bird, and the Wem Brewing Company in Shropshire produces Nutcracker Ale.

7 produce evidence of canine appreciation?

Wagging its tail is what a dog does when pleased, a wagtail is a kind of bird, and there is a Wagtail brewery in Norfolk.

8 commemorate Joanna Maria Lind?

Jenny Lind was known as the Swedish Nightingale. Malvern Hills Brewery in Worcestershire produces Swedish Nightingale Ale.

9 appear to condone avian greed?

Dunno.

10 recognise a recurved bill?

Dunno.

If these answers are right, it seems strange that the bird theme is sometimes reflected in the name of the beer itself and sometimes in the brewery's name. And the questions asks 'where' but the thematic link is not in the locations of the breweries. So all this may be absolutely wrong.
posted by eatyourcellphone at 12:12 PM on December 23, 2009


11.10 - which ordinal was applied to Lime?

Harry Lime was the Third Man.
posted by Lucinda at 12:27 PM on December 23, 2009


Well done, eatyourcellphone!
posted by Iridic at 12:28 PM on December 23, 2009


9.10 - recognise a recurved bill?

The Avocet appears to be the prime example of a bird with a recurved bill, and sure enough there's an Avocet Ale produced by The Exeter Brewery in Exminster, Exeter.
posted by bunyip at 1:07 PM on December 23, 2009


Our story so far (section 15 is done!):

1.2 Hashomer
1.4 juvenile seabirds
1.5 Peary, the North Pole
1.7 Selma Ottilia Lovisa Lagerlöf
1.9 Hubert Latham
1.10 pH

2.7 Thomas Isaac Mardy Jones

3.3 Frankfurt

4.5 Lacoste (crocodile)

5.3 John Byng
5.4 Ko-Ko
5.9 boiled to death
5.10 John Babbacombe Lee

6.1 Sweetbreads
6.4 "Oernq bs Urnira" (fhat gb fhccbeg Jryfu ehtol cynlref) (rot 13)
6.6 Breadfruit
6.7 Breadbasket of Europe
6.8 The best thing since sliced bread

7.1 Van der Valk
7.4 Rip van Winkle
7.6 Peter Lely, born Pieter van der Faes
7.7 John Vanbrugh
7.8 Hieronymus Bosch, born Jeroen Anthoniszoon van Aken
7.9 Jean Van de Velde

8.1 bongo
8.2 mango
8.3 Ringo Starr
8.6 Django Reinhart
8.9 qebatb (rot 13)
8.10 Tango

9.1 Mallard Brewery
9.2 Pickled Partridge Ale
9.3 Ptarmigan beer
9.4 Hairy Canary beer
9.5 Goldeneye beer
9.6 Nutcracker Ale
9.7 Wagtail brewery
9.8 Swedish Nightingale Ale
9.10 Avocet Ale

10.1 Alexander the coppersmith
10.2 Alexander III of Scotland
10.3 Cecil Frances Alexander
10.4 Alexander Fleming
10.5 Alexander Samsonov
10.6 Tsar Alexander I of Russia/Feodor Kuzmich
10.7 Alexander I of Yugoslavia
10.9 Alexander Graham Bell
10.10 Alexander Beetle, a creation of A.A. (Alan Alexander) Milne

11.2 5
11.3 38
11.5 10
11.6 137
11.10 3

12.1 Queen Margaret of Anjou
12.2 Catherine of Valois
12.3 Emma of Normandy
12.4 Eleanor
12.8 Caroline of Ansbach
12.10 Queen Anne

13

14.7 Bats in the belfry

15.1 macula
15.2 Vistula
15.3 Dracula
15.4 Chapel of St Peter ad Vincula
15.5 tarantula
15.6 scrofula
15.7 fistula
15.8 furcula
15.9 Fratercula arctica
15.10 Benbecula

16

17.1 Chateaubriand
17.2 Dunce cap
17.3 Melba toast
17.4. Mercator
17.5 Soubise
17,6 Sten gun
17.7 Sandwich
17.8 Rastafari

18.2 David Haye
18.5 Michael Martin
18.7 Balloon Boy
18.9 Joseph Wiseman (Dr. No)
posted by kyrademon at 1:11 PM on December 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


Another avian answer!

13-3 Which English cathedral contains a medieval lectern representing a large water bird?

I think this must be Norwich Cathedral, which has a lectern representing 'a pelican in her piety', which is to say a pelican wounding her own breast with her beak. Mediaeval people believed that mother pellies fed their young with their own blood, and this was used as a symbol of Christ shedding his blood for the good of human beings. Or something like that.
posted by eatyourcellphone at 1:14 PM on December 23, 2009


(Somehow left off 18.6 The General Sherman)
posted by kyrademon at 1:17 PM on December 23, 2009


Could it be Alexander Pope who considered his life "a protracted period of infirmity?" He was certainly sickly, but I can't find any pithy couplets or quotes to confirm his opinions on the matter.
posted by Iridic at 1:23 PM on December 23, 2009


9.9 appear to condone avian greed?

Could 9.9 be the Magpie Brewery?
posted by explosion at 1:28 PM on December 23, 2009


13.8 is Rochester Cathedral, the resting place of Walter de Merton.
posted by Iridic at 1:31 PM on December 23, 2009


Somehow left off 18.6 The General Sherman
I suggested (in a waffly-easy-to-miss-fashion) Congo for 8.5 and I reckon that's right.
posted by Abiezer at 1:39 PM on December 23, 2009


Section 3 appears to be German cities in literature:

3.1 Cologne (Stamboul Train, Graham Greene)
3.2 Dresden (Three Men in a Bummel, Jerome K Jerome)
posted by kyrademon at 1:55 PM on December 23, 2009


9.9 appear to condone avian greed?

Anyone know of Gannet Ale? Or something like that...
posted by Wrinkled Stumpskin at 1:55 PM on December 23, 2009


6.10 could be Naan bread
posted by kyrademon at 1:58 PM on December 23, 2009


12.6 Which Queen of England or Great Britain on first meeting her future spouse had prompted him to order a glass of brandy?

I knew I'd read about this somewhere. It was Caroline of Brunswick, the wife of George IV. She wasn't that good-looking, obviously. Mind you, George himself was no prize.

8.9 Who or what is black and fork-tailed?

This is almost certainly an animal or bird. I suggest drongo. There's a real bird theme emerging here.
posted by eatyourcellphone at 1:58 PM on December 23, 2009


I have a hunch that section 16 is not to do with subway lines but is to do with the boardgame Monopoly and that the street names listed are two of the three that make up the red set.
posted by electricinca at 2:11 PM on December 23, 2009


And with a little help from Google

16.6 Avenue Matignon
16.9 Abbey Street
16.10 Annankatu
posted by electricinca at 2:18 PM on December 23, 2009


I have a hunch that section 16 is not to do with subway lines but is to do with the boardgame Monopoly and that the street names listed are two of the three that make up the red set.

Oh well done, electricinca. That's exactly what it is. I found these:

16.2 Børsgade
16.5 Hamngatan

And I'm too lazy to look them up myself, but the rest can probably be found here.

Incidentally, there's a spelling mistake in 16.2 -- Torvgade should be Torvegade.
posted by Tau Wedel at 2:19 PM on December 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


I think that people have got the wrong end of the stick with section 14. It's asking for a venue and an activity. Rather than 'bats in the belfry', I think the answer to 14.7 should be 'The Belfry', which is a golf course in England.

14.2 A half of cuckoo pint.

Cuckoo pint is the plant Arum maculatum, also known as 'lords and ladies'. Half of 'lords and ladies' is 'lords', so I think the answer to this one is Lord's, the famous cricket ground.
posted by eatyourcellphone at 2:30 PM on December 23, 2009


16.7 is Calle de Fonatella
posted by Lucinda at 2:35 PM on December 23, 2009


German cities in literature ...

Yes! 3-9 is Flensburg (Riddle of the Sands, Erskine Childers)
posted by woodblock100 at 2:39 PM on December 23, 2009


14.4 Simmonite, lacking a vowel.

Bill Owen played a character named Compo Simmonite in the UK television series 'Last of the Summer Wine'. Bill Owen minus the letter e is Billown. The Billown Circuit is a motorcycle racing course on the Isle of Man.
posted by eatyourcellphone at 2:40 PM on December 23, 2009


Thanks for that link Tau Wedel. So for completeness sake all the answers for 16 are

16.1 Bdul Kogalniceanu
16.2 Børsgade
16.3 Collyer Quay
16.4 Palisády
16.5 Hamngatan
16.6 Avenue Matignon
16.7 is Calle de Fonatella
16.8 Narva maantee
16.9 Abbey Street
16.10 Annankatu
posted by electricinca at 2:45 PM on December 23, 2009 [1 favorite]


11-8 This must be Stephen Wraysford, who writes a coded diary in Faulks' novel 'Birdsong'. But I don't have the book here ...
posted by woodblock100 at 2:50 PM on December 23, 2009


Bringing us to:

Section 1 (1909) 6/10
1.2 Hashomer
1.4 juvenile seabirds
1.5 Peary, the North Pole
1.7 Selma Ottilia Lovisa Lagerlöf
1.9 Hubert Latham
1.10 pH

Section 2 (Disgraced Politicians) 1/10
2.7 Thomas Isaac Mardy Jones

Section 3 (German Cities in Literature) 4/10
3.1 Cologne
3.2 Dresden
3.3 Frankfurt
3.9 Flensburg

Section 4 (Finals of the AELT & CC's Championships) 1/10
4.5 Lacoste (crocodile)

Section 5 (Executions and Executioners) 4/10
5.3 John Byng
5.4 Ko-Ko
5.9 boiled to death
5.10 John Babbacombe Lee

Section 6 (Breads) 6/10
6.1 Sweetbreads
6.4 Bread of Heaven
6.6 Breadfruit
6.7 Breadbasket of Europe
6.8 The best thing since sliced bread
6.10 Naan bread

Section 7 (Vans) 6/10
7.1 Van der Valk
7.4 Rip van Winkle
7.6 Peter Lely, born Pieter van der Faes
7.7 John Vanbrugh
7.8 Hieronymus Bosch, born Jeroen Anthoniszoon van Aken
7.9 Jean Van de Velde

Section 8 (-ngo) 7/10
8.1 bongo
8.2 mango
8.3 Ringo Starr
8.5 Congo
8.6 Django Reinhart
8.9 drongo
8.10 Tango

Section 9 (Bird-Related Beers) 10/10
9.1 Mallard Brewery
9.2 Pickled Partridge Ale
9.3 Ptarmigan beer
9.4 Hairy Canary beer
9.5 Goldeneye beer
9.6 Nutcracker Ale
9.7 Wagtail brewery
9.8 Swedish Nightingale Ale
9.9 Magpie Brewery
9.10 Avocet Ale

Section 10 (Alexanders) 10/10
10.1 Alexander the coppersmith
10.2 Alexander III of Scotland
10.3 Cecil Frances Alexander
10.4 Alexander Fleming
10.5 Alexander Samsonov
10.6 Tsar Alexander I of Russia/Feodor Kuzmich
10.7 Alexander I of Yugoslavia
10.8 Alexander Pope
10.9 Alexander Graham Bell
10.10 Alexander Beetle, a creation of A.A. (Alan Alexander) Milne

Section 11 (Numbers) 5/10
11.2 5
11.3 38
11.5 10
11.6 137
11.10 3

Section 12 (Queens) 7/10
12.1 Queen Margaret of Anjou
12.2 Catherine of Valois
12.3 Emma of Normandy
12.4 Eleanor
12.6 Caroline of Brunswick
12.8 Caroline of Ansbach
12.10 Queen Anne

Section 13 (English Cathedrals) 2/10
13.3 Norwich Cathedral
13.8 Rochester Cathedral

Section 14 (Sports Venues) 3/10
14.2 Lord's - cricket
14.4 Billown - motorcycle racing
14.7 The Belfry - golf

Section 15 (-ula) 10/10
15.1 macula
15.2 Vistula
15.3 Dracula
15.4 Chapel of St Peter ad Vincula
15.5 tarantula
15.6 scrofula
15.7 fistula
15.8 furcula
15.9 Fratercula arctica
15.10 Benbecula

Section 16 (Red Monopoly sets around the world) 10/10
16.1 Bdul Kogalniceanu
16.2 Børsgade
16.3 Collyer Quay
16.4 Palisády
16.5 Hamngatan
16.6 Avenue Matignon
16.7 is Calle de Fonatella
16.8 Narva maantee
16.9 Abbey Street
16.10 Annankatu

Section 17 (Eponymous Items) 8/10
17.1 Chateaubriand
17.2 Dunce cap
17.3 Melba toast
17.4 Mercator
17.5 Soubise
17,6 Sten gun
17.7 Sandwich
17.8 Rastafari

Section 18 (2009) 5/10
18.2 David Haye
18.5 Michael Martin
18.6 The General Sherman
18.7 Balloon Boy
18.9 Joseph Wiseman (Dr. No)

Total:: 105/180 (not all answers are guaranteed correct)
posted by kyrademon at 2:59 PM on December 23, 2009


12.9 Queen Mary maintained her anger with Edward and her indignation over his marriage to Wallis: "To give up all this for that", she said
posted by Secret Life of Gravy at 3:19 PM on December 23, 2009


14.1 Royal flood-plain.

This may be King's Marsh Stadium, home ground of A.F.C. Sudbury football (soccer) club.
posted by eatyourcellphone at 3:26 PM on December 23, 2009


4-7 This page explains that Gottfried von Cramm, who lost to Budge in the Wimbledon final in 1937, was arrested 'for homosexual acts' when he returned to Germany.
posted by woodblock100 at 3:38 PM on December 23, 2009


4-8 Brooke Shields' grandfather was Francis X. Shields, singles finalist in 1931
posted by woodblock100 at 3:41 PM on December 23, 2009


13.6 Which English cathedral has a gallinaceous motif commemorating the founder of a Cambridge college?

Ely Cathedral. Bishop John Alcock, founder of Jesus College, had a chapel built in this cathedral.

"Upon the tomb itself, and in the glass of the east window, is the Bishop's rebus or device — a cock on a globe. His shield of arms (three cocks' heads) is over the south door."

13.10 Which English cathedral houses the only equestrian statue?


St. Paul's has an equestrian statue of the 1st Duke of Wellington.
posted by eatyourcellphone at 4:57 PM on December 23, 2009


Totally meant to add this earlier, but got distracted by real life/beer ...

2.8 [Which politician] similarly [to the aforementioned Mardy Jones] provided, inappropriately, first-class tickets for his mistress to travel to Yorkshire?

David Blunkett, who gave Kimberley Quinn a first class return to his Yorkshire constituency.
posted by Len at 5:27 PM on December 23, 2009


2.9 was impeached on bribery charges shortly after his elevation to a viscountcy?

Hendy Dundas, Viscount Melville and the last person to be impeached in the UK
posted by Len at 5:29 PM on December 23, 2009


1.3 who filed a patent for a hermetically sealed burial casket?

It's patent "GB17056", and it was filed for in December 1909, but I can't find out who filed it. (found it here)

1.8 8 which Portuguese island colonies lost their Quaker customers?

São Tomé and Principe Islands. (William Cadbury has visited both Principe and São Tomé, and he persuades two other Quaker cocoa and chocolate firms (Fry and Rowntree) to join in a boycott of cacao from the Portuguese African islands...)
posted by Lucinda at 5:30 PM on December 23, 2009


2.2 was expelled as Speaker following bribery by the Corporation?

This is Sir John Trevor, the last speaker before Michael Martin to be unceremoniously chucked out of office in 1695.

2.5 was impeached, but not convicted, for allegedly accepting a bribe of 5,000 guineas from the East India Company?

And this is Thomas Osbourne, Duke of Leeds, also in 1695; almost as good a year as 2009 for dodgy political dealings, it seems.

2.10 used a Guest List for awarding Orders and other honours?

Is this summat to do with Lloyd George and the 1920s scandal over flogging peerages? Seems like it might be, but I can't see where "guest list" fits in ...
posted by Len at 5:38 PM on December 23, 2009


18.1 in 2009, who mischievously rocked the boat?

Could this have something to do with The Boat that Rocked?
posted by Lucinda at 6:14 PM on December 23, 2009


Lucinda: 18.1 in 2009, who mischievously rocked the boat?

Could this have something to do with The Boat that Rocked?


I was wondering about this earlier, but I'm more inclined to think that the answer is Hazel Blears, who apparently was "very sorry that she wore a brooch which read "Rocking the Boat"" on the day of her resignation.
posted by Len at 6:40 PM on December 23, 2009


5.5 Which sexagenarian was chased around the scaffold and needed 11 blows with the axe? I'm guessing this will be Simon Fraser, Lord Lovat who was the last person to be beheaded in Britain (for his part in one of the Jacobite risings); he was certainly already pretty old and got the option of a beheading rather than hanging as a noble. Accounts I've found online so far mention some of the viewing galleries collapsing killling spectators, but not him running about, though.
posted by Abiezer at 8:53 PM on December 23, 2009


Then again, reading about him being carried about by litter makes the running around unlikely. Scratch that.
posted by Abiezer at 8:58 PM on December 23, 2009


Fraser was also an octogenarian, not a sexagenarian.
posted by kyrademon at 9:40 PM on December 23, 2009


Yeah, but apart from that it was a great suggestion. *whistles*
posted by Abiezer at 9:48 PM on December 23, 2009


Lord Lovat was the subject of the latest Hark! A Vagrant comic.
posted by Kattullus at 5:06 PM on December 24, 2009


5.5 Which sexagenarian was chased around the scaffold and needed 11 blows with the axe?

Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury. She was sent to the block by Henry VIII on trumped up treason charges: the real reason being that her son had pissed Henry off and she and her family were the last remaining members of the Plantagenet family, aka the family the Tudors had wrested the throne from only a few decades before.
According to legend, the executioner was inexperienced and when his first blow failed to take her head off, she jumped up and ran from him, crying out that if he wanted her head he'd have to get it as best he could. The executioner supposedly chased her around (Tower Green or the scaffold, depending on the version being told), hacking at her head and body eleven times before she finally fell dead.
posted by miss sarah thane at 11:58 PM on December 25, 2009 [1 favorite]


(And as this page vanishes in to memory, the Metafilter total seems to be: 118/180. Roughly 65 percent. A solid D!
posted by kyrademon at 2:42 PM on December 26, 2009


(It is extremely unfortunate that this page is now showing up in every google search for research in trying to answer the quiz with the internet without cheating, it's like the biggest spoiler ever. In an incredibly geeky field)
posted by Augenblick at 3:52 PM on December 27, 2009



2.2 Speaker Trevor 1695; he accepted a large bribe from the City of London

2.3 Neil Hamilton lost his seat (Tatton Park) to Martin Bell in the 1997 election, following a grubby tale of sleaze and backhanders in brown envelopes.

2.4 James Craggs also in 1695 (a bad year!!); there's an Enoch Craggs in Disraeli's Endymion

2.5 Thomas Osborne, 1st Duke of Leeds

2,6 Henry Fox (the income continued to be paid until 1780, despite the fact the he resigned in 1765 and died in 1774)

2.8 David Blunkett - tickets for his mistress Kimberley Quin

2.9 Francis Bacon

2.10 Lloyd George, used the list provided by his Chief Whip Freddie Guest, to award honours and peerages for cash; the middle man in this was Maunday Gregory.


8.7 How about yellow dog dingo? There's a Rudyard Kipling tale "The Sing-Song of Old Man Kangaroo" where the kangaroo is chased all day by a dingo "off ran dingo, yellow dog dingo, always hungry, grinning like a coal scuttle....."

18.1 Hazel Blears it is. She resigned the day before the European and local elections and was wearing a brooch which featured a boat and the words "rocking the boat"; she apparently couldn't see what the press was getting at.... She later said she might have got her timing wrong.
posted by lesbroux at 9:14 AM on December 29, 2009


A few more possible answers. Pure Google-age, I'm afraid, but I'm too impatient to wait until the end of January for all the answers to be released.

12.5 Which Queen of England or Great Britain numbered two archbishops and one bishop among her maternal uncles?

This is Eleanor of Provence, wife of Henry III. She is not the same Eleanor who left her viscera behind, that was Eleanor of Castile, wife of Edward I. Eleanor of Provence's uncles Boniface and Philip were archbishops and her uncle William was a bishop. All three were brothers of Eleanor's mother Beatrice of Savoy.

13.2 Which English cathedral has both a Bishop and a Dean with a glass eye?

Lincoln Cathedral has stained glass windows called the Bishop's Eye and the Dean's Eye.

13.4 Which English cathedral has accommodated a pilgrim and his family annually since 2002?

Chichester Cathedral has been a nesting site for a pair of peregrines (AKA peregrine falcons) since 2002. Peregrine=pilgrim, get it?

13.9 Which English cathedral has a pulpit accessed by an intramural staircase?

Chester Cathedral has a pulpit that is accessed by a set of stairs built into its walls.
posted by eatyourcellphone at 6:41 PM on December 29, 2009


The answers are now posted on the KWC site:
http://www.kwc.im/documents/GKP_A_2009-10.pdf
posted by lesbroux at 1:01 AM on January 21, 2010


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